Define Story
41690 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Somewhere
Offline
Posted 9/4/14 , edited 9/4/14
I did not see a topic already like this, but if I overlooked something please lock this. I also hope I put this in the right category as I think there is more that can be discussed than just a simple sentence.

Okay so one of the college courses I am taking in my freshman year is Narrative Concept and Development. I love this class and think it's a lot of fun. However this class has got me to really think about what a story truly is. One of our first assignments was to give our definition of a story and I said this.......

And while I still hold to my original opinion.....somewhat I can't help think there is a possibility I'm missing something. Through my studies I've learned things like "All stories are narratives, but not all narratives are stories" and the different components that make up a story(I.E. the action, the obstacle, the theme, exposition, denouement, and etc). I've also learned according to the dictionary definition of a story, 'Jeff went to the mall' is a story.

Story- an account of incidents or events ( http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/story ). However like the book I'm reading stated though by definition 'Jeff went to the mall' is a story, we don't perceive it as a story. Why is that? Is there really a definition of story? If something is missing components of a story like a resolution is it still a story? Is writing a story an art, science, or both? Are stories that only have impacts on you a story? Can a story be about nothing? What is a story?

If you would like to know the book I have to read for my class (in case you want to look more into this) it's called Story Proof the Science behind the startling power of story by Kendall Haven

Also I think this video by Nostalgia Critic helps with this question
http://youtu.be/6OxCSBw2UTs

So my main question to you fellow people of Crunchyroll is How do you define a story?

I hope that may be I sparked a thought for some of you as to what a story is and maybe caused you to rethink your definition. I also hope you have fun with this topic.

Note: I'll most likely add to this with the more I learn from the class and any new questions that may arise. That can help with your ideas of a story. Also with what I learn I may use it to challenge you to see what else you have to say or may be cause you to see the definition differently.

Note 2: This isn't something like hey guys help me define a story because I can't do it on my own blah blah blah blah blah. You can say it's a bit of experiment to see if there is a "Definition" of story or if there is no real meaning. Also it's kind of a interesting debate topic. Enjoy
20022 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / F / KC
Offline
Posted 9/7/14 , edited 9/7/14
Honestly, I think you hit the nail on the head with a single sentence in your own definition. "There is no real limit on what we can classify as a story." sums up my initial thought pretty well. When we think about stories we generally limit ourselves to words. Aren't paintings telling stories? Of course, they are, but those stories have more implied through the medium. Expanding on that thought I'd say stories help us question the world around us, or allow us to layer our own thoughts into what is being perceived.

We can say "Jeff went to the mall." is a story because we're expressing a self contained concept that can have as little or as much information added in order to express the idea. Having components like introduction, climax, or resolution are all elements of a plot that exist within the story. They aren't necessarily the story itself. With all of that I would say that, yes, a story can be about nothing. Really, what nothing is should be defined by the audience.

I apologize if I went a bit wonky with all of that. I've had too much work and too much class that I'm a little fried. I loved the idea of the topic, so I had to reply anyway.
18054 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
U.S.
Offline
Posted 9/7/14
We can even tell a story amongst men or coworkers by a simple nod or gesture.
Thus, creating the "seamless collaborative guy lie."

Click the video:
You must be logged in to post.