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Post Reply The Universe is big. Like, REALLY big.
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30 / M / Vancouver, BC, Ca...
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Posted 11/3/14

Dubnoman


Edit: Ha...my info is probably outdated. The article I found on google is from 2004.

http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/05/24/universe.wide/index.html?_s=PM:TECH


Well THERE'S yer problem... Don't trust CNN for anything other than the weather report, even then take it with a grain of salt.

Coincidentally when I was writing my post a current as of 2013 space science program was on that was talking about the age and size of the known universe. I just CP'ed what they said lol.
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Posted 11/3/14
If universes infinitely expand, then it's more likely that there are other universes of varying properties out there like a pack of bubbles. I wouldn't be surprised if witchcraft and dragons existed out there since we already have the sorcery known as quantum mechanics that react to our conscious observation.
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Posted 11/3/14
Quantum mechanics react to our conscious observation?
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30 / M / Central KY.
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Posted 11/3/14
Here's another Chart.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Star_Chart.jpg

I left the Link to it above so You can dip in and read the Words.
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Posted 11/3/14 , edited 11/3/14

Dubnoman wrote:

Quantum mechanics react to our conscious observation?


I meant it like with Schrodinger's cat. It is both dead and alive until you see it which then makes it choose one state at random. Even Einstein found it spooky.

It makes you think about the "If a tree falls and nobody is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" puzzle a different way.
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Posted 11/3/14 , edited 11/3/14

staphen

Dubnoman

staphen wrote:

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson is a good read. As I recall, he explains a lot about the vastness of space in the first few chapters. The main idea is that without developing a method for faster-than-light travel, reaching anything beyond the edges of our galaxy is sufficiently time-consuming as to be considered completely impractical, thus making it nearly impossible to believe that our planet could have received any visits from aliens during the relatively small amount of time that humans have existed on Earth.



Let's say there were alien beings from another planet that were very technologically advanced and have traveled to Earth...but can not travel faster than the speed of light...they'd have to come from our own galaxy. Only way highly advanced aliens could travel from another galaxy to our galaxy would be through some sort of space travel that is faster than light, whether that be warp drives or worm holes (or both, or something else entirely). Otherwise, if they couldn't travel at the speed of light or faster, like you said, it'd just take too long for them to go from one galaxy to our galaxy and to Earth, and I just don't think any of them would bother with it.


The way I see it, there are three conceivable ways to make the trip across the distance between galaxies. The first, as I mentioned, is faster than light travel which, as I understand it, is very likely impossible. The second would be to temporarily decrease the distance between points in space, a concept that I'm quite sure completely defies the laws of physics. The third would be to create a self-sustaining ecosystem on an artificial landmass with its own propulsion so that it can move across the universe at what would equate to a snail's pace at that scale. I expect this option would require the creation of energy and countless generations of the species that live in that ecosystem, assuming they don't come up with a way for an individual to live forever. Moving at that speed, it would take so much time that there's really no conceivable way that a sufficiently advanced species of aliens could have made the trip even if they had specifically targeted Earth and made a beeline for us from a nearby galaxy.

Worm Holes, while theoretically sound, require absolutely insane amounts of energy to stabilize, let alone create one sizable enough to be of any practical use - such a means of travel, if possible, could take thousands of years of consistent technological development, and an energy output on the levels of stars to make such a notion possible. Tapping into the energy of black holes are often a talking point regarding the power-problem, if that gives any perspective. Negative energy is the likeliest candidate.

Warp Drives are also theoretically feasible, and take much less energy to boot. They still require energy far beyond what we can output today, however. Star Trek probably had it right with an anti-matter reactor to power a warp-drive - the problem is producing antimatter. As it currently stands, antimatter is the rarest known applicable material in the world (and most expensive to produce), at a whopping $250 million for 10 milligrams of positrons, or $25 billion per gram -- a warp-drive would take much, much more antimatter to be a functional power-source. Until we develop a much more effective way to produce antimatter, such an avenue is out of the question. And while we may know its theoretical feasibility, actually creating a warp-field even if we had the energy, will require technology and a much more acute understanding of the universe and its physics to be able to pull off such a feat. Negative energy is still probably the more likely candidate, however.

The recurring issue with superluminal travel, as you can see, is with the required energy output. Of course, the exact mechanics and technological implementation is also a massive undertaking that's far beyond what we're currently capable of, but the most monumental issue scientists seem to agree on is the energy problem -- none of this is remotely possible without a power-source that's possibly centuries beyond our current grasp.
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Posted 11/3/14

RedExodus wrote:

I meant it like with Schrodinger's cat. It is both dead and alive until you see it which then makes it choose one state at random. Even Einstein found it spooky.

It makes you think about the "If a tree falls and nobody is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" puzzle a different way.


Except it's never really been proven. If memory serves...it's more of a theory.

Also, technically, no. It makes vibrations in the air that are only sound when they reach the ear-drum.
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Posted 11/3/14
"We were born too early to travel the galaxy and born too late to explore the Earth."

I wonder what interstellar travel will be like...
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Posted 11/3/14

x-Cellar_Door-x wrote:

Here's another Chart.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Star_Chart.jpg

I left the Link to it above so You can dip in and read the Words.


I didn't really understand what they were trying to say due to the inconsistencies in grammar, unfortunately.
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33 / M / outer wall, level...
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Posted 11/3/14
the only really feasable idea is a project orion style seed ship. multi generational. but then its the human pshycology thats the problem.
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Posted 11/3/14 , edited 11/3/14

Phersu wrote:


RedExodus wrote:

I meant it like with Schrodinger's cat. It is both dead and alive until you see it which then makes it choose one state at random. Even Einstein found it spooky.

It makes you think about the "If a tree falls and nobody is around to hear it, does it make a sound?" puzzle a different way.


Except it's never really been proven. If memory serves...it's more of a theory.

Also, technically, no. It makes vibrations in the air that are only sound when they reach the ear-drum.


Of course, as with most scientific theories, quantum mechanics/quantum theory can't be proven. It is quite supported like with evolution however and it has been consistently shown in the lab. Einstein himself was so uncomfortable with how real it seemed that he died trying to disprove it and find a better explanation, but that never happened. He believed god does not play dice with the universe.

""If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet."
Niels Bohr "

The definition of sound depends on whether you're using the definition from physics or physiology/psychology but that's beyond the point.
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Posted 11/3/14
@RedExodus: Tell us more about Schrodinger's cat. I don't know much about it. Tell us about it, and why they think it could be truthful.
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Posted 11/3/14

RedExodus wrote:

Of course, as with most scientific theories, quantum mechanics/quantum theory can't be proven. It is quite supported like with evolution however and it has been consistently shown in the lab. Einstein himself was so uncomfortable with how real it seemed that he died trying to disprove it and find a better explanation, but that never happened. He believed god does not play dice with the universe.

""If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet."
Niels Bohr "

The definition of sound depends on whether you're using the definition from physics or physiology/psychology but that's beyond the point.


I would, if I was a god.
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Posted 11/3/14 , edited 11/3/14

Dubnoman wrote:

@RedExodus: Tell us more about Schrodinger's cat. I don't know much about it. Tell us about it, and why they think it could be truthful.

Is this commonly taught in schools? I thought all physics classes taught quantum mechanics

The cat represents a particle and it can have different properties or be in different locations simultaneously. This is what creates things like light waves which is represented when the cat is both dead+alive. Particles are waves one and the same but you can only see it as a particle or a wave, not both at the same time.

In a famous double-slit experiment, they shot photon particles through 2 openings and when they observed where the particles ended up, they were in 3 places that were only possible if each particle entered both of the gates simultaneously, creating wave motion and interference. With one gate(one possibility) though, this phenomenon completely disappeared and there was no evidence of absurd motion.

In other words, with enough particles, a particle enters both gates as a wave, bumps into itself thereby altering its own course, and went into 3 main possible locations at the same time instead of 2. When the end location was observed, the wave collapsed into particles, each at only 1 position.

In another main version of that experiment that Einstein used as a basis for his own experiments, they redid the double-slit experiment except they tried to observe which gate a photon would go through at the exact time that it passes. The photon then only passed one gate rather than both and there was no wave function.


There's actually more freaky things about quantum mechanics like quantum entanglement which is even less understood, when particles split in certain ways will mirror each others' properties at the exact same time like voodoo dolls. This worked across distances faster than information could travel(light-speed). Einstein dubbed this as "spooky action at a distance". I'm not gunna go deep into this, lol.
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Posted 11/4/14
To sum it up = the universe is really big. ok. great. no go do something useful with you life. LIKE ANIME
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