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Post Reply Anime on Netflix
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Posted 10/29/17
Ok, but it seems more like a remake and not a second season. Kind of like what they did with two different versions of Full Metal Alchemist? Because the one on Netfix seems to start right from the beginning and introduce the characters again?
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Posted 10/30/17 , edited 10/30/17
So I just got a notice from Netflix telling me Fate/ Apocrypha hits Netflilx (all episodes Season 1) on November 7th

Now this is Canadian Netflix we're talking about and I'm curious if it's showing up on American Netflix or if it'll be staying Amazon/Prime only?

because if the Amazon Prime stuff will become Netflix for Canada, I'm ok with that.
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Posted 10/30/17

Greylurker wrote:

So I just got a notice from Netflix telling me Fate/ Apocrypha hits Netflilx (all episodes Season 1) on November 7th

Now this is Canadian Netflix we're talking about and I'm curious if it's showing up on American Netflix or if it'll be staying Amazon/Prime only?

because if the Amazon Prime stuff will become Netflix for Canada, I'm ok with that.


It showed up in my notifications for the same date, too. (US Netflix)
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Posted 10/30/17
so not just Canada then.

fine by me as well
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Posted 11/1/17
I reallt wish that Netflix didn't buy so much anime shows now that they aren;t on Crunchroll!
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Posted 11/1/17
Well, these animators need the money, and Netflix can offer way more than what Crunchyroll can.
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Posted 11/1/17

Bakaneer wrote:

Well, these animators need the money, and Netflix can offer way more than what Crunchyroll can.


How much of our subscription money does crunchyroll even provide to the animators over in Japan?
Because I know that crunchyroll has employees, events, and a lot of other things that needs to be paid.
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Posted 11/2/17

Bakaneer wrote:

Well, these animators need the money, and Netflix can offer way more than what Crunchyroll can.



Regent182 wrote:

How much of our subscription money does crunchyroll even provide to the animators over in Japan?
Because I know that crunchyroll has employees, events, and a lot of other things that needs to be paid.


A good article for you / Aaron is a good writer / There are Pros and Cons

NETFLIX under paying Studios / and more Bad NEWS



The Dual Edge of Netflix and the Ruthless Anime Industry /
ByAaron Magulick -October 29, 2017
goboiano

The anime industry is in a strange place right now. Revenue has never been higher – the industry is currently worth 2.0 trillion yen.

http://goboiano.com/the-anime-industry-earned-a-record-2-trillion-yen-in-2016/

Revenue is at record highs, but not everyone in the industry is benefiting.

Licensing from China and North America has reached record highs and has led to Japanese companies acknowledging the effects of international markets.

The current amount of hours being produced has skyrocketed, with any given season comprising 35 to 50 anime series at a time.

Netflix has stated that they are producing 30 original anime titles for 2018. Crunchyroll, Amazon, Funimation, and Apple Studios have also invested into anime series.

But the newfound money and international interest haven’t exactly translated into enthusiasm for animators, who are the lifeblood of the industry.

The bad working conditions and below-poverty wages have been reported by various outlets and individual animators have taken to Twitter to voice their frustrations about the industry they love. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Sola Digital Arts President Joseph Chou said, “Lately the media has been bashing the anime industry over working conditions; the TV stations have been reporting on it, but they’re a big culprit.”

The average animator works 11 hours a day, 6 days a week and earn 100,000 yen ($911) a month.

Chou is referring to how TV stations are being two-faced in their reporting. Late night anime have to buy airtime from TV stations, which doesn’t always come cheap. The contracts are also ruthless – if a studio is having production issues and need to delay an episode, like the final two episodes of Long Riders!, they have to pay for both the missed and new time slot.

TV networks, like NHK and Fuji TV, also have seats on production committees. They are fully aware of the working conditions and cut-throat deadlines because they help dictate the budgets.

The production committee system used by a vast majority of anime benefits all parties except for studios and animators. Outside of a few, like Kyoto Animation and Sunrise, many studios lose money after the airing of their work. They have to rely on home video and portions of merchandise sales to leave the red.

Chou credits Netflix for helping alleviate some of the stress, “Netflix is restoring it to a sane business model. You’re looking at maybe a 15 percent margin rather than a 5 percent loss.”

In fact, Chou told The Hollywood Reporter that streaming services like Amazon’s Anime Strike and Crunchyroll are, “scrambling to meet with everybody,” but Netflix has the advantage of being more aggressive.

Streaming services like Netflix, Crunchyroll, and Anime Strike may be heading towards an “original programming” arms race.

Regardless of who is making the deals, Kotaro Yoshikawa, VP of Distribution and Licensing at TMS Entertainment, believes streaming services dealing directly with studios is a much-needed shake-up for the industry. “There’s no TV station involved to say what needs to be done to make something okay for broadcast.”

The newfound creative freedom may be exciting, but not everyone is jumping for joy. Back in August, animators launched a hashtag to voice their displeasure with working on Netflix produced series. Many animators said that working conditions did not improve and their pay did not increase – dashing the hopes of fans who believed Netflix could change the harsh working conditions.

In fact, the orders for original content from Netflix and other streaming sites have put increased strain studios. A shortage of animators and increased negative press of working conditions have made young animators wary of entering the industry, to longer work hours for freelancers and increased production delays.

Chou said, “It’s not a bonanza or bubble yet, but nearly all the studios are fully booked until 2020.” There’s estimated to be 75 active, main animation studios.

http://goboiano.com/the-dual-edge-of-netflix-and-the-ruthless-anime-industry/
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Posted 11/3/17

FLjerry2011 wrote:

NETFLIX under paying Studios / and more Bad NEWS

Your headline appears to conflict with the article:

Chou credits Netflix for helping alleviate some of the stress, “Netflix is restoring it to a sane business model. You’re looking at maybe a 15 percent margin rather than a 5 percent loss.”

The complaint voiced later in the article is this:

The newfound creative freedom may be exciting, but not everyone is jumping for joy. Back in August, animators launched a hashtag to voice their displeasure with working on Netflix produced series. Many animators said that working conditions did not improve and their pay did not increase – dashing the hopes of fans who believed Netflix could change the harsh working conditions.

So Netflix isn't underpaying the studios, but it appears those studios are still underpaying the animators.

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Posted 11/3/17 , edited 11/5/17
(quote got messed up, but quoted the above)

The producer of the anime (Netflix or Production Committee) has a budget for the anime:

That budget has to be divided between a lot of different places: Multiple animation studios, music producers, voice actors (and directors, recording engineers, etc.), graphic designers, marketing teams, etc., and remember that all of these people have to pay for their equipment, offices, etc., and they pay for airtime. They don't get paid to air the show on TV, they pay to have it aired.

The studios basically bid to lower their prices to get more work. Once the studio gets paid, they have to pay for:
- Subcontracting to other studios (for things like in-betweening - a lot of this goes outside of Japan, to cheaper countries).
- Their own equipment and studio space
- Bookkeeping, managerial things aside from the actual animation work
- And pay the actual animators - out of which there are a lot of different roles.

The issue is also that the anime studios don't want to keep within their budget if it means not doing the best work possible. They'd rather go over budget than deliver a bad product - because all the fans "fighting for their rights" are the same people who would be flaming them and mocking them like crazy if they actually stopped working after they finish the amount they've been paid for.

So yeah, more money into anime is the solution, but it doesn't happen overnight. People need to get used to having more money, and then they'll start allocating it differently. Because remember, this business moves so fast these people don't even have time to think about rebalancing their budgets when they have a ton of deadlines.

They also probably owe a lot on rent, equipment, etc., that has to be paid with any increase they get before they can move that into higher pay for artists.

Animator work-hours aren't the only input into anime. It's really, really important to remember that this is some of the most complex work on the planet, and it requires so many different hands and specialties and skills.
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Posted one day ago
Okay so I'm watch Miss Hokusai. It's supposed to be great. No dub? That's fine. What fucking gets me though is the ONLY subtitle option is English for the hearing impaired. What the fuck Netflix?
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Posted one day ago
NETFLIX GOOD ( A Few) AND BAD ( TOO MANY OVERSIGHTS)


ITS TOO BAD FOR THE MOST PART NETFLIX are doing their animes a Disrespect / dont understand Anime Fans

It basically started with Knights of Sidonia / AJIN

I enjoyed both despite being a season behind The other rant I was more accepting of the CGI IN KOS Than AJIN

Two more recent anime that were good Seven Deadly Sins and Violet Evergarden despite a seson behind

I also read Devil Crybaby was good

RANTS

#1 Of course the season long delays for some anime / it loses its impact and DVD / Merch sales

#2 The Lack of Infro on The NETFLIX SHOW pages at least Amazon Prime will put up the infro when the EP airs

# 3 The rush to binge drop B Project / A.I.C.O. with a new dubbing studio with VA's that dont know anime Thanks Netflix for garbarge

# 4 Still the animation studios are contracted ( A few exceptions ) and get a fixed fee not helping the studios / animators

So despite all the great expections there is lot of problems going on

Hdive does a great job . I wish all of the rest of anime that CR dont license or get goes to them insteado of Nerflix / Amazon
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Posted 16 hours ago
And the library of older series keeps expanding. Goodbye, free time.
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Posted 14 hours ago

MysticGon wrote:
Okay so I'm watch Miss Hokusai. It's supposed to be great. No dub? That's fine. What fucking gets me though is the ONLY subtitle option is English for the hearing impaired. What the fuck Netflix?


Man, you're right. I've never seen that happen with an anime on Netflix before. That is rather odd. Wonder if its some problem with Universal and licensing? Or if they just cocked up the subtitle files. I somehow doubt Netflix does its own subtitles for shows it doesn't produce so I would assume they get the subtitle tracks from the original distributor.



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