Post Reply Has BAKUMAN Inspired You?
2483 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 9/20/14 , edited 9/20/14
Has BAKUMAN inspired you to draw manga, or draw more of it? Did you want to become a manga artist after reading the manga? Or did the series make you NOT want to draw?

Bakuman has definitely inspired me to get more serious about my manga drawing. It encouraged me to learn more about how to get published, and that it really is a gamble. LUCK.

Do some people think that BAKUMAN made publishing look easy, or did it make it look difficult? Is it all just fantasy?


Don't spoil anything from the series.
37410 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / M / Bellingham WA, USA
Offline
Posted 9/20/14
No, but I had a damn good time watching it. Absolutely awesome and underrated slice of life series!
2450 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M / The heart of Linc...
Offline
Posted 9/29/14 , edited 9/29/14
It helped me inspire to keep at my writing.
47839 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / F / SC
Offline
Posted 9/29/14
it inspired me to stop reading the manga

lol but it was definitely interesting to hear about the manga industry. ^^
391 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
104
Offline
Posted 9/30/14 , edited 10/9/14
Unfortunately, outside of self-publishing, it's more than incredibly unlikely to "become a manga artist" for those outside of Japan. Not only would your drawing skills have to be up to snuff, but you would need to be mostly fluent in Japanese to be able to converse with an editor and/or work with assistants. (Or converse with the author while working as an assistant, like many start out doing) Not to mention the barrier of it being difficult for foreigners to get involved in domestic entertainment in Japan.

(Foreign voice actors, even if fluent in Japanese, are relegated to bit parts and kids shows, since more prominent roles are expected to do promo events in public and there is still a decent amount of xenophobia in Japan.)

In general, you would be looking to go the webcomic artist route: Publish your series online and gain a following, then contract a printery yourself to run off a set of books to sell at conventions or on your website, etc. Assuming you're in the US, there just isn't much at all in the way of a domestic market/culture for comics in the way that Japan does. In the US you basically get hired on by Marvel, DC, et al and draw what they want you to within their same all-inclusive universes they've been milking for decades.
An9el 
29269 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
http://myanimelis...
Offline
Posted 10/8/14
i keep on thinking bakumon instead of bakuman lol stop being dumb brain its not a digimon lol
2483 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 10/9/14

An9el wrote:

i keep on thinking bakumon instead of bakuman lol stop being dumb brain its not a digimon lol


Lol I kept saying Bakugan
xxJing 
40278 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M / Duckburg
Offline
Posted 10/9/14

Maea2016 wrote:

Unfortunately, outside of self-publishing, it's more than incredibly unlikely to "become a manga artist" for those outside of Japan. Not only would your drawing skills have to be up to snuff, but you would need to be mostly fluent in Japanese to be able to converse with an editor and/or work with assistants. (Or converse with the author while working as an assistant, like many start out doing) Not to mention the barrier of it being difficult for foreigners to get involved in domestic entertainment in Japan.

(Foreign voice actors, even if fluent in Japanese, are relegated to bit parts and kids shows, since more prominent roles are expected to do promo events in public and there is still a decent amount of xenophobia in Japan.)

In general, you would be looking to go the webcomic artist route: Publish your series online and gain a following, then contract a printery yourself to run off a set of books to sell at conventions or on your website, etc. Assuming you're in the US, there just isn't much at all in the way of a domestic market/culture for comics in the way that Japan does. In the US you basically get hired on by Marvel, DC, et al and draw what they want you to within their same all-inclusive universes they've been milking for decades.


Well you could publish your comic book through Image Comics. They are pretty much the American equivalent of those Japanese publishers. They take their fee for helping you publish and you retain the rights to royalties or whatever. That is how The Walking Dead was published.

Although in Japan the main problem is that working as a manga artist is not a job, it's self employment. Meaning there is no opportunity for a visa. You are essentially leasing your work to Kodansha or Shueisha who then publish it in their magazines and help you out with getting anime deals and what not. They are more like your agents than your employers. If you knew Japanese and had permanent residency in Japan, then there should be no problem. You could use a pseudonym just like most manga artists do, and you would never have to show your face. The last video that Akira Toriyama appeared in is from like 1982 or something. In every subsequent interview they never show his face. People don't even know who Ohba Tsugumi, the writer of death note and bakuman, is. He uses a pseudonym and keeps his face hidden.

Although personally I would say, if you don't know Japanese and don't live in Japan, try to see if your story could work as a novel. I've recently read a lot of young adult fiction and even the ones that sell well tend to be really corny and written simply. There is a bigger market here for novels than there is for graphic novels. If you really want to draw something, then publish it via Image, Amazon, or whatever. Put it up cheap and advertise it on reddit, facebook, and other forums. If it's good you will slowly develop a following and be able to charge more for subsequent works. If it has a mature theme it may get a movie deal or a tv series deal which will land you more opportunities. The internet is a great place to make money, you just have to have a product people will want and know how to market it. You don't necessarily have to rely on big publishers anymore like you did before the internet exploded. I mean friggin look at Youtube, there are a crap load of people who make close to if not more than 6 figures just by playing minecraft. Granted that takes improvisational and speaking skills, but all that really means is that you have to train yourself to be an extrovert. The important part here is marketing though, making sure people know your product exists and making them want to try it and recommend it to friends. So if you were to go this route I would say pick up some business and marketing books and do a little research.
391 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
104
Offline
Posted 10/9/14
YA fiction novel is probably a better bet in the US, yeah. Someone posted some Nielson stats the other day that showed the average manga sells 1400 copies ... not exactly enough to make more than gas money from.

And are you sure all manga authors are considered self-employed? It was my understanding that with Shueisha at least, they held some sort of rights over your series. Hence why they can cancel you, and you aren't allowed to just take your series to another publisher, or finish it online etc. It is pseudo-freelance, but seemed more like you get locked into one publisher and then it becomes work-for-hire as long as they want to keep you going. They get you an office, help hire you assistants, etc.
32 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M
Offline
Posted 10/9/14
Wasn't really a true hard core fan but I guess it was a little.
215 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Restless Dream
Offline
Posted 6/21/15 , edited 1/6/16
Inspired to stop dreaming and actually do something.
Posted 6/21/15
no
4046 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
117 / M
Offline
Posted 6/27/15
Wait there's an anime of bakuman? I've been buying the books
You must be logged in to post.