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Aspergers Syndrome
Posted 10/2/14 , edited 10/2/14
I hope I do, but I won't bother getting tested as psychologists and psychiatrists are generally illiterate and incapable drones who don't know how to apply what they learn. A girl who was my friend's girlfriend was a psychotic sociopath with AS, and she was certain that I was an "Aspie" like her. I think I have a natural attraction towards people with AS as they tend to be intelligent.
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Posted 10/2/14

SuzumeAkihana wrote:


flixstix wrote:

i was diagnosed with Autism ( Asperger's ) i think when i was Around 9, currently 15 now, most kids with aspeger's aren't really social, others are, Kids who have Autism tend to have different interests than others ( very proud that i like anime ), I love that i'm autistic, lots of doctors tell me i think totally different than other "normal" kids xD to solve a problem like; in a maze, most kids go a certain way, while i go a completely different way. Also I'm incredibly good at physics, C++, and school at my age.

Surprising fact is that;Albert Einstein was considered to have Aspergers :D, wierd huh?.


I've found that like math. ^-^ It's pretty fun when I understand (whenever I don't I want to throw something or bang my head against a wall) and I think I do pretty well with perception/noticing things.

What messes me up with school is my large sum of absences; If it wasn't for that I'd have higher grades/GPA.

Oh! Also just remembered: I seem to also have a love of detective things/solving mysteries and riddles. There was an ARG somewhere not too long ago and I managed to figure some stuff out and it made me pretty happy when people used my clues.


You should try programming. You might like that if you like solving math problems, but you might get addicted if you do end up liking it.
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Posted 10/2/14
I have aspergers syndrome
Vodash 
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Posted 10/2/14

applestash wrote:

I hope I do, but I won't bother getting tested as psychologists and psychiatrists are generally illiterate and incapable drones who don't know how to apply what they learn. A girl who was my friend's girlfriend was a psychotic sociopath with AS, and she was certain that I was an "Aspie" like her. I think I have a natural attraction towards people with AS as they tend to be intelligent.


I, too, wish for debilitating mental diseases.
Posted 10/2/14

Vodash wrote:


applestash wrote:

I hope I do, but I won't bother getting tested as psychologists and psychiatrists are generally illiterate and incapable drones who don't know how to apply what they learn. A girl who was my friend's girlfriend was a psychotic sociopath with AS, and she was certain that I was an "Aspie" like her. I think I have a natural attraction towards people with AS as they tend to be intelligent.


I, too, wish for debilitating mental diseases.


Debilitating, huh? Explain further.
Vodash 
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Posted 10/2/14 , edited 10/2/14

applestash wrote:


Vodash wrote:


applestash wrote:

I hope I do, but I won't bother getting tested as psychologists and psychiatrists are generally illiterate and incapable drones who don't know how to apply what they learn. A girl who was my friend's girlfriend was a psychotic sociopath with AS, and she was certain that I was an "Aspie" like her. I think I have a natural attraction towards people with AS as they tend to be intelligent.


I, too, wish for debilitating mental diseases.


Debilitating, huh? Explain further.


"Debilitating, adjective - (of a disease or condition) making someone very weak and infirm."

Possibly not the best word to use, but it kind of fits as AS is characterized by severe social difficulties, therefore making someone very weak in social aspects.

Posted 10/3/14

Vodash wrote:

"Debilitating, adjective - (of a disease or condition) making someone very weak and infirm."

Possibly not the best word to use, but it kind of fits as AS is characterized by severe social difficulties, therefore making someone very weak in social aspects.


1.) Explain in your own words why a musician with AS who garners hundreds of thousands of fans across the nation would prefer to have "social skills" over her superior musical talent which brought upon fame for her across the nation and enough wealth to support her for the rest of her life.

2.) Explain in your own words why a specialized IT Technician who has his own private room in the corner of a firm would prefer to have "social skills" over his superior intellect and specialization, when his only moments of social interaction are when his non-techy coworkers need to figure out how to open a Microsoft document. While his coworkers are in fear of being replaced, his job is secure due to the country's high demand in IT specialists.

These are two accounts of people I've met with AS, and they seemed to be doing fine. How's your social skills helping your life, neurotypical?
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Posted 10/3/14

Vodash wrote:


I, too, wish for debilitating mental diseases.


finally some one that can see that being "diagnosed" with ***-burgers the equivalent to receiving a gold start
and yes being a "true" aspergers is debilitating, i myself have seen two lose there jobs because... well basicly because they were socially retarded and saying things you shouldn't have said in public (be it as funny as hell to watch tho(kinda like a living B/ borad))
Posted 10/3/14

Vodash wrote:


applestash wrote:

I hope I do, but I won't bother getting tested as psychologists and psychiatrists are generally illiterate and incapable drones who don't know how to apply what they learn. A girl who was my friend's girlfriend was a psychotic sociopath with AS, and she was certain that I was an "Aspie" like her. I think I have a natural attraction towards people with AS as they tend to be intelligent.


I, too, wish for debilitating mental diseases.


Fucking hilarious.
Vodash 
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Posted 10/3/14

applestash wrote:


Vodash wrote:

"Debilitating, adjective - (of a disease or condition) making someone very weak and infirm."

Possibly not the best word to use, but it kind of fits as AS is characterized by severe social difficulties, therefore making someone very weak in social aspects.


1.) Explain in your own words why a musician with AS who garners hundreds of thousands of fans across the nation would prefer to have "social skills" over her superior musical talent which brought upon fame for her across the nation and enough wealth to support her for the rest of her life.

2.) Explain in your own words why a specialized IT Technician who has his own private room in the corner of a firm would prefer to have "social skills" over his superior intellect and specialization, when his only moments of social interaction are when his non-techy coworkers need to figure out how to open a Microsoft document. While his coworkers are in fear of being replaced, his job is secure due to the country's high demand in IT specialists.

These are two accounts of people I've met with AS, and they seemed to be doing fine. How's your social skills helping your life, neurotypical?


Firstly, there's no point in numbering these cases because you're asking the same thing with both of them.

To respond to your examples however, while it's great that these people have earned success despite their illnesses, can't you see that they would have many more opportunities in life if they didn't have AS? Sure, if having AS forced someone into a profession that they love and are successful in, that's fantastic. But what about all the other people who struggle to find a profession that they enjoy because their illness prevents them from doing it? All the people that have to depend on others their whole life because they just can't handle their disease?

You seem to treat AS as something beneficial and it somehow makes you a better person if you suffer from it, which is completely insane.

Also at the end of your post where you discriminate against "neurotypicals" just shows that your reasoning is inherently flawed.
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Posted 10/3/14 , edited 10/3/14
Self-diagnosis is stupid and doesn't count. I know a guy who actually has it (not self-diagnosed) and unless your behavior is like what I'm about to describe, you're probably either possessed of a much milder form or you don't have it.

Seriously, why are people CONTESTING EXPERTS when they themselves are much younger with less experience (and less life experience) and armed only with generic Google knowledge obtained from a 5-minute search? It is like creating a new character in some RPG and immediately trying to fight the final boss. People tend to not realize that they don't know crap compared to people who have spent many years devoted to the studies and have clinical experience to back up their assertions. It is like a grain of sand on the ****ing beach trying to fight the waves. Seriously. Don't do it. You don't learn to swim by reading a book. You don't understand just because you have some knowledge.

Posted 10/3/14

Vodash wrote:

Also at the end of your post where you discriminate against "neurotypicals" just shows that your reasoning is inherently flawed.


If you paid proper attention to the post, you may have noticed that there was no particular "reasoning" involved. It was simply asking you to explain the objective value of social skills over specialization and/or intelligence associated with AS.
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Posted 10/3/14 , edited 10/3/14
My entire family has been diagnosed as high functioning Aspergers syndrome. If there is ever a question, odds are I can answer it. I have been helping to inform many people about the condition. The problem however is that it seems to be the new buzzword in the medical field, much like ADD and ADHD were a few years ago. This causes several problems. One being misdiagnosis, and one being the fact that the media will label any violent occurrence on the syndrome.
There are also almost ALWAYS side conditions that come along with Aspergers. These often include things like ADD and OCD, but are not exclusive.

Also another misnomer is that all people with this can't feel. If anything, the opposite is true. Aspergers individuals often tend to by hyper sensitive to any stimuli. This can include sounds, visuals, and even emotions. That's why externally we can often be seen as mute to others because we have to block things. People with this condition also have the tend to be brilliant in many ways that people without AS don't understand or don't see. Even those that are considered low functioning and can't get through the basic daily life without assistance are incredible brilliant.

There is also a huge spectrum that can come with this as well. My twin sister (as well as my mother) can easily recognize social cues and signals, but she would much rather not deal with people unless she has to. She is fine with a few friends, books, and art. They can't look people in the eyes, but instead look above at their foreheads. They dislike being touched by people and only will accept if from others that are super close (such as family)
My brother on the other hand is the complete opposite where he wants to be a social butterfly, but he cannot read social cues. We have had to tell him on multiple occasions that someone did not want to talk to him and were politely trying to turn him down, but he can't see it unless someone tells him directly.

I have so much more I could say on the topic. Having lived with and around this my entire life.

I would also suggest reading a book (for those interested) Called Look Me in the Eyes: My life with Aspergers by Elder Robinson. It shows the difficulties as well as the brilliance that come with being an ASPY
Vodash 
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Posted 10/3/14

applestash wrote:


Vodash wrote:

Also at the end of your post where you discriminate against "neurotypicals" just shows that your reasoning is inherently flawed.


If you paid proper attention to the post, you may have noticed that there was no particular "reasoning" involved. It was simply asking you to explain the objective value of social skills over specialization and/or intelligence associated with AS.


The problem with what you're asking is that they are very particular cases. What about other cases where the individual has AS and has quite literally no specialization because of it? In those cases the objective value of social skills is infinitely greater than specialization because they have none.

I also never questioned the intelligence of a person with AS, so that's irrelevant.

It's really the fundamental personality and interests of a person that decide how important certain skills will be compared to others. You're speaking in particulars which doesn't speak for the whole of people with AS, so it's ultimately pointless to discuss.
Posted 10/3/14

Vodash wrote:

The problem with what you're asking is that they are very particular cases. What about other cases where the individual has AS and has quite literally no specialization because of it? In those cases the objective value of social skills is infinitely greater than specialization because they have none.

I also never questioned the intelligence of a person with AS, so that's irrelevant.

It's really the fundamental personality and interests of a person that decide how important certain skills will be compared to others. You're speaking in particulars which doesn't speak for the whole of people with AS, so it's ultimately pointless to discuss.


Funny. When something has an objective value, it tends to apply to all individuals universally. Yet you claim that it doesn't apply to the individuals in my example. Are you okay?
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