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Is anime slowly kicking the bucket? Hideaki Anno Interview.
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24 / F / Johnstown, PA, USA
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Posted 11/8/14
It's called "fluctuation." It's natural part of just about any cycle; however, far too many people are taught that the only direction for business success is up, and that decline is automatically disastrous.
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Posted 11/8/14
It makes sense that Hideaki succeeded from working with no money in mind since studies show that people who do it for the money generally play it safe and don't put in as much creativity.
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30 / M / Ontario
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Posted 11/8/14

Fuddbender wrote:

IMO

Part of it is all the people here on CR who don't have a star next to their name. They come here to watch the streams and that's it. They don't pay a membership. You could always come up with excuses for why you don't contribute to the industry you "love" so much. But we all have bills to pay, we all gotta eat. But throw the industry a bone people.

Have a lovely day, all.


Tehee, i see what you did there!

Get a job you bums! Support what you love or quit complainin! (not saying anyone is but hey... someone will)
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F / The Far Shore
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Posted 11/8/14
my life wouldn't be amazing if hideaki anno didn't say negative soul crushing things
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31 / M / Bellingham WA, USA
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Posted 11/8/14
All I know is that if the anime industry was the way Hideaki Anno wanted it to be, I probably wouldn't like anime very much.

It's fair to say that he's mostly famous for making a deconstruction anime, correct? Well, you have to actually have the basis of something that's worth deconstructing in the first place for that to even work out. And if everyone was up their own asses like he tends to be I don't think there would be much of anything that's very interesting being churned out. Anime would basically become a series of artsy French films.

Honestly the dude is kind of a huge hipster, and has been since before hipster was even a coined phrase. And that's great and all. Some awesome, unique works can get made by people like him. But the whole rest of the industry shouldn't just be thrown under the bus.
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Posted 11/8/14

Haaaaa!!!
Ask Crunchyroll about it. Alexa ranking is good Rank 2,124 Globaly and Rank 462 in the states.

Even now we throw money at Kicktarter Anime like Under the Dog, Santa Company and Little Witch Academia because the population that watch anime is so diversified now in comparison to back in the 90s (When Fansub and Streaming legally not even existed)
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27 / M / Mor Dhona
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Posted 11/8/14

aeb0717 wrote:

It's called "fluctuation." It's natural part of just about any cycle; however, far too many people are taught that the only direction for business success is up, and that decline is automatically disastrous.


That's... sort of the problem. Japanese investors aren't likely to take risks; why gamble on a risky, edgy new show when you can go with a moé show or a harem show? The former has more potential, but the latter is more certain to get a return on your investment; which would you go with?

It's not just an anime industry problem either. Why do you suppose all we really get anymore are big-budget CGI spectacle superhero movies? They're the most likely bet to receive a return on your investment, so...


IngramIV wrote:


Haaaaa!!!
Ask Crunchyroll about it. Alexa ranking is good Rank 2,124 Globaly and Rank 462 in the states.

Even now we throw money at Kicktarter Anime like Under the Dog, Santa Company and Little Witch Academia because the population that watch anime is so diversified now in comparison to back in the 90s (When Fansub and Streaming legally not even existed)


When anime producers / directors do interviews like this, I'd be willing to bet they're taking into account only how the industry feels regionally. Another thing the Japanese don't do a lot of (if memory serves; if not, call me on it) is contribute to things like Kickstarter. As explained above, there's no guarantee you'll get a return on your investment, and why gamble on something potentially lucrative when you can go with a smaller but more certain profit? Westerners are more likely to take these sorts of risks, perhaps because of our idealization of "hitting it big."

... most Kickstarter funding comes from Western territories. Though not direct anime (I can't think of one off the top of my head), Keiji Inafune's Mighty No. 9, his spiritual successor to Mega Man after it got cancelled due to poor sales, was funded through Kickstarter; most of that funding came from Western territories. I read an interview with Inafune somewhere (an old GameInformer, I think) where he basically explained the differences between Western and Eastern markets as this; Japanese investors don't like to take risks, which is why you get sequel upon sequel upon sequel. Western companies are more liable to take risks, though as a series like Call of Duty may suggest, we're beginning to fall into the same stagnant rut as well.

It's just a difference in market strategies. Anime is produced to appeal to the regional market before the international market, and the regional (Japanese) market is eating up moé and harem shows, so that's what we're getting a lot of. We also used to get only choice shows that were known to sell before internet simulcasting, and now that we can see everything as it's produced and aired, we're finding out that most anime is not that great.
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Posted 11/8/14

Genbu89 wrote:


aeb0717 wrote:

It's called "fluctuation." It's natural part of just about any cycle; however, far too many people are taught that the only direction for business success is up, and that decline is automatically disastrous.


That's... sort of the problem. Japanese investors aren't likely to take risks; why gamble on a risky, edgy new show when you can go with a moé show or a harem show? The former has more potential, but the latter is more certain to get a return on your investment; which would you go with?

It's not just an anime industry problem either. Why do you suppose all we really get anymore are big-budget CGI spectacle superhero movies? They're the most likely bet to receive a return on your investment, so...


IngramIV wrote:


Haaaaa!!!
Ask Crunchyroll about it. Alexa ranking is good Rank 2,124 Globaly and Rank 462 in the states.

Even now we throw money at Kicktarter Anime like Under the Dog, Santa Company and Little Witch Academia because the population that watch anime is so diversified now in comparison to back in the 90s (When Fansub and Streaming legally not even existed)


When anime producers / directors do interviews like this, I'd be willing to bet they're taking into account only how the industry feels regionally. Another thing the Japanese don't do a lot of (if memory serves; if not, call me on it) is contribute to things like Kickstarter. As explained above, there's no guarantee you'll get a return on your investment, and why gamble on something potentially lucrative when you can go with a smaller but more certain profit? Westerners are more likely to take these sorts of risks, perhaps because of our idealization of "hitting it big."

... most Kickstarter funding comes from Western territories. Though not direct anime (I can't think of one off the top of my head), Keiji Inafune's Mighty No. 9, his spiritual successor to Mega Man after it got cancelled due to poor sales, was funded through Kickstarter; most of that funding came from Western territories. I read an interview with Inafune somewhere (an old GameInformer, I think) where he basically explained the differences between Western and Eastern markets as this; Japanese investors don't like to take risks, which is why you get sequel upon sequel upon sequel. Western companies are more liable to take risks, though as a series like Call of Duty may suggest, we're beginning to fall into the same stagnant rut as well.

It's just a difference in market strategies. Anime is produced to appeal to the regional market before the international market, and the regional (Japanese) market is eating up moé and harem shows, so that's what we're getting a lot of. We also used to get only choice shows that were known to sell before internet simulcasting, and now that we can see everything as it's produced and aired, we're finding out that most anime is not that great.


One thing that we can take it from granted that Anime Industry is growing in the west at the consumer point of view and not the investor point of view. Example those Canadians making a kicktarter about something urban, is solemnly of Consumer investment not in Big backed companies inversion. Not even Popular companies such Nickelodeon take it for granted on anime grown for consumer in the case of The Lgend of Korra.

Anime and it`s relatives such Visual Novels and Manga have near low grown for opportunity in western because no one is for sure how it will land. This explain the Tons of Fansubs of all areas vs Funimation and Crunchyroll.
This idea is granted that why have Conventions in the wester like Sakura Con ect ect.

In Resume
Western Companys support Little risk,
Consumer Support A lot

Japan Company Support A lot for old content yet lack of innovations
Consumer support Mid range what they want innovation. No wonder why Terraformers is ranking kick up.

The industry is not bad, just the are of investment have to be expanded a bit.
bhl88 
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28 / M / USA
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Posted 11/8/14


No, it still hasn't died yet.
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Posted 11/8/14
I have been watching anime for a very long time now and i have to say that this is one of the best years of anime that i have seen in a long time.

The biggest problem i can see is there are less and less anime being made to get new people into anime. The anime industry will be just fine as long as there are people who will continue to support it. the problem is not what is being made its that the generation that supports it is getting older and older. they make moe and herem series because thats what they want its what sell. They are not actively trying to get the newer generation into anime so they have to make shows that will appeal to the older generation just to make back the money they spent to produce it.
Posted 11/8/14

AiYumega wrote:

Lol everything is always "dying". The record industry has been "dying" since the 80's. Film industry has "been dying" since the 90's. Video game industry "has been dying" since the 00's.

Yet every single one is still around and making a whole lot of money.

Everything's been "dying" ffs. I understand the sentiment, but so long as there is still anime being made, nothing is dying. I hate these, they genuinely piss me the hell off.

You look at the young Western generations, these kids 13 and up, and they're all getting into anime and manga. Sure, they only watch dubbed anime, or don't know about it fully, but guess what? They're still watching anime and reading manga.




"Now, many other Asian countries are acquiring more disposable income. I think the soil is rich there for animation to grow. On the other hand, if Japan keeps losing money, we won't be able to continue making animation anymore and probably just fade away. I don't know how the economy will turn out, but the number of animators is steadily decreasing. If less people are working in the animation industry, things will naturally taper off. It probably won't be an environment that lets us do the same type of interesting work that we can do now. But I think other countries in the world will take our place. I think animation will certainly live on somewhere, just not necessarily in Japan"

this is important, you're getting angry but you're from America and don't particular see what the industry is like and if it's really that inspired. He was actually saying that in Japan he has doubts on whether they can keep producing anime as they had once done with vitality, it's obvious that it's changed a lot.
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39 / M / Florida
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Posted 11/8/14
It's been said, I've said it, many have said it...
You can only watch the same story so many times, regardless of whatever dog, cat, panda, monkey, alien, demon, or human is in it.
The only thing that's new is the work being done on computers over paper and things looking and keeping a lot better.
Nothing actually dies, it just evolves... Sometimes devolves.
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27 / M
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Posted 11/8/14
I agree with his assessment. The cost of anime production has remained the same for the past 15 years and the quality from some studios has increased. Something has to give. You'll either have to limit the animation like Toei and Perriot or increase the time and budget to take the stress off staff. If that doesn't happen I can see the anime industry going CG, which would be a nightmare for me.
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22 / F / Washington
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Posted 11/8/14

PeripheralVisionary wrote:


Dropplet wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:


Dropplet wrote:


AzazelOfNexium wrote:



I 100% agree with that point. I think the main problem isn't really the industry itself, i think its most of the shows being made recently are just uninspired (my personal opinion though). There seem to be just too many harem shows that follow the same basic story line, and have the same characters but with different hair colors.

I think if we get some triple AAA shows like SnK, Psycho Pass, SAO, and even good long running shows like Hunter X Hunter 2011; we will see an even bigger boost in the anime industry.

I think shows like those are great for bringing in new fans. I even got my sister into anime due to SnK. I made her watch it when she was 11 (surprised she wasn't scarred for life).

I just think animation companies need to think less about profits, and more about taking a risk to create a work of art, instead of just a product.


Agreed. Haoyo Miyozaki also said that he believes the anime industry is failing because of "Otakus." I know you all are probably thinking... "But Otakus are the fans! How are they ruining it????" Well my dear children... just sit down and learn.

"Otaku" is a word in Japan that is not a good one. Otaku has negative connotations that many people in Japan look down upon. It's not just a simple "anime fan" but rather a low life who sits in his mother basement at the age of 30/40 with no job and basically is a lazy piece of garbage or have mega fetishes and love these animes that are all the same . These Otaku's love the Harems with the moe girl with big boobs and no plots. They are the ones who are coming up with the ideas that are all the same or demanding for these types of animes... which is why they anime industry is going down because they know that it will make some money and is an easy audience to target.

Here is a video that pretty much describes what really happens
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXJ27KHa4Ck


The negative connotations usually lie with the older Japanese and those who embrace the mainstream. Some people embrace the word Otaku and think nothing wrong with the meaning. In other words, the definition depends on the demographic. A self proclaimed Otaku might think there's nothing wrong with being one, but middle school girl would think otherwise.


Well in the West people say it's an anime fan but in Japan it's not a good thing. I've seen lots of anime where they gasps at the sight of an Otaku


This is what Wikipedia told me about the term. Anyway, do they gasp at a stereotypical Otaku, the word Otaku, or someone who is just a fan? The prejudice is aimed at the fandom regardless of whatever name is used. They believe in the stereotypes and whatnot.


Basically it's like theres a huge difference between a fan and an Otaku. Otakus obsess over either video games, computers, or anime. It just is looked down upon. But they obess to the point where it's almost unhealthy.
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23 / M / Beyond The Wall
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Posted 11/8/14
As long as the industry doesnt die before Jojo's Bizarre Adventure is finished getting animated
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