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Golden Time aftereffects [dem feels]
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Posted 10/11/14 , edited 10/11/14

iblessall wrote:


Gafennec wrote:


What is this witchcraft


Normal people would call it a flow chart of emotional connections. I guess you can call it witchcraft.

But to answer the question did Linda hit Banri with the moped is answered in Episode 6: Yes and No. Linda flat out asks Banri if it was her fault because she didn't make it in time. TADA.. solid proof Linda Hayashida is innocent of all charges leveled against her. In the same episode we learned Banri must have failed the entrance exams to university because if Linda had said yes; he would have gone to a Tokyo prep school.

Edit: This episode alone shows screwed up (emotionally) Koko, Linda and Banri are. That they all have happy outcomes is remarkable.
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Posted 10/11/14

GoldTStar wrote:

Koko. Does. Not. Love. Banri.



Truth.



And I am surprised by the thought by some that G.T. is a more "mature" or "complicated" look at love when it seems to be entirely based on how soap-opera worthy the story and character motivations are.
Netjak 
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Posted 10/11/14

cjkupers wrote:

While I am a fan of romance and drama, I also am kind of curious if there have been other series that are more down to earth like Golden Time that focus on other motifs and themes rather than just romance... If you know any, please suggest some!


I would suggest watching The Pet Girl Of Sakurasou, it's a really good romance with deeper underlying themes. It however is not as "grown up" as Golden Time, but regardless a great watch.
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Posted 10/11/14
...............Yeah, people who like G.T. seem to like Pet Girl, and it sorta makes sense. So, if you did like G.T., you'd probs like Pet Girl.
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Posted 10/11/14

maxgale wrote:


GoldTStar wrote:

Koko. Does. Not. Love. Banri.



Truth.



And I am surprised by the thought by some that G.T. is a more "mature" or "complicated" look at love when it seems to be entirely based on how soap-opera worthy the story and character motivations are.


Well, imo other series ive seena nd am currently watching don't show as much character growth as GT... Usually endings of these shows are resolved by the "two" ending up finally realizing their love and indulging in it to satisfy the viewer. I find that to be a cheap cop-out way of writing a story's ending.

In GT, the relationships begin early, but develop with very clear and understandable dynamics throughout the story, which is what makes it so emotionally gripping-- the viewer feels and sympathizes with the same emotions the characters experience. In most stories, the viewer is only left or strung along wishing the characters would admit their feelings. In one example, you get to experience a parallel in their emotional change, and in the other example, you simply wait and wish for them to indulge in their inevitable conjoining.

And then there are implied dynamics in the writing. The strongest example would be when Koko begins to push away Banri. At times, it is almost very very convincing that she actually wants nothing more to do with him, given all the trouble they have gone through. But a little bit through it, you understand that she is doing it to protect him and herself from destroying what they had. Better to preserve than to ruin. While it is all unveiling, I'm sure the viewer sympathizes even more with it because we've all had those experiences before in our own lives.

So yes, I do believe the nature of love portrayed in GT is in fact more complicated and mature than what you'd normally see in an anime. I think the derivation of "soap-opera-ey" quality is more of a stereotype in this case. Not saying the series is not a soap-opera, but to generalize it that way would discredit what it has to offer in its entirety.

I see most of the shocking events that occur in the story only served to further develop backstory or provide insight into the characters. One example would be when Koko gets in the accident, her father backhands her, and she spends days sulking in her room when Banri confronts her with a potent dialogue/scene. I wouldn't just say that's all just drama, it also tests the characters and what they are made of when they decide how to move on from their accident, and it kind of paints a picture of why Koko is so insecure in the way that she is. ( a tough but very loving father who only wants whats best for her, given a privileged lifestyle but not really spoiled... you might be able to say that she takes it upon herself to live up to expectations. )

I digress.. But that's what I mean when I said that the writing is quite good. There are little nuances here and there that really subtly build over one another to create something that is much better than just an entertaining anime. :)

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Posted 10/11/14

Netjak wrote:


cjkupers wrote:

While I am a fan of romance and drama, I also am kind of curious if there have been other series that are more down to earth like Golden Time that focus on other motifs and themes rather than just romance... If you know any, please suggest some!


I would suggest watching The Pet Girl Of Sakurasou, it's a really good romance with deeper underlying themes. It however is not as "grown up" as Golden Time, but regardless a great watch.


I am currently 1/2 through Toradora, but I will most definitely queue up Pet Girl. Thank you all for the really good suggestions. I'm enjoying them, even if my expectations are a little bit high.

These are really good and fair suggestions though. When I get a recommendation, I watch the first episode just to get an idea, and if its really good I watch the second episode and go back to my current queued show to finish it.

I had already started toradora, and then started watching clannad.. but then chose to finish toradora first.. woo! this list is building well enough.


my opinions on Toradora..

It is enjoyable and very light in tone. Its apparent that the story does not try to sink the claws in and really confront some underlying topics. In ways, that's both good and not so good. I think it's just right. But in no way does it beat Golden Time! :3

I may have to take a short break and watch something like death note... psycho-pass, or just rewatch the forest part of AoT to reground my reality hahahahaha....

But really, thanks for putting out some great words and suggestions guys!
Netjak 
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Posted 10/11/14
If i think of anything else i will let you know good sir!
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Posted 10/11/14

cjkupers wrote:
I am currently 1/2 through Toradora, but I will most definitely queue up Pet Girl. Thank you all for the really good suggestions. I'm enjoying them, even if my expectations are a little bit high.


I would also highly recommend Pet Girl. It is gripping and moving and has very similar character growth to that of Golden Time. I agree with your analysis of GT btw, nice summation of its strengths.
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Posted 10/11/14

cjkupers wrote:


maxgale wrote:


GoldTStar wrote:

Koko. Does. Not. Love. Banri.



Truth.



And I am surprised by the thought by some that G.T. is a more "mature" or "complicated" look at love when it seems to be entirely based on how soap-opera worthy the story and character motivations are.


Well, imo other series ive seena nd am currently watching don't show as much character growth as GT... Usually endings of these shows are resolved by the "two" ending up finally realizing their love and indulging in it to satisfy the viewer. I find that to be a cheap cop-out way of writing a story's ending.

In GT, the relationships begin early, but develop with very clear and understandable dynamics throughout the story, which is what makes it so emotionally gripping-- the viewer feels and sympathizes with the same emotions the characters experience
. In most stories, the viewer is only left or strung along wishing the characters would admit their feelings. In one example, you get to experience a parallel in their emotional change, and in the other example, you simply wait and wish for them to indulge in their inevitable conjoining.

And then there are implied dynamics in the writing. The strongest example would be when Koko begins to push away Banri. At times, it is almost very very convincing that she actually wants nothing more to do with him, given all the trouble they have gone through. But a little bit through it, you understand that she is doing it to protect him and herself from destroying what they had. Better to preserve than to ruin. While it is all unveiling, I'm sure the viewer sympathizes even more with it because we've all had those experiences before in our own lives.

So yes, I do believe the nature of love portrayed in GT is in fact more complicated and mature than what you'd normally see in an anime. I think the derivation of "soap-opera-ey" quality is more of a stereotype in this case. Not saying the series is not a soap-opera, but to generalize it that way would discredit what it has to offer in its entirety.

I see most of the shocking events that occur in the story only served to further develop backstory or provide insight into the characters. One example would be when Koko gets in the accident, her father backhands her, and she spends days sulking in her room when Banri confronts her with a potent dialogue/scene. I wouldn't just say that's all just drama, it also tests the characters and what they are made of when they decide how to move on from their accident, and it kind of paints a picture of why Koko is so insecure in the way that she is. ( a tough but very loving father who only wants whats best for her, given a privileged lifestyle but not really spoiled... you might be able to say that she takes it upon herself to live up to expectations. )

I digress.. But that's what I mean when I said that the writing is quite good. There are little nuances here and there that really subtly build over one another to create something that is much better than just an entertaining anime. :)





Re: bolded


Which is how G.T. ended?..........

I am not sure how much one is expected to relate to Koko or Banri. They are fundamentally terrible people. I do not mean that in the sense that they are flawed, etc. I mean they are written as if G.T. were another high school rom-com. Anyone behaving like that in their 20s is an idiot, a narcissist, or both.

I prefer anime that allows for subtlety in writing and character dynamics. None of that was to be found in G.T. What we have is a classic tsundere. She's more in love with herself than the object of her crush. That is why she pushes him away. She never does anything which makes her mature beyond the classic tsundere trope, which is rather odd considering that the same author was able to create one of the modern classic tsundere characters in Taiga. "She's a tsundere who never comes to actually have any -dere" could be one argument, which might display some originality, but that is to overlook how the classic tsundere never really has any true "-dere", it is all about the love of themselves as I previously stated. There is no subtlety in the writing: anything that might possibly go unnoticed by the audience is narrated by the cloyingly cheap and pedantic plot device of "Ghost Banri."

That is another classic character cliche. One of the things I disliked most about G.T. was that instead of having characters evolve due to the narrative, and the characters evolve the narrative, it was satisfied with saying, "Two cliches instead of one makes a meaningful character."

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Posted 10/11/14 , edited 10/11/14
I didn't really see the ending of G.T focused so much on them finally being together so much as Banri finally pulling through and not losing what he already had. They were in love for most of the show, it's not like we were being denied that satisfaction as a stringalong method to stay hooked.

I don't really agree with the notion that its hard to see how one can relate to the characters. They go through a lot of changes that are not unheard of or unnatural. While the characters, personalities, and their behavior are quite abnormal in comparison to reality, the decision making process that is evident in the story between each of the characters is very real, and does happen in real life.

As for downing on use of cliches, I believe that any modern piece of writing will ultimately have to resort to touching on some basic cliches at one point or another. That's the whole point of modern satire and drama, and its roots in commedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commedia_dell%27arte

I don't quite see how ghost banri was a narrative for what was obvious. It was pretty clear that new banri really wanted to be with Koko. Ghost banri's manifestations were somewhat hostile and take-overish, and when we saw voice-over clips of ghost banri, it was more of an ominous looming predator waiting for his chance to make his play in order to fulfill his own completely separate agenda-- making ghost banri a separate character from new banri. Ghost banri was more there to provide the antihero antagonist to help develop the story. The main struggle is Banri overcoming his condition, and making the right decisions in spite of his condition, not just a pick-and-choose love triangle battle that ultimately ends in the series ending. (while it may seem like that, there is a more powerful message in this story than just plain love triangles.)

and you can't really describe Koko as the tsundere type. She doesn't start hostile and grows lovey dovey.. Shes nothing BUT lovey dovey. The act of distancing oneself from someone they love after the fact is usually an act of deeper love. It's made up of a lot of different feelings. Fear, and trying to save oneself from feeling the pain of seeing their loved one disappear, self preservation or need to keep oneself composed, and a sense of protection over banri to ensure the same thing doesn't happen between her and banri than what happened with Linda.
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Posted 10/13/14
I'm working on a new idea about the 'Ghost' Banri. I'm thinking it is less a full personality split than an embodiment of his fears, regrets and insecurities. and wants. The proverbial 'Monster of the Id' as seen in Forbidden Planet. Exhibit A: Linda describing the old Banri was exactly the same as the new Banri. (Kind and funny, etc.) Exhibit B: The ghost Banri changed from silent observer to vengeful spirit when its desires/wants were not met. And it had a SINGULAR purpose; to get Linda to be in love with him. Exhibit C: The ghost Banri did not show up in the home time even when Banri was talking to Linda. It only showed up when he became attracted to Koko. Exhibit D: It still showed up after both sets of memories were integrated so it was something 'more' than just old personality. Exhibit E: it was only mollified, in the last episode, when Linda gave it an answer it could accept so that all the fears, regrets, etc from the previous years were erased.

To sum up: While Banri was lying on the ground after the accident his subconscious thought it was going to die without receiving an answer. So that the Id monster/ghost Banri was created to preserve the life till he could get an answer, but in doing so it closed the door on the memories (law of unintended consequences) and wiped the slate clean as it was.
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