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What is the best method to learn japanese??
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23 / F / Pasadena - City o...
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Posted 8/29/14
I was curious about Rosetta Stone until someone had pointed out that it didn't work that well, it got annoying afr a while and while teaching you new words and phrase it did NOT teach proper Japanese grammar. or casual/slang speaking.

so does anyone else know a better method online a more reliable method if possible, it doesnt have to br FREE
im willing to pay to speak properly.

Posted 8/29/14
Take a class.
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櫻府
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Posted 8/29/14
You can try translating manga. It doesn't always teach the best grammar, but it will give you a general idea.
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40 / M / Minnesota, USA
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Posted 8/29/14 , edited 9/6/14
The best method is to take classes, but no everybody has access to that. Here is how I am doing it:

First you need to learn the characters. I used the "Hiragana Party" app for my iPhone and it worked really well. It gets pretty hard but it really drills the characters into your head. If you go back and review a bit, you should get the characters down pretty quick. You can skip this step and try to learn how to speak without becoming literate, but I wouldn't suggest it.

You'll also need to add to your vocabulary. I use the Mindsnack's Japanese App for this. The price for all the Japanese lessons is pretty cheap and they are fairly extensive. You can play the games with either Romanji, Hiragana, or Kanji, so the you should be getting use out of this app for a long time.

For sentence structure and such, I recommend the NHK's (a Japanese broadcaster) Japanese lessons. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/lesson/english/index.html There are 50 lessons and a downloadable workbook available for free. This combined with http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/ should help you with syntax and sentence structure. After this you should be able to start consuming Manga and Anime in their original forms.

To practice speaking, try to find a local Japanese club (or start one!). There are many Japanese culture centers in the US that have clubs where people go to a coffee shop or some such place and speak in Japanese for a while every week. If you've taken the time to become literate as well, you can try message boards and forums in Japanese to try to converse with people in.

Good luck!
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21 / M
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Posted 8/29/14
It's not about the best method, it's about the most fun method. There's no right way or groundbreaking way to learn a language so you might as well enjoy yourself. If you enjoy the learning, you'll naturally spend a lot of time on it and naturally get good really quickly as a result. If you force yourself to do boring things to learn then you will feel it everyday until you probably quit eventually. This can involve not studying, but learning from a lot of things you'd feel guilty about-like playing video games(especially with voicing) or reading untranslated doujinshi! I ran into people who pretty much learned a language well through doing that.

I do not discourage grammar learning since it gives you hints but it shouldn't be your main method of learning grammar ironically. You learn grammar by context, not by figuring out how to organize it in your head.
http://www.alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/there-is-no-grammar

What a lot of polyglots tell you is that they don't study languages much at all. They make it a part of their lives and enjoy it. I know 1 of them learned to be fluent in Chinese in 11 months at everything, including writing. He spent about 7 hours daily going at it which is still less than how much time a toddler would spend(kids learning languages faster myth has been debunked several times over by polyglots).

I do not support learning by classes btw. Everyone was taught to think classes are good for language learning but they suck in truth.

Try googleing:
alljapaneseallthetime
fluentin3months
lingq
polyglotdream
jalup

Now what's misleading is that while some of these bloggers support Anki, they also say it's not worth it if you don't enjoy it which you can find if you look hard enough.
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25 / F / Canada
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Posted 8/29/14
I'm not fluent at all and I don't know many words but I enjoyed the application Tae Kim's Guide to Learning Japanese. It's useful for basic sentence stuff (verbs times, particles, etc.) I frequently use the dictionnary app imiwa? when I hear or read a new word too.
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Posted 8/29/14
Here's a tip, and this is coming from a ハーフ:

Do not start with slang - you can't start running around to every Japanese speaker you find and spouting whatever informal phrases you know. You're going to make someone upset with what is deemed as rude behavior. There are very specific honorifics and terms used for certain situations and people. And a foreigner trying to use slang and region-specific speech is laughable. You're deemed as a "fake" when you try to do that.

Learn your basics. Memorize Hiragana and Katakana. If you can't read simple sentences, you're as good as dead in the Japanese culture.
Also, learn to use particles. Most learners struggle with this the most and they basically rule everything in the language.

Seriously take a class at a college or university or wherever an accredited teacher is available. You might cringe at the thought of spending the money, but it's worth it in the long run.

PRACTICE. PRACTICE. PRACTICE.
I can't emphasize this enough. You need to push your listening, writing, reading, and speech skills to the limits in order to learn a new language. It takes YEARS and you must practice outside of the classroom too. Try every possible method you can find for learning. When it comes to Kanji/Hiragana/Katakana, use flash cards.

You can't stay narrow-minded when it comes to language learning.

頑張ってください。
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26 / M / Socal
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Posted 8/29/14
It's all fun and games till we hit the Kanji...

class is probably the best and then we tie you up and send you off to Japan and see how it goes >:3
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21 / M
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Posted 8/29/14
From what I heard from people who learned the language and what studies show, I think Kanji is only a difficulty if you want to learn how to write them(lol everybody in Asia types characters nowadays)... or at least until you hit pretty close to the 1000 point.

If you're just learning how to read them, you're pretty much going to kill 2 birds with 1 stone picking them up with vocabulary, no flash cards/Anki required.


Seriously, I hate most popular language learning myths.
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Posted 8/29/14
I can speak three languages (one I had to learn) and learning another. I just took classes online/in person.
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24 / M / Not telling
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Posted 8/29/14
I am starting a Japanese class on Tuesday. I can let you know how it goes as time goes by if you'd like.
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30 / M / Virginia
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Posted 8/29/14
I tried somebody else's Rosetta Stone and it IS NOT worth the money, it just isn't. I actually have a bunch of different audio courses that I listen to.

Collins Japanese
Pimsleur
Michael Thomas

and for the Hiragana and Katakana I use Dr. Moku. Still I'm going back to school soon and I'm going to take classes as well because I just don't feel like doing it on my own is allowing me to learn it well enough.
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F / Winter Wonderland
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Posted 8/29/14
I think all the ways mentioned above are great methods. In addition to learning it from classes, you should try to make Japanese friends, or friends who are taking Japanese classes to enhance your verbal experience. It also should help you think in the language a lot faster than trying to translate from English to Japanese and Japanese to English all the time.
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24 / F / Las Vegas nevada
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Posted 9/3/14
Every time I try to learn a new language I always casually ask people how to say certain words or sentence.
Somehow they always help me
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37 / M / Oregon
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Posted 9/4/14
learn hiragana and katakana, learn some simple vocabulary for a base foundation, then start reading shonen and shojo manga. Get something that is translated and has practical dialog like a seishun manga. Read both the Japanese and the English side by side. The shonen and shojo manga have furigana, so you can get acclimated to kanji, and if the art is done right, the pictures will provide appropriate context for the dialog.

Also, watch some practical shows, nothing with overly complex vocabulary. Renai dramas that are subbed are good. The objective is to learn practical Japanese.


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