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Post Reply Life After High School
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19 / M / Cali
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Posted 10/30/14 , edited 10/30/14
Often times in America, kids in school are told to avoid going to community college. I'm about to apply to some schools and graduate and before I do anything, I just need to know what's so bad about community college? What do adults even do after graduating?

My grades are nowhere near university requirements?? I don't even know what I'm good at for a career?? Am I gonna survive?? Am I ever gonna get married and have kids??!?



But yeah. What have you guys done after graduating (or dropping out lol) high school? The good and the bad details??
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33 / M / Baltimore, MD
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Posted 10/30/14
I graduated high school a long while ago. Immediately after I got married, I went to college. I'm an engineer, got a BS & MS in chemical engineering and currently work as an environmental engineer. I'm also currently married with 4 kids. So, there's that.

There's nothing wrong with community college. For what I wanted to do, it may not have worked out. For others? It would. There are great trade school programs out there for people who aren't fit for a 4 year university/college. My 20 year old sister is currently in a few month program to become an medical assistant. There are lots of programs out there. For Americans, Mike Rowe has set up a scholarship program for those going to trade schools: http://profoundlydisconnected.com/the-mikeroweworks-foundation-scholarship-opportunities/
Posted 10/30/14 , edited 11/16/14
Study harder or prepare to have your backdoor become your money entry.
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22 / M / Greed Island
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Posted 10/30/14
It's just that I guess you missed out on the dorm and supposedly 'college' life defined here with as much independence from parents as possible. You also build a great amount of "networking" lol if you are part of some sort of fraternity or w/e. Financially speaking though, community colleges are great since you can grind a lot of prerequisites and get your associates with high grades. I also enjoyed community college for the sake of that I had all the time to focus on working out, etc.

Pros: Cost efficient
Stay comfy at home
Absolutely great if you're into fitness since you can cook for yourself
Just grind the bullcrap prerequisites with high grades
Classes are smaller
Gives you time to think about your career since your mind can always change

Cons: Less build-up of friend "network" - Helps later on if you wanna get hook ups on a job or something lol.
Less partying
Can't get the crazy basketball or football games live
Some universities have some programs that can only be granted if you signed up with them straight out of high school.
Less clubs or fraternities
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27 / M / WI
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Posted 10/30/14
Research and be goal oriented. I graduated from a 4 year college. However, many of my class are struggling because they majored in biology, psychology or philosophy. I graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Materials Science. Jobs are relatively plentiful and pay very well.

Do some research and soul searching and make a realistic list of your aptitudes. Take entry level courses at a 2 or 4 year school to test your hypothesis. From there, do research into what jobs are or will be in demand when you plan to enter the work force. Be very careful of your sources in the regard and realize academia exists as a business to take your money. They get paid regardless of whether you get a job when you leave school, never forget that.

Once you have a career in mind, do more research and specialize or generalize to fit common job descriptions. Ex. In my field MSCI is a comprehensive major. To set myself apart from others, I took additional coursework in the college of business to make my qualifications more versatile. This is an example of generalizing. However, one of my friend's and fellow MSCIs took very specific course work and did research in nano science with me into Graphene Scrolls. This is an example of specializing. Since I did both, I can basically make recruiters think I fit their job postings better, study their specific industry and then improvise when I get to the interview.

Education in a filed that has job prospects is the key to a bright future in almost all circumstances. Proceed with this in mind and remember that you can always get more schooling later if you need it. However, I have heard getting aditional degrees is harder later in life.

If I can give you one simple piece of advice: Plan Ahead, Always. Always try to look 5 moves ahead. Always think before you speak and always prepare for the worst. Good luck.
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27 / M
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Posted 10/30/14 , edited 2/16/15
Go to more school then work and pay bills... Then you do stuff to take away the pain like drink or smoke...
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27 / M / WI
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Posted 10/30/14
Oh and apply for scholarships early and often. The first few are a bitch. But, you will soon realize they all ask basically the same questions so you can copy and paste mostly if you make a master document with Red blanks to fill in details. Also remember that scholarships can be need or merit based.
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20 / F / You don't need to...
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Posted 10/30/14 , edited 10/30/14
Right now I'm a freshman at a university. A lot of my friends have gone to community college, but some to universities as well. Basically, community college is the same as high school, only teachers teach less and use more resources and you have less social time. And you don't live on a campus. I actually could have had 2 free years of community college, but I decided to transfer my credits and go to a university instead because I wanted a big change and to meet new people. Plus it's kind of nice to live on your own lol But whatever you want, do it. Just if you're a person who usually does harder classes, I would recommend going to a university more.
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20 / M / Chaika's Eyebrows
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Posted 10/30/14 , edited 10/30/14

narutosonic330 wrote:

what's so bad about community college?


Typically the workload isn't that intense as it would be at a university. I don't see why anyone would consider it bad, though. I had the grades to make it into a university, but I saw my student loans and decided to take two years at a community college. It really is the more cost effective plan to go two years at a community college then transfer to a 4-year if you want. Some CCCs are better than others, but most have guaranteed transfer programs with UCs and CSUs. If they were such a terrible place, then the 4-year colleges wouldn't take transfers from them. So just move at your own pace.
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47 / M / Memphis, TN
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Posted 10/30/14 , edited 10/30/14
I received a full scholarship to the university of my choice; missed classes for days at a time drunk; lost my scholarship and got kicked out. Thank the Goddess for community college! It was my second chance, and I used it--then successfully tackled university.
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23 / M / New Jersey
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Posted 10/30/14
It sucks after highschool just more school work in college and i have to pay for it this time yippee.
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40 / M / End of Nowhere
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Posted 10/30/14

narutosonic330 wrote:

Often times in America, kids in school are told to avoid going to community college. I'm about to apply to some schools and graduate and before I do anything, I just need to know what's so bad about community college? What do adults even do after graduating?

My grades are nowhere near university requirements?? I don't even know what I'm good at for a career?? Am I gonna survive?? Am I ever gonna get married and have kids??!?


Adults go out and get a job and make a living. Adults do not let their failings get in the way of success. Adults accept failure when it happens, learn from it, and move on. Adults do not sit around complaining or blaming others for their own short comings or failures. A college degree or lack of it neither makes one an adult nor disqualifies one from being an adult.

Who is telling you to avoid community college? Your parents? Your friends? The media? Your school adviser? That a good middle class life requires college is rather old data really. I think it is one more of pride. Either families want someone from their family to somehow get a college degree regardless of whether or not it prepares them for the future or regardless of the price. Or else the parents have a college education and do not want to see their children be less educated than they even if it is not a right fit for the young adult or even them. College does not confer, inherently a job nor job qualifications.

There is nothing wrong with community college, in many cases it provides a stepping stone to a 4 year college with a fraction of the expense. Other times it allows for entrance to a trade. Do you have any idea how much a 21 year old Mechanic makes versus a 21 year old college graduate on average? Especially considering the mechanic probably does not have much in the way of personal debt? Or how much a plumber or electrical apprentice makes? Or will make once they get their masters certificate and qualifications?

Ever considered the Merchant Marine? Know how much the officers on an Ocean Liner makes, much less the Captain? Or that of an oil tanker or cargo ship? Talk about never facing unemployment, those are growth opportunities. Or an airplane mechanic? All of which you can get your start in with a community college.

Granted to be the officer of a ship or even Captain, you likely will need a college degree at some point. But by that time your employer may pay for it or you may be able to substitute work experience even. It all depends on the field and the requirements. But college is not going anywhere, they will still be there 100 years from now. There is no hurry.
Posted 10/30/14 , edited 11/16/14
After high school.... Well, I had no idea what I wanted to do so I decided to take a year or two off to try and figure things out. There was nothing at all that interested me and I was pretty much depressed constantly. I ended up just getting a job delivering newspapers until I could come to a decision but then after awhile I got really sick and hospitalized. Ended up losing the route I had and was diagnosed with a disease. I then was unsure if I would even be able to pull off a normal school life or job and went deeper into depression. Finally started getting things together enough to get a new newspaper route and have just been stuck ever since. Due to many events after this point though I still get majorly depressed and I still feel as though I would be no good at any kind of job. I seem to have no real skills that would point me at any kind of career. I can fix up computers but I use mostly illegal methods that would not work out too well in a normal setting and not only that but my knowledge even in that is fairly limited. These days I just drift through life sleeping and working and feeling rather miserable about how it all turned out. Some days I tell myself I will try and find something but that is quickly destroyed by another round of depression and feeling complete and utter hopelessness. I haven't even been able to force myself to drive yet. Though I am starting to feel more justified the more car accidents I am in. Just had yet another one about 2 nights ago. Probably shared too much but right now I really don't care.

Anyway...Fun times all around. My advice would be to push forward with any kind of schooling in any kind of subject you find even the least bit interesting and hope to god you find something that suits some kind of skill or talent you have.
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22 / M / Greed Island
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Posted 10/30/14
To be honest, unless you're really into heavy workload in school, the first two years are geared towards just a lot of basic stuff. Even then, a lot of what you learned in classes for an undergraduate program will just be tossed aside when you get into your graduate program then into an actual job. I just think of community college as a stepping stone. I mean I got two friends that go to Rutgers pharmacy school and one friend that goes to University of Florida, both whom I contacted with to see how the lessons differ from community college, but it's just basically a lot of the same information presented in much faster pace. If you're the type that likes teaching yourself by using many resources like myself, community college is for you since it offers you low -cost and you're already learning the same stuff that people who go to university does if you use the right resources.
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26 / F / MO
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Posted 10/30/14
I only applied to one university since it was the only one I had in my mind of attending. Thankfully I was able to get into the school haha. I don't think there is anything wrong with going to a community college .-. I personally think its just a choice that each person has to make, case-by-case scenarios. I personally do not regret my decision what-so-ever, and I was not part of a sorority haha as a matter of a fact after graduating I realized that I should have maybe stayed for an extra year since I didn't want the experience to end x]
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