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Journalist says cosplay is a bad sign for the U.S. Economy
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Posted 11/1/14

DollyDagger11 wrote:

This guy has no knowledge of the Japanese economy to begin with. If you're going to get paid to make a bias article, at least get some information to back up your ridiculous statements. These guys are just angry and frustrated that any money being made is being spent or promoting businesses outside of their country. Let them continue being butthurt and bashing other nations, at the end of the day they are using their technology to flush their own crap in.

They choose to promote an article to bash a harmless hobby. Okay, great. So, what point is he trying to make? Are drugs, alcohol, and tobacco use not an effect of a bad economy either? Or is that all just not worth mentioning, since it brings in the big bucks? Or maybe, just maybe, they are pissed off because those precious sales have declined in the past 10-15 years, so they turn their heads toward the entertainment industries? Must be nice to get paid for a load of bullshit.


He's not bashing the hobby if you read carefully. His idea came from the Japanese professor of sociology Masahiro in the first place as well as from the economists mentioned in the article within his article.

His weak point however is that he merely has a hunch that the US runs parallel to Japan in how no jobs causes increased cosplay. If he had gone further and said US shut-ins mostly do it because they cave in from societal standards like in Japan, I would be like "nope!"
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14
Didn't read the article, but he targets cosplayers...not too many people in the U.S. do cosplay. However, it is true that a lot of young Americans do indulge in escapism. That I think is generally good. I do it a lot and it can be great. However, I do think that, in general, too many young Americans put too much focus on escapism and not enough focus on working hard and having good work ethic.

I mean, cosplaying? Leave that one alone. Like I said, not too many people in America cosplay. But video games? How about that one? A lot of young Americans spend excessive amounts of time playing video games. I like video games. But honestly? I've found that playing excessive amounts of video games is mostly a waste of time. I think that a lot of Americans should play less video games, whether they be students in public schools or higher education or people who work a job. I think they should play less video games (or if it is something else; like watch less anime or movies if they do those a lot) if the large amount of time spent on those things results in them doing worse as students/not achieving as much at their job.

If people play video games, watch anime, etc., and they have things under control and are doing very good as a student or have good work ethic, are responsible, and are good at their job and their employers are happy with them, they can play video games and watch anime/movies/TV shows, etc., just fine. But usually, things aren't going over so well with responsibilities when people spend excessive amounts of time entertaining themselves and taking part in escapism.
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Posted 11/1/14
I don't mean to sound stupid, but doesn't the amount of Japanese people that cosplay equal the amount of Americans that cosplay? From what I remember, Japan is not always about anime and manga. I'm sure there are Japanese people that think anime is for "losers" too. Just wanna clarify that for biased-weaboos trollolol. Aside from that, cosplaying is no more than a hobby. Those who criticize it clearly don't have much perspective of life lol
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Posted 11/1/14

RedExodus wrote:



He's not bashing the hobby if you read carefully. His idea came from the Japanese professor of sociology Masahiro in the first place as well as from the economists mentioned in the article within his article.

His weak point however is that he merely has a hunch that the US runs parallel to Japan in how no jobs causes increased cosplay. If he had gone further and said US shut-ins mostly do it because they cave in from societal standards like in Japan, I would be like "nope!"


If his idea to write this solely came from the Japanese professor, he would have made points and further quotes of his opinion on the matter. But no, there was just 1 tiny statement quoted from him.

Title "Why the rise of cosplay is a bad sign for the U.S. economy".

He starts out by stating: Masahiro Yamada, a sociology professor at Chuo University in Tokyo, recently told the Financial Times. "Here, even the young and poor can feel as though they are a hero."

But then he follows up that quote and says: "After all, it's not that these young adults in Japan are resisting becoming productive members of the economy — it's that there just aren't enough opportunities for them. So an increasingly large number of them spend an increasingly large amount of time living in make-believe fantasy worlds, pretending they are someone else, somewhere else."

"When you're disillusioned with the reality of your early adult life, dressing up like Doctor Who starts looking better and better. It's not to say that all or even most cosplay aficionados are struggling to find work. It's only to say that any rise in people fleeing reality for fantasy suggests problems with our reality."

Then he thinks it's a great idea to go ahead and compare the US and Japanese economy hand in hand, emphasizing how younger generations don't have great job opportunities, yet somehow have money to spend on cosplay gatherings.

This is purely pointless and degrading in an utmost bias level, if you ask me. If someone, somewhere wants to post an article about a bad economy being linked to certain hobbies, they should speak of the harmful hobbies that can affect both economy and environment on a much bigger level.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/2/14

DollyDagger11 wrote:


RedExodus wrote:



He's not bashing the hobby if you read carefully. His idea came from the Japanese professor of sociology Masahiro in the first place as well as from the economists mentioned in the article within his article.

His weak point however is that he merely has a hunch that the US runs parallel to Japan in how no jobs causes increased cosplay. If he had gone further and said US shut-ins mostly do it because they cave in from societal standards like in Japan, I would be like "nope!"


If his idea to write this solely came from the Japanese professor, he would have made points and further quotes of his opinion on the matter. But no, there was just 1 tiny statement quoted from him.

Title "Why the rise of cosplay is a bad sign for the U.S. economy".

He starts out by stating: Masahiro Yamada, a sociology professor at Chuo University in Tokyo, recently told the Financial Times. "Here, even the young and poor can feel as though they are a hero."

But then he follows up that quote and says: "After all, it's not that these young adults in Japan are resisting becoming productive members of the economy — it's that there just aren't enough opportunities for them. So an increasingly large number of them spend an increasingly large amount of time living in make-believe fantasy worlds, pretending they are someone else, somewhere else."

"When you're disillusioned with the reality of your early adult life, dressing up like Doctor Who starts looking better and better. It's not to say that all or even most cosplay aficionados are struggling to find work. It's only to say that any rise in people fleeing reality for fantasy suggests problems with our reality."

Then he thinks it's a great idea to go ahead and compare the US and Japanese economy hand in hand, emphasizing how younger generations don't have great job opportunities, yet somehow have money to spend on cosplay gatherings.

This is purely pointless and degrading in an utmost bias level, if you ask me. If someone, somewhere wants to post an article about a bad economy being linked to certain hobbies, they should speak of the harmful hobbies that can affect both economy and environment on a much bigger level.

Yes, I saw the lines you highlighted in red. It seems to me that those were the parts that people took more negatively than they should have.

He clearly mentioned that the cosplayers are not to be blamed. I do not see where he says the problems of that reality comes from cosplaying itself but rather from economic troubles that the individuals had no control over. Would he contradict himself by meaning badly by those words as clumsily worded as they are? At least he offered a source material and I found:
High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email [email protected] to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/ec422956-3f22-11e4-a861-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz3Hs4n74uk

As you can see, it caught me trying to quote something from the article which may be why he left most of the details to the link.

If you wanna know what's biased, it's most of this thread. A couple misreads and most of us got all butthurt and are bashing the article singlemindedly with little discussion of where the idea came from and what the man is actually trying to imply. People write about all sorts of things anyways so I don't see why he shouldn't have written that article assuming that he didn't mean anything against the cosplayers. Nowhere do I see any sociological discussion about what's going on in Japan and how might it relate to the US. Forced conjectures everywhere too.

We're not doing much better on the bias scale in that case. Just saying.
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Posted 11/1/14


I can see.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14
Wow, so this guy is blaming a certain group of people for affecting the economy. Everybody gets blamed on damaging the economy nowadays.
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Posted 11/1/14

That's exactly what it said:
"It's not to say that all or even most cosplay aficionados are struggling to find work. It's only to say that any rise in people fleeing reality for fantasy suggests problems with our reality."

I do not think he was meaning to hit on cosplayers with his choice of words.


He may not have meant to hit on cosplayers with his choice of words, but how he approaches his article and relates a bad economy to a rise in cosplayers is doing just that. And since when did it become a bad thing to dress up as a favorite character of yours and have some fun to escape reality and have a break from your life and work? People have not only done this with cosplaying, but with other things like music, concerts and dances/get-togethers throughout history when things have been bad in reality such as wars and things like that. Heck, the American USO brings over actors, singers, comedians and other entertainers over to our troops in war zones to give them a break from everything that they're having to deal with. How is more cosplaying people wanting to take a break from reality for a bit when the World is in more turmoil than it's been in a long time a bad thing?
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Posted 11/1/14
reporters are not economists. most of the time they are talking out their ass. he can talk all the bull shit he wants to to sell his book but cossplay has no significant impact on the us economy beyond what thjey spend at the craft stores lol
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Posted 11/1/14

RedExodus wrote:

He clearly mentioned that the cosplayers are not to be blamed. I do not see where he says the problems of that reality comes from cosplaying itself but rather from economic troubles that the individuals had no control over. Would he contradict himself by meaning badly by those words as clumsily worded as they are? At least he offered a source material and I found:
High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email [email protected] to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/ec422956-3f22-11e4-a861-00144feabdc0.html#ixzz3Hs4n74uk

As you can see, it caught me trying to quote something from the article which may be why he left most of the details to the link.

If you wanna know what's biased, it's most of this thread. A couple misreads and most of us got all butthurt and are bashing the article singlemindedly with little discussion of where the idea came from and what the man is actually trying to imply. People write about all sorts of things anyways so I don't see why he shouldn't have written that article assuming that he didn't mean anything against the cosplayers. Nowhere do I see any sociological discussion about what's going on in Japan and how might it relate to the US. Forced conjectures everywhere too.

We're not doing much better on the bias scale in that case. Just saying.


Then you can argue that every single person's perspective on things are bias. That's not what I'm trying to point out here. The message I was trying to get across and the reason I was using the word bias was because the writer clearly stated himself that he considers the hobby as a way of fleeing reality into a little fantasy world and that it's a problem in our reality. What exactly is the issue here? Is it the bad economy and low inventory of jobs that's the problem, or the very hobby he's speaking of? The writer doesn't clarify what the actual issue is, and if you think he didn't "mean" to imply that the cosplaying hobby was an issue, he wouldn't have put the two together into the same sentence. Word for word, the writer defines the hobby as a way of fleeing reality, and being disillusioned in your early adult years. Do groups of people really have to be labelled as disillusioned individuals wanting to flee reality just for reading comic books or playing video games in their spare time? Those very statements are completely opinionated and vague, hence why I used the term bias. There is nothing factual about his statements concerning the hobby itself, other than being on the rise during bad economic times. How he defines the hobby itself is where the ridicule comes from. If his motive was to simply portray the fact that certain hobbies are a result of a bad economy, the words he used to describe them weren't the best of choice. Actually, stating his opinion on how he thinks it should be defined was not necessary in the first place.

There are no misreads going on here, people interpret words differently and have different views. The lines are quoted and are there to discuss. There are other statements I would like to clarify but I'll leave it at that since I'm going to go ahead and assume that you get where my opinion (and many others) on this is coming from.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14

BlackRose0607 wrote:


That's exactly what it said:
"It's not to say that all or even most cosplay aficionados are struggling to find work. It's only to say that any rise in people fleeing reality for fantasy suggests problems with our reality."

I do not think he was meaning to hit on cosplayers with his choice of words.


He may not have meant to hit on cosplayers with his choice of words, but how he approaches his article and relates a bad economy to a rise in cosplayers is doing just that. And since when did it become a bad thing to dress up as a favorite character of yours and have some fun to escape reality and have a break from your life and work? People have not only done this with cosplaying, but with other things like music, concerts and dances/get-togethers throughout history when things have been bad in reality such as wars and things like that. Heck, the American USO brings over actors, singers, comedians and other entertainers over to our troops in war zones to give them a break from everything that they're having to deal with. How is more cosplaying people wanting to take a break from reality for a bit when the World is in more turmoil than it's been in a long time a bad thing?


By "suggests problems with our reality" he was not referring to cosplay or our escapism but the economy. He's not trying to say cosplaying is bad but rather, the economy is bad. An abnormal increase in cosplay is just the detection method.

If I diagnose someone with depression 'cuz he/she plays video games a lot and I say that it's a bad sign, am I saying that video games are bad? No. A psychologist explained to me that people with depression may play a lot more video games but that doesn't mean video games are the bad influence.

DollyDagger11 wrote:


Then you can argue that every single person's perspective on things are bias. That's not what I'm trying to point out here. The message I was trying to get across and the reason I was using the word bias was because the writer clearly stated himself that he considers the hobby as a way of fleeing reality into a little fantasy world and that it's a problem in our reality. What exactly is the issue here? Is it the bad economy and low inventory of jobs that's the problem, or the very hobby he's speaking of? The writer doesn't clarify what the actual issue is, and if you think he didn't "mean" to imply that the cosplaying hobby was an issue, he wouldn't have put the two together into the same sentence. Word for word, the writer defines the hobby as a way of fleeing reality, and being disillusioned in your early adult years. Do groups of people really have to be labelled as disillusioned individuals wanting to flee reality just for reading comic books or playing video games in their spare time? Those very statements are completely opinionated and vague, hence why I used the term bias. There is nothing factual about his statements concerning the hobby itself, other than being on the rise during bad economic times. How he defines the hobby itself is where the ridicule comes from. If his motive was to simply portray the fact that certain hobbies are a result of a bad economy, the words he used to describe them weren't the best of choice. Actually, stating his opinion on how he thinks it should be defined was not necessary in the first place.

There are no misreads going on here, people interpret words differently and have different views. The lines are quoted and are there to discuss. There are other statements I would like to clarify but I'll leave it at that since I'm going to go ahead and assume that you get where my opinion (and many others) on this is coming from.


It's not as though I didn't take offense at the opening statement like most of everybody else before reading his article and reconsidering. Seriously though, what's the sense in ridiculing someone if you don't even understand what he really means? Ain't nobody around who asked: "What's he really saying?". Everybody just jumped the gun and were like "Oh, I'm calling it! Let's get him!" Interpreting the statements differently at first is not an excuse to not rethink it.
http://www.spring.org.uk/2009/09/why-you-cant-help-believing-everything-you-read.php
Most of the judgments were very hasty if anything. I see very little variance in how the message was received and I shouldn't have been the first person to bring this up.

This is like if a dude walked into a girl's shower by accident and she smacks him upside the head without knowing that; your typical anime accident.

My very first line in this thread was the unsure "I don't think he means..." and by far, very few have held back.

" If his motive was to simply portray the fact that certain hobbies are a result of a bad economy, the words he used to describe them weren't the best of choice."
I know that. I brought it up in the first place.

"Actually, stating his opinion on how he thinks it should be defined was not necessary in the first place."
Now I'm a know-not on what reporters are supposed to do but Sociology professors say that attempting to compare similarities in societal issues such as Hikikimori x Anorexia is what good sociologists do to further understand them.

If you mean the Japanese version of this issue which I doubt, take it up with the Japanese Sociology professor.
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Posted 11/2/14
I personally don't understand equating a rise in cosplay with a bad economy. Most cosplay that I've witnessed is at events, and even small events cost money. And most events which I've attended are in some way geared towards or at least equipped to make money. So, in my mind at least, I associate cosplay with money being spent, usually by both hosts and attendees. Could an increase in cosplay actually be indicative of a [slowly!] recovering economy, or at least consumer hope thereof?
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Posted 11/2/14

HuastecoOtaku wrote:

I think the guy who wrote this needs to stop judging a group of people he doesn't understand.

What do you think?


When you're disillusioned with the reality of your early adult life, dressing up like Doctor Who starts looking better and better. It's not to say that all or even most cosplay aficionados are struggling to find work. It's only to say that any rise in people fleeing reality for fantasy suggests problems with our reality.


http://theweek.com/article/index/269570/why-the-rise-of-cosplay-is-a-bad-sign-for-the-us-economy


Typical lolbertarian.
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Posted 11/2/14
I actually read this a few weeks ago. The author clearly has no idea what he's talking about. I was going to post this on my facebook to show all my friends but I decided that I did not want to give that article/website any hits or additional internet traffic.
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Posted 11/2/14
Lol, as someone who cosplays as The Doctor, another person quoting it as Doctor Who for the character gives me a chuckle.

Anyway, I think the majority of people in this thread think the guy is attacking cosplay as a hobby. I don't think he's doing that directly. He's trying to show escapism in general is rising, and using cosplay as an example of such. And from there, asking why are people looking to escapism. Ergo, the economy.

Really, I think the only reason cosplay is getting such a hit is because it's such an obvious form of escapism. Watching a sports game takes 2 hours or so, same thing for watching a film or someone logging onto CoD for a night. But cosplay is a serious commitment, and it's not as socially acceptable because it's a bit more fantastic. You could argue someone wearing a famous athlete's jersey is a form of cosplay, but sports enthusiasm is widely accepted in western culture. In fact it's highly encouraged, with all the advertisements, sponsorship deals, etc that people forget that watching (and playing) IS escapism.

Cosplay is on the fringes of accepted western culture, and it's flashy. Where as a guy in a jersey you would't think twice about, if you saw Sailor Moon just walking down the street, it will turn some heads. That's why it's being discussed in this article. Not that he's trying to say it's a poor hobby etc etc.
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