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Japanese words and phrases
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Posted 9/17/14
私は恋してる= I'm in love. But what does the single signs mean? I - love - have is the closest I get. Is there anywhere you can enter the Japanese sentence/word and get it divided into each syllable with an explanation to each one? They all seem to change their meaning acording to the context, and some might only be there as a support for the others.
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Posted 9/17/14

CaelK wrote:
I've said it before: there are right translations and wrong translations, and some translations are better than others, but there is no single best translation. In fact, when you get to a certain point, what makes one translation better than another differs from person to person.

And that's when I stopped freaking out about translating stuff, and started having fun.


What would a translator of official documents say to that? A sentence or a words place in a sentence, can drasticaly change the meaning of the document. The more proficient you get in a language, the better you see how a sentence can change it's meaning, or confuse the reader giving it several possible meanings. The latter is most often seen in the wrong placing of commas. My written English isn't good enough, I just sprinkle some commas around as I feel best gives the sentence the meaning I would like it to have.

How do you translate

Shall we eat grandma?
Shall we eat, grandma?

One single comma changes the meaning of the sentence totaly, will Japanese be able to do the same?
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Posted 9/17/14
Strange moment while watching Cardcaptor Sakura, episode 34 just after the episode title, my lastname shows up as a shop sign.

Living - Salon
Munte

I write my last name Munthe, but it was written Munte 600 years ago.
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Posted 9/17/14

SverreMunthe wrote:

私は恋してる= I'm in love. But what does the single signs mean? I - love - have is the closest I get. Is there anywhere you can enter the Japanese sentence/word and get it divided into each syllable with an explanation to each one? They all seem to change their meaning acording to the context, and some might only be there as a support for the others. :)


If you're using Firefox/Chrome you might want to look into RikaiChan/RikaiKun, like IgnatiusSp mentioned a couple posts back. It's a mouseover app that gives a pop-up translation/reading for the individual word (which may be more than one character long) it's mousing over. It's generally pretty good at figuring out where one word ends and another begins. I think that's the closest to what you described; breaking up syllable-by-syllable wouldn't work because a given character can be more than one syllable (i.e. 私=watashi, 3 syllables; 恋=koi, 2 syllables).
CaelK 
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Posted 9/17/14 , edited 9/17/14

SverreMunthe wrote:What would a translator of official documents say to that? A sentence or a words place in a sentence, can drasticaly change the meaning of the document. The more proficient you get in a language, the better you see how a sentence can change it's meaning, or confuse the reader giving it several possible meanings. The latter is most often seen in the wrong placing of commas. My written English isn't good enough, I just sprinkle some commas around as I feel best gives the sentence the meaning I would like it to have.


True, when you're translating things like... card game rules and card text, you have to be pretty precise. I've done that before, and it requires a different touch than friendly banter.

But if you're translating regular speech, you got a lot more leeway. If a character comes off as snarky and sarcastic to you, then translate his speech in a manner that gets that across. It's not just the words you gotta translate after all, you gotta get that guy's attitude across too. If you're doing card rules, the attitude you gotta get across is that seriously... every word matters. So make them matter.

There's a thought behind all those words, and the better you get at translation, the better you can peel back the words on paper to get to that thought behind it. You just gotta use your intuition.

... But the most useful phrase I've ever seen in a translation? "Where the Japanese and English texts are in conflict, the Japanese text takes precedence." Ha hah!


SverreMunthe wrote:
One single comma changes the meaning of the sentence totaly, will Japanese be able to do the same?


Particles will do this for you, but you might need to rearrange the sentence to make things work out. Parts of speech, and all that.

おばあちゃんを食べましょうか or 食べましょうか、おばあちゃんを
おばあちゃん、食べましょうか or 食べましょうか、おばあちゃん
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