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Marriage
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Posted 10/12/14
Sure? Why not. Not at this age of course. Gay, straight, interracial, arranged (some people who I've known go down this route end up happy) = YES.
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Posted 10/12/14

Sogno- wrote:

yes i really want to be married. and have kids. and have a house... with a decent kitchen. and a garden. I'd make a good housewife


Do cats get aids?

I've seen stray cats that are too promiscuous and they are just okay.
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Posted 10/12/14

Hayagriva wrote:

I understand what you're saying about expectations. My own are ridiculous. What I was pointing out was that having high standards of even simple friendship, much less romance, means you need MORE exposure to people, not less. It would be like saying you want your romantic partner to have blue eyes and blonde hair, and then staying at home all day and wondering why you weren't meeting them. You lost the argument because you were talking about standards, which was not the original discussion. You made that spinoff, and I don't like to veer off subject like that, nor do I respect anyone who does.

The original discussion was the FACT that you never know where you are going to meet a person, and how or what they will come to represent in your life. If you have strict social screenings, then fine. But that means you need MORE people to screen, not LESS. If you don't, that's also fine - but don't bitch about the results. This is a brick wall of reality that many people bash their heads against. My original comment about your age is you can't know what it's like to have known someone from a random instance who has drastically influenced your life for more than a couple of years, because you haven't existed long enough. If that offends you, I won't hide how much that amuses me or how bad you should feel about how much a simple fact makes you angry.

Going out every day into a big city and trying to meet someone in person is actually LESS random than the internet, because of the number of people you are dealing with. Basic statistics.

In other words, there are 15.5 million eHarmony members. I doubt there are that many people within a hundred miles of where any of us live. Even if they're all single on a website, going to meetup groups or places where the kind of people you want to meet would be (for romantic reasons or otherwise) is far, FAR less random than the internet. If you draw associations to where you are going with personality types, it's even less random than I just projected. Even people in their 20's don't seem to know this. I know someone who's older than me who never got it either.


I didn't make that spinoff. That's what you were implying in your first post. You said you're ok with devoting yourself to the right girl but then you said you won't bother to even look for her. My first post was to clarify if you believed that people should just settle for a random person and say she's the right girl instead of someone who they've actually put time and effort into looking for since that's what you appeared to have been implying. If you leave everything up to chance, you'll almost never find the girl you're meant to be with if you don't care enough to find someone who you're compatible with. That's the whole point of having certain expectations of people when determining whether or not they're the one you want to devote yourself to. If you want a relationship but you don't go out to look for someone who you think would be an ideal partner, you shouldn't be complaining about being single or being in the wrong relationship that will most likely leave you miserable if you don't end it soon. Maybe marrying the perfect girl isn't at the top of your agenda and isn't that important to you right now, but I was mostly talking about people in general and what you believe people should/shouldn't do.

I think I'm getting mixed messages from you. On one hand you say people who want a relationship should go out and meet more people instead of limiting themselves to less people. But then when I say that people who want a relationship should search for the person they think is right for them, you spend the rest of your argument trying to say I'm wrong and that they shouldn't make an effort to meet someone they think would be an ideal partner for them. What exactly are you trying to say?

About the age part, I wasn't offended by it. I was only saying that my age is irrelevant in this discussion. You can't exactly tell what kind of experiences someone has had or hasn't had from just looking at their age (aside from obvious things like puberty, drinking, etc.).

Also, how in the world is meeting someone online less random than meeting someone in person? When you're online, you can just type "brown hair, bachelor's degree, interests include swimming" and you'll find someone right away. When you step out your door, you'll probably see hundreds of random people in a single day before coming across someone who fits your criteria and even then you might not know that they're who you're looking for. The internet is more specific, not random.
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Posted 10/12/14

DivinePrince wrote:


Aura-chan wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:

Marriage is a stupid waste of money and paper-work. No thanks.



I am fine with having a partner, and we can devote our lives and our love to each-other WITHOUT the complicated mess of money and arrangements and legally binding documents.


to some people it means much more and means a lot to them so its not stupid...

if its not for you its not for you but just because you dont like the idea doesnt mean it is stupid >_<

you dont know how youll feel about things in 5-10+ years time. You might meet someone that marriage is important to, and decide to do it because it means a lot to them or you may change how you feel about it

you just dont know



I don't think you really know what you're talking about, so I am just going to go on my merry way.

PS: Using passive-aggressive smileys makes you look like a 13 year old.


What's your problem?

I didnt attack you but you attacked me...

I only pointed out that what may be stupid to you can mean a lot to someone else and people can change their mind as they get older.

I have friends who didnt believe in marriage who later changed their minds and I have had friends who will continue to not believe in marriage.

What may seem like a silly piece of paper and unromantic to some means so much more to others. Everyone is different.

I wouldnt say people are stupid for not getting married its just what they want, but people arent stupid for getting married either.

Marriage is important to my husband and I, it dsnt mean were more committed than a couple who doesnt get married, but its something we both believe in.



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Posted 10/12/14

Aura-chan wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:


Aura-chan wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:

Marriage is a stupid waste of money and paper-work. No thanks.



I am fine with having a partner, and we can devote our lives and our love to each-other WITHOUT the complicated mess of money and arrangements and legally binding documents.


to some people it means much more and means a lot to them so its not stupid...

if its not for you its not for you but just because you dont like the idea doesnt mean it is stupid >_<

you dont know how youll feel about things in 5-10+ years time. You might meet someone that marriage is important to, and decide to do it because it means a lot to them or you may change how you feel about it

you just dont know



I don't think you really know what you're talking about, so I am just going to go on my merry way.

PS: Using passive-aggressive smileys makes you look like a 13 year old.


What's your problem?

I didnt attack you but you attacked me...

I only pointed out that what may be stupid to you can mean a lot to someone else and people can change their mind as they get older.

I have friends who didnt believe in marriage who later changed their minds and I have had friends who will continue to not believe in marriage.

What may seem like a silly piece of paper and unromantic to some means so much more to others. Everyone is different.

I wouldnt say people are stupid for not getting married its just what they want, but people arent stupid for getting married either.

Marriage is important to my husband and I, it dsnt mean were more committed than a couple who doesnt get married, but its something we both believe in.





How interesting.
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Posted 10/12/14


Now I agree with you, but I think you shouldn't argue with this guy because his argument seems invalid on multiple levels.
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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 10/12/14

PhantomGundam wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:

I understand what you're saying about expectations. My own are ridiculous. What I was pointing out was that having high standards of even simple friendship, much less romance, means you need MORE exposure to people, not less. It would be like saying you want your romantic partner to have blue eyes and blonde hair, and then staying at home all day and wondering why you weren't meeting them. You lost the argument because you were talking about standards, which was not the original discussion. You made that spinoff, and I don't like to veer off subject like that, nor do I respect anyone who does.

The original discussion was the FACT that you never know where you are going to meet a person, and how or what they will come to represent in your life. If you have strict social screenings, then fine. But that means you need MORE people to screen, not LESS. If you don't, that's also fine - but don't bitch about the results. This is a brick wall of reality that many people bash their heads against. My original comment about your age is you can't know what it's like to have known someone from a random instance who has drastically influenced your life for more than a couple of years, because you haven't existed long enough. If that offends you, I won't hide how much that amuses me or how bad you should feel about how much a simple fact makes you angry.

Going out every day into a big city and trying to meet someone in person is actually LESS random than the internet, because of the number of people you are dealing with. Basic statistics.

In other words, there are 15.5 million eHarmony members. I doubt there are that many people within a hundred miles of where any of us live. Even if they're all single on a website, going to meetup groups or places where the kind of people you want to meet would be (for romantic reasons or otherwise) is far, FAR less random than the internet. If you draw associations to where you are going with personality types, it's even less random than I just projected. Even people in their 20's don't seem to know this. I know someone who's older than me who never got it either.


I didn't make that spinoff. That's what you were implying in your first post. You said you're ok with devoting yourself to the right girl but then you said you won't bother to even look for her. My first post was to clarify if you believed that people should just settle for a random person and say she's the right girl instead of someone who they've actually put time and effort into looking for since that's what you appeared to have been implying. If you leave everything up to chance, you'll almost never find the girl you're meant to be with if you don't care enough to find someone who you're compatible with. That's the whole point of having certain expectations of people when determining whether or not they're the one you want to devote yourself to. If you want a relationship but you don't go out to look for someone who you think would be an ideal partner, you shouldn't be complaining about being single or being in the wrong relationship that will most likely leave you miserable if you don't end it soon. Maybe marrying the perfect girl isn't at the top of your agenda and isn't that important to you right now, but I was mostly talking about people in general and what you believe people should/shouldn't do.

I think I'm getting mixed messages from you. On one hand you say people who want a relationship should go out and meet more people instead of limiting themselves to less people. But then when I say that people who want a relationship should search for the person they think is right for them, you spend the rest of your argument trying to say I'm wrong and that they shouldn't make an effort to meet someone they think would be an ideal partner for them. What exactly are you trying to say?

About the age part, I wasn't offended by it. I was only saying that my age is irrelevant in this discussion. You can't exactly tell what kind of experiences someone has had or hasn't had from just looking at their age (aside from obvious things like puberty, drinking, etc.).

Also, how in the world is meeting someone online less random than meeting someone in person? When you're online, you can just type "brown hair, bachelor's degree, interests include swimming" and you'll find someone right away. When you step out your door, you'll probably see hundreds of random people in a single day before coming across someone who fits your criteria and even then you might not know that they're who you're looking for. The internet is more specific, not random.


Let's retrace our steps.

The original post of the thread: I want to get married, but I don't want my family OR the internet to set me up.

My response: You shouldn't close doors like that. Not if you really want to be married. Or, learn to live with the consequences of closing doors.

Your response: You shouldn't tell the OP to just marry some random person. They should have standards.

My response: o.O We... weren't even talking about that. And I did not imply it in any shape or form.


I have been facepalming ever since.


And no, the internet is more random, because there is a greater volume of people with more randomized variables regardless of the search medium. While I personally think you would be attracted to the more important parts FIRST since physical attraction isn't initially part of the equation, and the internet facilitates this rather well, you will always be able to tell more about a person through a personal conversation than an internet chat.

Should you believe otherwise, that's just something you tell yourself to make you feel better about your choices. It's your own demon, which doesn't interest me at all.

Your age matters in the sense that when you're out of high school, and out of college, you are no longer having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. Statistically, most people marry someone they found through their job. Meeting people isn't nearly the same dynamic after, and it's not an experience you COULD have had yet. When you reach that stage in your life, you're a lot more appreciative of random connections.

You also conveniently ignored another point I had made - the inarguable fact that with ANY set of standards, the more people you pass through the screen, the more likely you will find people you want to keep in your life. If you disagree with that, that's fine, but don't make your social laziness another person's problem.

You misquoted several other things. Out of sheer curiosity: is English your first language? Because it's the only time I've had these weird off-kilter arguments.
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15 / F / Murica
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Posted 10/12/14
On the topic of marriage, my brother is getting married soon. I'm so happy for him!
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Posted 10/12/14

QuietlyLoud wrote:

On the topic of marriage, my brother is getting married soon. I'm so happy for him!


Congratulations to your brother and his wife to be :)
Hope you enjoy the wedding and they have many happy years together
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Posted 10/12/14 , edited 10/12/14

DivinePrince wrote:

Exactly.

I love the idea of being in a long, love-filled relationship because you WANT to; not because you're bound by a bunch of stupid papers and a fee of $50 000.



Sounds like you associate marriage with all of that paperwork instead of with that it's actually suppose to signify. Marriage is a step in your relationship that you take because it's a sign that you love this person enough to dedicate the rest of your life to them. The paperwork and money nonsense is just to make it easier for the courts and so the government has a more accurate census of people living together. It has more to do with government than with your actual relationship. In other words, marriage is living the rest of your life with someone who you actually want to be with. You don't have the long relationship because you're bound by papers (which is what your idea of marriage seems to be). You get the papers because you love your partner enough to show them you're willing to be with them forever. I hope this made sense.


Hayagriva wrote:


Let's retrace our steps.

The original post of the thread: I want to get married, but I don't want my family OR the internet to set me up.

My response: You shouldn't close doors like that. Not if you really want to be married. Or, learn to live with the consequences of closing doors.

Your response: You shouldn't tell the OP to just marry some random person. They should have standards.

My response: o.O We... weren't even talking about that. And I did not imply it in any shape or form.


I have been facepalming ever since.


And no, the internet is more random, because there is a greater volume of people with more randomized variables regardless of the search medium. While I personally think you would be attracted to the more important parts FIRST since physical attraction isn't initially part of the equation, and the internet facilitates this rather well, you will always be able to tell more about a person through a personal conversation than an internet chat.

Should you believe otherwise, that's just something you tell yourself to make you feel better about your choices. It's your own demon, which doesn't interest me at all.

Your age matters in the sense that when you're out of high school, and out of college, you are no longer having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. Statistically, most people marry someone they found through their job. Meeting people isn't nearly the same dynamic after, and it's not an experience you COULD have had yet. When you reach that stage in your life, you're a lot more appreciative of random connections.

You also conveniently ignored another point I had made - the inarguable fact that with ANY set of standards, the more people you pass through the screen, the more likely you will find people you want to keep in your life. If you disagree with that, that's fine, but don't make your social laziness another person's problem.

You misquoted several other things. Out of sheer curiosity: is English your first language? Because it's the only time I've had these weird off-kilter arguments.


Your first post has several parts. I already told you which part I was questioning you about and you ignored it. You've been facepalming at a guy whose been trying to clarify your mistakes. If you insist that you weren't implying what I thought you were implying, I'm sorry but you really should have made your posts a lot clearer. Every time you reply to me your posts get more jumbled up. It was hard to tell what your point is since you keep saying one thing and then disagreeing with it when I say it.

My age has absolutely nothing to do with what you just said. Even when you're out of college and have a job, you're still having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. It's not like you're going to have a new set of co-workers every week or everyone else in your neighborhood gets replaced when a new neighbor moves in. You're going to have random people thrown into your lives for long periods of time no matter what your age is. And where did you get such a statistic from? I highly doubt over 50% of marriages are between people who met at work. Marriages happen all the time between people who met in college, in high school (although this one is rare), in the neighborhood, overseas, etc. For all of those marriages to make up less than 50% of total marriages sounds like a huge exaggeration.

I didn't ignore anything. I said that having standards helps you meet the person you want to be with and you have to search for someone who fits your standards instead of simply accepting some random person as your lover. Once again I'm getting mixed signals from you. I feel like this is something we agree on but you keep insisting that I'm wrong for some reason.

What did I misquote? Oh, and you're right about English being my first language.
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Posted 10/12/14

PhantomGundam wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:

Exactly.

I love the idea of being in a long, love-filled relationship because you WANT to; not because you're bound by a bunch of stupid papers and a fee of $50 000.



Sounds like you associate marriage with all of that paperwork instead of with that it's actually suppose to signify. Marriage is a step in your relationship that you take because it's a sign that you love this person enough to dedicate the rest of your life to them. The paperwork and money nonsense is just to make it easier for the courts and so the government has a more accurate census of people living together. It has more to do with government than with your actual relationship. In other words, marriage is living the rest of your life with someone who you actually want to be with. You don't have the long relationship because you're bound by papers (which is what your idea of marriage seems to be). You get the papers because you love your partner enough to show them you're willing to be with them forever. I hope this made sense.


Hayagriva wrote:


Let's retrace our steps.

The original post of the thread: I want to get married, but I don't want my family OR the internet to set me up.

My response: You shouldn't close doors like that. Not if you really want to be married. Or, learn to live with the consequences of closing doors.

Your response: You shouldn't tell the OP to just marry some random person. They should have standards.

My response: o.O We... weren't even talking about that. And I did not imply it in any shape or form.


I have been facepalming ever since.


And no, the internet is more random, because there is a greater volume of people with more randomized variables regardless of the search medium. While I personally think you would be attracted to the more important parts FIRST since physical attraction isn't initially part of the equation, and the internet facilitates this rather well, you will always be able to tell more about a person through a personal conversation than an internet chat.

Should you believe otherwise, that's just something you tell yourself to make you feel better about your choices. It's your own demon, which doesn't interest me at all.

Your age matters in the sense that when you're out of high school, and out of college, you are no longer having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. Statistically, most people marry someone they found through their job. Meeting people isn't nearly the same dynamic after, and it's not an experience you COULD have had yet. When you reach that stage in your life, you're a lot more appreciative of random connections.

You also conveniently ignored another point I had made - the inarguable fact that with ANY set of standards, the more people you pass through the screen, the more likely you will find people you want to keep in your life. If you disagree with that, that's fine, but don't make your social laziness another person's problem.

You misquoted several other things. Out of sheer curiosity: is English your first language? Because it's the only time I've had these weird off-kilter arguments.


Your first post has several parts. I already told you which part I was questioning you about and you ignored it. You've been facepalming at a guy whose been trying to clarify your mistakes. If you insist that you weren't implying what I thought you were implying, I'm sorry but you really should have made your posts a lot clearer. Every time you reply to me your posts get more jumbled up. It was hard to tell what your point is since you keep saying one thing and then disagreeing with it when I say it.

My age has absolutely nothing to do with what you just said. Even when you're out of college and have a job, you're still having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. It's not like you're going to have a new set of co-workers every week or everyone else in your neighborhood gets replaced when a new neighbor moves in. You're going to have random people thrown into your lives for long periods of time no matter what your age is. And where did you get such a statistic from? I highly doubt over 50% of marriages are between people who met at work. Marriages happen all the time between people who met in college, in high school (although this one is rare), in the neighborhood, overseas, etc. For all of those marriages to make up less than 50% of total marriages sounds like a huge exaggeration.

I didn't ignore anything. I said that having standards helps you meet the person you want to be with and you have to search for someone who fits your standards instead of simply accepting some random person as your lover. Once again I'm getting mixed signals from you. I feel like this is something we agree on but you keep insisting that I'm wrong for some reason.

What did I misquote? Oh, and you're right about English being my first language.



Eh. Over %80 of marriages dont last. REAL love is being with the person without the binding contracts.

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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 10/12/14

PhantomGundam wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:

Exactly.

I love the idea of being in a long, love-filled relationship because you WANT to; not because you're bound by a bunch of stupid papers and a fee of $50 000.



Sounds like you associate marriage with all of that paperwork instead of with that it's actually suppose to signify. Marriage is a step in your relationship that you take because it's a sign that you love this person enough to dedicate the rest of your life to them. The paperwork and money nonsense is just to make it easier for the courts and so the government has a more accurate census of people living together. It has more to do with government than with your actual relationship. In other words, marriage is living the rest of your life with someone who you actually want to be with. You don't have the long relationship because you're bound by papers (which is what your idea of marriage seems to be). You get the papers because you love your partner enough to show them you're willing to be with them forever. I hope this made sense.


Hayagriva wrote:


Let's retrace our steps.

The original post of the thread: I want to get married, but I don't want my family OR the internet to set me up.

My response: You shouldn't close doors like that. Not if you really want to be married. Or, learn to live with the consequences of closing doors.

Your response: You shouldn't tell the OP to just marry some random person. They should have standards.

My response: o.O We... weren't even talking about that. And I did not imply it in any shape or form.


I have been facepalming ever since.


And no, the internet is more random, because there is a greater volume of people with more randomized variables regardless of the search medium. While I personally think you would be attracted to the more important parts FIRST since physical attraction isn't initially part of the equation, and the internet facilitates this rather well, you will always be able to tell more about a person through a personal conversation than an internet chat.

Should you believe otherwise, that's just something you tell yourself to make you feel better about your choices. It's your own demon, which doesn't interest me at all.

Your age matters in the sense that when you're out of high school, and out of college, you are no longer having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. Statistically, most people marry someone they found through their job. Meeting people isn't nearly the same dynamic after, and it's not an experience you COULD have had yet. When you reach that stage in your life, you're a lot more appreciative of random connections.

You also conveniently ignored another point I had made - the inarguable fact that with ANY set of standards, the more people you pass through the screen, the more likely you will find people you want to keep in your life. If you disagree with that, that's fine, but don't make your social laziness another person's problem.

You misquoted several other things. Out of sheer curiosity: is English your first language? Because it's the only time I've had these weird off-kilter arguments.


Your first post has several parts. I already told you which part I was questioning you about and you ignored it. You've been facepalming at a guy whose been trying to clarify your mistakes. If you insist that you weren't implying what I thought you were implying, I'm sorry but you really should have made your posts a lot clearer. Every time you reply to me your posts get more jumbled up. It was hard to tell what your point is since you keep saying one thing and then disagreeing with it when I say it.

My age has absolutely nothing to do with what you just said. Even when you're out of college and have a job, you're still having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. It's not like you're going to have a new set of co-workers every week or everyone else in your neighborhood gets replaced when a new neighbor moves in. You're going to have random people thrown into your lives for long periods of time no matter what your age is. And where did you get such a statistic from? I highly doubt over 50% of marriages are between people who met at work. Marriages happen all the time between people who met in college, in high school (although this one is rare), in the neighborhood, overseas, etc. For all of those marriages to make up less than 50% of total marriages sounds like a huge exaggeration.

I didn't ignore anything. I said that having standards helps you meet the person you want to be with and you have to search for someone who fits your standards instead of simply accepting some random person as your lover. Once again I'm getting mixed signals from you. I feel like this is something we agree on but you keep insisting that I'm wrong for some reason.

What did I misquote? Oh, and you're right about English being my first language.


You're the one who keeps talking about standards. The original poster didn't, and I didn't either. It was nowhere in the conversation.

YOUR misinterpretation was where I said that I wouldn't mind finding the right girl, but also that I do not look for her, and I accept the consequences of that. I mentioned it because the original poster has clearly not made such a decision. He changed his mind later, so the whole conversation was moot. I also wouldn't mind winning the lottery, but I don't buy tickets every week. I do not therefore grumble about not winning the lottery. What part of that needs clarification? You would have to PURPOSEFULLY misunderstand that. Which you did.

YOU, however are the one who brought standards into the picture with your first post responding to mine. I wasn't talking about standards, and neither was he. If anything was confused after that, it was because you derailed the entire conversation by making it about something else. Probably about you.

Yes, you. Things started to become a little clearer after I looked at your profile. Thousands of posts. Sizable CR points. No buddies. I'm betting you're one of those who prides themselves on their "intelligence," and justifies their lack of intimate social interaction with "standards." All the pieces fit. Vehement defense of standards (which nobody was even talking about) and about meeting people online instead of in real life. I'm betting you go around trying to stuff yourself into conversations so you can display your preconceived notions. Or, possibly, you're just trolling me.


I think I'm getting mixed messages from you. On one hand you say people who want a relationship should go out and meet more people instead of limiting themselves to less people. But then when I say that people who want a relationship should search for the person they think is right for them, you spend the rest of your argument trying to say I'm wrong and that they shouldn't make an effort to meet someone they think would be an ideal partner for them. What exactly are you trying to say?


For the last time... If you're including MORE people, socially speaking, you are MORE likely to find someone you really hit it off with. I don't know WHY this is so hard for you. My only explanation is you're either trolling me, or trying to justify your own choices to someone else, which I don't give a damn about.
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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 10/12/14

DivinePrince wrote:


PhantomGundam wrote:


DivinePrince wrote:

Exactly.

I love the idea of being in a long, love-filled relationship because you WANT to; not because you're bound by a bunch of stupid papers and a fee of $50 000.



Sounds like you associate marriage with all of that paperwork instead of with that it's actually suppose to signify. Marriage is a step in your relationship that you take because it's a sign that you love this person enough to dedicate the rest of your life to them. The paperwork and money nonsense is just to make it easier for the courts and so the government has a more accurate census of people living together. It has more to do with government than with your actual relationship. In other words, marriage is living the rest of your life with someone who you actually want to be with. You don't have the long relationship because you're bound by papers (which is what your idea of marriage seems to be). You get the papers because you love your partner enough to show them you're willing to be with them forever. I hope this made sense.


Hayagriva wrote:


Let's retrace our steps.

The original post of the thread: I want to get married, but I don't want my family OR the internet to set me up.

My response: You shouldn't close doors like that. Not if you really want to be married. Or, learn to live with the consequences of closing doors.

Your response: You shouldn't tell the OP to just marry some random person. They should have standards.

My response: o.O We... weren't even talking about that. And I did not imply it in any shape or form.


I have been facepalming ever since.


And no, the internet is more random, because there is a greater volume of people with more randomized variables regardless of the search medium. While I personally think you would be attracted to the more important parts FIRST since physical attraction isn't initially part of the equation, and the internet facilitates this rather well, you will always be able to tell more about a person through a personal conversation than an internet chat.

Should you believe otherwise, that's just something you tell yourself to make you feel better about your choices. It's your own demon, which doesn't interest me at all.

Your age matters in the sense that when you're out of high school, and out of college, you are no longer having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. Statistically, most people marry someone they found through their job. Meeting people isn't nearly the same dynamic after, and it's not an experience you COULD have had yet. When you reach that stage in your life, you're a lot more appreciative of random connections.

You also conveniently ignored another point I had made - the inarguable fact that with ANY set of standards, the more people you pass through the screen, the more likely you will find people you want to keep in your life. If you disagree with that, that's fine, but don't make your social laziness another person's problem.

You misquoted several other things. Out of sheer curiosity: is English your first language? Because it's the only time I've had these weird off-kilter arguments.


Your first post has several parts. I already told you which part I was questioning you about and you ignored it. You've been facepalming at a guy whose been trying to clarify your mistakes. If you insist that you weren't implying what I thought you were implying, I'm sorry but you really should have made your posts a lot clearer. Every time you reply to me your posts get more jumbled up. It was hard to tell what your point is since you keep saying one thing and then disagreeing with it when I say it.

My age has absolutely nothing to do with what you just said. Even when you're out of college and have a job, you're still having random people thrown at you for extended periods of time. It's not like you're going to have a new set of co-workers every week or everyone else in your neighborhood gets replaced when a new neighbor moves in. You're going to have random people thrown into your lives for long periods of time no matter what your age is. And where did you get such a statistic from? I highly doubt over 50% of marriages are between people who met at work. Marriages happen all the time between people who met in college, in high school (although this one is rare), in the neighborhood, overseas, etc. For all of those marriages to make up less than 50% of total marriages sounds like a huge exaggeration.

I didn't ignore anything. I said that having standards helps you meet the person you want to be with and you have to search for someone who fits your standards instead of simply accepting some random person as your lover. Once again I'm getting mixed signals from you. I feel like this is something we agree on but you keep insisting that I'm wrong for some reason.

What did I misquote? Oh, and you're right about English being my first language.



Eh. Over %80 of marriages dont last. REAL love is being with the person without the binding contracts.



I actually mentioned what you said about real love in my first post. Devotion, no ceremony necessary.
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Posted 10/12/14

AiYumega wrote:
You can't just whip up a soulmate in an E-Z Bake Oven and marry them[...]


After a few months of cookie-shaped wives I should've known better...

I would be much better off with a wife, but I can't say the same for her; which is probably why I'm still single. (All jokes aside... there wouldn't be anything left of me!)

Posted 10/12/14
run...die

good enough of a recipe
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