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Moral Implications of Profiling
Posted 10/29/14
What would you think of someone who kept a database of everyone he/she met? Imagine a spreadsheet with a page for each individual, which lists their personality traits, recent hobbies, life goals, taste in food and clothing, and anything else you can think of that could be useful for the next time you bump into them. Preferably with a photo as well, because it's easy to forget names.

I'm aware that profiling isn't so uncommon in the professional world. Nobody remembers everything about everyone they meet. Doctors keep records of their patients, and enterprises keep databases of searchable profiles for their employees. A former hostess that I know had carried on a habit from her old job to take down notes about the people she speaks to as though they were customers (where she'd pretend to go to the bathroom to take notes), and while my other friends found it creepy, I found it fascinating. Because without it, conversations would go in loops with no hint of progression. Nothing is more awkward than bumping into someone you've forgotten, and pretending that you remember them after missing the chance to ask. If it weren't for social networking services like Facebook, I wouldn't be able to remember the faces of half the people I know now.

A while back I had dinner with a branch manager of a bank. He was an old man into bike riding. I managed to get the man to like me by speaking about my exaggerated passion for bike riding as well, and he offered to give me his spare bike. I admit, I really wanted that damn bike. He gave me his business card and told me to absolutely give him a call to meet again sometime. I never called back. Why? Because I didn't want to call him for the sake of receiving his bike, when I'd completely forgotten his face as well as the details of the conversations we had at the time (all I remembered was that he likes riding bikes). While scratching my head about how I should approach it, months had gone by and it was clearly too late to give him a call to receive that bike. Besides losing a potential bike, I also lost a professional connection that could have been of use in the future. Clearly I would have been better off if I inputted his interests and his likely opinion of myself (meaning what personality type I presented myself as at the time) into a spreadsheet the night I met him.

I'm considering picking it up as a productive hobby sometime, but wondering whether it's something that I would need to hide at all costs. I believe this as a hobby would be of great value when entering the workforce. The question is, what would you think of someone who remembered you off a database? Do you think there's an intrinsic value in remembering people off by heart?
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It doesn't matter.
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Posted 10/29/14
Facebook already does that for most people.
Posted 10/29/14

Sir_jamesalot wrote:

Facebook already does that for most people.


Not everyone has Facebook.
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Posted 10/29/14

applestash wrote:


Sir_jamesalot wrote:

Facebook already does that for most people.


Not everyone has Facebook.


Most do or did and the information stored there can never be deleted.
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Posted 10/29/14

Most do or did and the information stored there can never be deleted.

It'll be like apart of you will live on forever on facebook.
Posted 10/29/14
I don't mind if people write down my fav hobbies, anime etc. but would find it creepy if they profile everything... like what time I get out of bed... leave the house etc. Who i'm seeing etc... (I like to use etc when I couldn't think of anything else to say )

______

As for myself, I find that i'm good at remembering useless info about other people. like I can remember convos from like one year ago... I have a pretty good memory when it comes to useless things. (I'm not calling the people I talk to useless, i'm just saying remembering convos is a pretty useless talent).

I wish my memory is good when it comes to important things like academic stuff
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Posted 10/29/14
I would feel somewhat disturbed, but honestly I'd also feel flattered at the same time. If they went to that much effort for something like that, it'd be impressive at best. But that's all, really.
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Posted 10/29/14 , edited 10/29/14

Shnooze wrote:

I would feel somewhat disturbed, but honestly I'd also feel flattered at the same time. If they went to that much effort for something like that, it'd be impressive at best. But that's all, really.


This.

Although, I'd go a bit deeper and wonder why they would go to such lengths.
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19 / M / Purgatory
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Posted 10/29/14
I almost never forget faces, names or conversation. I'm pretty good with remembering most details. So long as it's more than meaningless chit-chat. Keeping literal notes of the people I meet and talk to wouldn't really be of any use to me.

But I would be fine with someone keeping notes of me. Somewhat flattered actually...
It might be a little creepy if it were really extensive, but I'm mostly fine with the idea.
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18 / M / Across the Narrow...
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Posted 10/29/14
I would not care if they did, if they felt it was necessary to spend their quality time writing about someone they might ot encounter later in their life it is their choice. Either way, if I forget them (which I usually do) it would be awkward having a conversation.
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23 / M / Bolton, England
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Posted 10/29/14
That would be weird
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Posted 10/29/14 , edited 10/29/14


That depends on what you're keeping track of.
Basic information and interests can be necessary for business associates and colleagues.

Tracking how many times they go to the washroom, or wear a certain pair of socks, is not.

I would keep this information on a flash drive or hidden folder on your computer. Some people may take it the wrong way.
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20 / M
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Posted 10/29/14 , edited 10/29/14
There's a word for people obsessed with this. They're called stalkers.
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26 / M / Houma
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Posted 10/29/14 , edited 10/29/14
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/189259-real-time-emotion-detection-with-google-glass-an-awesome-creepy-taste-of-the-future-of-wearable-computers

that + facial recognition + graphene batteries + any online accessible database or potentially even facebook...

This is the future we are heading towards. Prepare to potentially be exploited almost like a game... better start working on your facade.

I don't find it all bad though, I think it would go far toward making people more genuinely honest, and if you really are terrible at picking up on small cues in facial expressions such a thing would greatly help. I'm not sure if I'm included in that group or not... I'm starting to suspect I am....
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M / Lagrangian Librat...
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Posted 10/29/14
Farley file concept has been around for centuries. I first came across the concept in reading Heinlein's novel Double Star.
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