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Post Reply The Universe is big. Like, REALLY big.
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Posted 11/1/14
How big is the universe? Far bigger than we can conceive. Want to really feel overwhelmed? Just look at how big our Solar System is. Our solar system is bigger than we can conceive.

Here is a very accurate, virtually to scale representation of the size of our solar system.

http://joshworth.com/dev/pixelspace/pixelspace_solarsystem.html

Pro-tip: When scrolling over, you are going to want to press your scroll-wheel down and then move the cursor to the right to make scrolling much more bearable. Also, don't check this out at school or work. It'll take too long to do.


I encourage people to try and stay with this to the end. It'll give you some idea of just how big our solar system is.

Once you have a better understanding (but still incredibly vague) of just how big our solar system is, just remember that the solar system is an ABSOLUTELY TINY part of our galaxy, and that our galaxy is an ABSOLUTELY TINY part of the known universe (and we only have an idea of how big of the universe is up to a certain point; we don't really know just how big it is).
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Posted 11/1/14
Checked out part of the website and it's pretty cool, and gives you a great idea of just how big our own solar system really is too. Got to the part that says 'Turns out things are pretty far apart out here' or something like that. Will check out the rest some other time, probably tomorrow after work, as I'm actually feeling pretty exhausted right now.
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Posted 11/1/14

BlackRose0607 wrote:

Checked out part of the website and it's pretty cool, and gives you a great idea of just how big our own solar system really is too. Got to the part that says 'Turns out things are pretty far apart out here' or something like that. Will check out the rest some other time, probably tomorrow after work, as I'm actually feeling pretty exhausted right now.



Yeah, if you scroll the whole way, it takes a little while, but it'll give you some sort of idea of just how big the solar system is, even if it is just a vague grasp of it. And if you try to contemplate the distance of the sun to Pluto, you should keep in mind that the planets revolve around the sun, and that the full span of Pluto's orbit, from one point to another point 180 degrees later in orbit, would be all that distance scrolling to the right in addition to the same length in the opposite direction; to the left of the sun.
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Posted 11/1/14
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a good read. As I recall, he explains a lot about the vastness of space in the first few chapters. The main idea is that without developing a method for faster-than-light travel, reaching anything beyond the edges of our galaxy is sufficiently time-consuming as to be considered completely impractical, thus making it nearly impossible to believe that our planet could have received any visits from aliens during the relatively small amount of time that humans have existed on Earth.
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Posted 11/1/14
I gave up after Jupiter.

Also, "Earth. You are here" I never would've guessed...
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Posted 11/1/14

staphen wrote:

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a good read. As I recall, he explains a lot about the vastness of space in the first few chapters. The main idea is that without developing a method for faster-than-light travel, reaching anything beyond the edges of our galaxy is sufficiently time-consuming as to be considered completely impractical, thus making it nearly impossible to believe that our planet could have received any visits from aliens during the relatively small amount of time that humans have existed on Earth.



Let's say there were alien beings from another planet that were very technologically advanced and have traveled to Earth...but can not travel faster than the speed of light...they'd have to come from our own galaxy. Only way highly advanced aliens could travel from another galaxy to our galaxy would be through some sort of space travel that is faster than light, whether that be warp drives or worm holes (or both, or something else entirely). Otherwise, if they couldn't travel at the speed of light or faster, like you said, it'd just take too long for them to go from one galaxy to our galaxy and to Earth, and I just don't think any of them would bother with it.
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Posted 11/1/14
Pretty neat, haven't seen this particular model before so thanks for sharing it.

Another visualization method I've seen/heard for the scale of our solar system is thus: If the sun were a basketball placed at one end of a football field, the Earth would be the size of an apple seed placed at the 30 yard line. At this scale, Jupiter would be a golf ball placed 150 yards away.

Looks like we'd need to use a bigger field.
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Posted 11/1/14
Damn, i love thinking about the Universe and all the crazy possibilities of what is out there, what other planets look like and contain. How unfathomably huge the Universe is...its all so amazing
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Posted 11/1/14
It's truly amazing how big the universe is.
My favorite image of earth is the Pale Blue Dot which shows us how small we are

From NASA


This narrow-angle color image of the Earth, dubbed 'Pale Blue Dot', is a part of the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by Voyager 1. The spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar system from a distance of more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. From Voyager's great distance Earth is a mere point of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. This blown-up image of the Earth was taken through three color filters -- violet, blue and green -- and recombined to produce the color image. The background features in the image are artifacts resulting from the magnification.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14

the_spaceguy wrote:

Damn, i love thinking about the Universe and all the crazy possibilities of what is out there, what other planets look like and contain. How unfathomably huge the Universe is...its all so amazing



You know I believe it coming from a guy named "the spaceguy"




iriomote wrote:

Pretty neat, haven't seen this particular model before so thanks for sharing it.

Another visualization method I've seen/heard for the scale of our solar system is thus: If the sun were a basketball placed at one end of a football field, the Earth would be the size of an apple seed placed at the 30 yard line. At this scale, Jupiter would be a golf ball placed 150 yards away.

Looks like we'd need to use a bigger field.



I saw on a TV show someone try to explain what atoms are like. They were standing in a tennis court. They had some granules of sugar in the palm of their hand, glistening in the sunlight. They said if those granules of sugar were protons and neutrons and then place in the center of the tennis court, the electrons would be at the fences (so it is a rectangle tennis court, and if you go in the direction were the tennis court is longer, go past the boundaries of the tennis court, and go to the fence, it'd be that far away). Like the link in the OP says at one of the lines of text, not only is the universe mostly empty space, but atoms and molecules are mostly empty space, as well.

But actually, that "empty space" isn't really empty space, we are finding. Not only is there some electromagnetic energy in that 'empty space' in atoms, but if you consider the empty space in outer space...many scientist believe there are mysterious things such as "dark energy" and dark matter" in this "empty space". This dark energy and dark matter must exist in the spaces in matter, too, I'm sure (so it'd be all around us here on Earth, too).
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Posted 11/1/14

Dubnoman wrote:


staphen wrote:

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a good read. As I recall, he explains a lot about the vastness of space in the first few chapters. The main idea is that without developing a method for faster-than-light travel, reaching anything beyond the edges of our galaxy is sufficiently time-consuming as to be considered completely impractical, thus making it nearly impossible to believe that our planet could have received any visits from aliens during the relatively small amount of time that humans have existed on Earth.



Let's say there were alien beings from another planet that were very technologically advanced and have traveled to Earth...but can not travel faster than the speed of light...they'd have to come from our own galaxy. Only way highly advanced aliens could travel from another galaxy to our galaxy would be through some sort of space travel that is faster than light, whether that be warp drives or worm holes (or both, or something else entirely). Otherwise, if they couldn't travel at the speed of light or faster, like you said, it'd just take too long for them to go from one galaxy to our galaxy and to Earth, and I just don't think any of them would bother with it.


The way I see it, there are three conceivable ways to make the trip across the distance between galaxies. The first, as I mentioned, is faster than light travel which, as I understand it, is very likely impossible. The second would be to temporarily decrease the distance between points in space, a concept that I'm quite sure completely defies the laws of physics. The third would be to create a self-sustaining ecosystem on an artificial landmass with its own propulsion so that it can move across the universe at what would equate to a snail's pace at that scale. I expect this option would require the creation of energy and countless generations of the species that live in that ecosystem, assuming they don't come up with a way for an individual to live forever. Moving at that speed, it would take so much time that there's really no conceivable way that a sufficiently advanced species of aliens could have made the trip even if they had specifically targeted Earth and made a beeline for us from a nearby galaxy.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14

staphen wrote:



The second one you mentioned must be the "worm hole" concept, huh?
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Posted 11/1/14
The universe is not that big, maybe 6 or 7 miles tops. I am pretty sure the stars of the night sky is just the sun refracting and creating the illusion of many stars
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14

staphen wrote:


Dubnoman wrote:


staphen wrote:

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a good read. As I recall, he explains a lot about the vastness of space in the first few chapters. The main idea is that without developing a method for faster-than-light travel, reaching anything beyond the edges of our galaxy is sufficiently time-consuming as to be considered completely impractical, thus making it nearly impossible to believe that our planet could have received any visits from aliens during the relatively small amount of time that humans have existed on Earth.



Let's say there were alien beings from another planet that were very technologically advanced and have traveled to Earth...but can not travel faster than the speed of light...they'd have to come from our own galaxy. Only way highly advanced aliens could travel from another galaxy to our galaxy would be through some sort of space travel that is faster than light, whether that be warp drives or worm holes (or both, or something else entirely). Otherwise, if they couldn't travel at the speed of light or faster, like you said, it'd just take too long for them to go from one galaxy to our galaxy and to Earth, and I just don't think any of them would bother with it.


The way I see it, there are three conceivable ways to make the trip across the distance between galaxies. The first, as I mentioned, is faster than light travel which, as I understand it, is very likely impossible. The second would be to temporarily decrease the distance between points in space, a concept that I'm quite sure completely defies the laws of physics. The third would be to create a self-sustaining ecosystem on an artificial landmass with its own propulsion so that it can move across the universe at what would equate to a snail's pace at that scale. I expect this option would require the creation of energy and countless generations of the species that live in that ecosystem, assuming they don't come up with a way for an individual to live forever. Moving at that speed, it would take so much time that there's really no conceivable way that a sufficiently advanced species of aliens could have made the trip even if they had specifically targeted Earth and made a beeline for us from a nearby galaxy.


The Big Bang expanded space faster than the speed of light though. Much, much, much faster. The light-speed limit only applies within space so the warp drive can combine the movements of space behind you with your own speed to move faster than light without breaking any laws. This was thought to be nigh-impossible since it was calculated to take energy equivalent to Jupiter's mass but scientists have recently figured out how to dramatically reduce this to the value of a small spaceship by altering the shape of how space would be bent.

This is off the wall but if we can conjure up some sorcery of keeping our consciousness to the matter, we can just quantum teleport there with quantum entanglement.

Did the aliens ever build faster-than-light-speed travel though? If they did(seems possible in our future), then they should have been able to visit us... but we haven't sighted them so that's saying something. I don't think the reason why aliens haven't visited us is because of speed problems.



Honestly though, I would be more impressed if all that space wasn't empty. It just seems to be a gigantic waste to me.
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Posted 11/1/14 , edited 11/1/14
Oh come on, I would love to do this another 6,771 more times to see what's past Pluto. I was able to watch maybe the second half of Log Horizon, and finished Karen Senki, and stopping to read the words in my peripheral vision.
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