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Is anime slowly kicking the bucket? Hideaki Anno Interview.
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15 / M / right here
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Posted 11/9/14
more of a slump then anything else
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31 / M / Bellingham WA, USA
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Posted 11/9/14
http://animetics.net/2013/10/12/fun-with-numbers-the-anime-industry-is-demonstrably-healthy-and-not-dying/

Interesting article from a year ago that shows that anime isn't declining in the slightest. Hideaki Anno's issues with "lack of creativity" are another matter, but those types of opinions are very subjective.
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Posted 11/9/14
I wish I had a dollar for every time anyone has said "anime is dying" over the past 40 years. I'd be set.
Posted 11/9/14
Aren't we all.
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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 11/11/14
Several years ago I did a little research project on a whim. I found it extraordinary that anime and manga were "booming" yet we were importing all, or nearly all of it. I did some census taking, researched specific topics on the internet, did some thinking, and arrived at several conclusions.

1. The vast majority of people would watch an anime or read a manga as long as it was good, regardless of whether or not it came from Japan. So it's not technically a problem with the viewers/readers.

2. We apparently just suck at drawing it. I do not know if this is still the case, but I'm betting it is. Part of the problem is that realism is the cornerstone of the art style, learning the rules before you break them. Most people who want to draw anime didn't sign on to study human anatomy.

3. We lack formal educational options for it, unlike Japan, which leads me to ---

4. Westerners are shit at educating themselves. I'm not talking about perusing Google and Wikipedia when you want to know something. I'm talking about creating projects, curricula, objective-based years of work and really going for it. Most people don't have the patience or the masochism for any such endeavor, which is why most college programs exist in the first place.

5. The tech isn't quite cheap and/or accessible enough yet.


That last one is the major obstacle. Great strides have been made, but when a half-decent anime can be made by at most a small team of people with the right tech, conversations like this will disappear.
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33 / M / Seattle
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Posted 11/11/14
I don't exactly see the industry as dying here. Not if there are 40+ shows coming out every season when it was not too long ago that 25 shows was considered to be a heavy season. Obviously, easier access to watching these shows legally has contributed to it. But it's niche status is always something that will hold it back.
Upeksa 
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Posted 11/11/14 , edited 11/11/14
I think this happens when an industry tries to keep doing the same thing while not realizing that the times have changed and they need new forms of distribution and new bussiness strategies. The music industry was in crisis because it wanted to keep selling CDs when people wanted to get stuff digitally, eventually they adapted or they would have died. Similar adaptations have to happen in manga and anime, they need to make actual efforts to make their production available worldwide with a low entry level (cost-wise). Also, thinking about a global audience instead of just the Japanese one could lead to some innovation in storytelling, instead of doing the same thing over and over again.

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23 / M / Bolton, England
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Posted 11/11/14
It seems to still be doing better than it ever has, we'll see.

If a company dies, 50 more will replace it.
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Posted 11/11/14
It's stagnating in innovation because people aren't bored of having the same thing over and over again yet.
Posted 11/11/14
Even if it is not dying, it is dying for me...all my favorite animes are old old old! I might like a few new ones but not love them...or maybe I'm getting old
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21 / M / Puerto Rico
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Posted 11/11/14
Well established points, but I would state it's more of a slump than a fall.
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Posted 11/11/14

AzazelOfNexium wrote:



I 100% agree with that point. I think the main problem isn't really the industry itself, i think its most of the shows being made recently are just uninspired (my personal opinion though). There seem to be just too many harem shows that follow the same basic story line, and have the same characters but with different hair colors.

I think if we get some triple AAA shows like SnK, Psycho Pass, SAO, and even good long running shows like Hunter X Hunter 2011; we will see an even bigger boost in the anime industry.

I think shows like those are great for bringing in new fans. I even got my sister into anime due to SnK. I made her watch it when she was 11 (surprised she wasn't scarred for life).

I just think animation companies need to think less about profits, and more about taking a risk to create a work of art, instead of just a product.


I completely agree. In my opinion, the anime's nowadays are cliché with the story lines and if they thought more about how the story would play out, then maybe industry would be back up on it's feet even better then they are now. I know its not easy to create captivating stories, but in the end, it will be worth risk.
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22 / M / NJ, USA
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Posted 11/11/14 , edited 11/11/14
With all these anime production studios playing it safe by adhering to cliches and taking fewer risks, it's no wonder the industry is stagnating. Nowadays, the anime produced these days are far less memorable than what was produced before whereas the quota isn't as much as to sell quality anime but the licensed merchandise (figures, key chains, love pillows, etc.). This is why some studios are going indie and relying on crowd-sourcing to create their own independent anime without being hampered by some suit whose M.O. is to line his/her pockets regardless of what he/she's selling.

However, from what I've heard, given that the economy there is awful, It's understandable that these studios are desperate and aren't creating anime with the same intentions as any gung-ho studio, but rather to give all their employees a workable income. Instead of trying to push the boundaries in terms of aesthetics, these studios need to focus more on creating better, and more original stories.
Upeksa 
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Posted 11/11/14

Chopsuey9444 wrote:

With all these anime production studios playing it safe by adhering to cliches and taking fewer risks, it's no wonder the industry is stagnating. Nowadays, the anime produced these days are far less memorable than what was produced before whereas the quota isn't as much as to sell quality anime but the licensed merchandise (figures, key chains, love pillows, etc.). This is why some studios are going indie and relying on crowd-sourcing to create their own independent anime without being hampered by some money-grubbing suit.


If we are to believe Anno, it is not in decline because they don't take risks but instead they don't take risks because it is in decline. When you barely make enough money to keep your studio afloat you can't afford to do something radically different and risk the project failing, you have to make sure you get at least some level of popularity so you go with formulas and themes that are known to have been popular in the past.
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22 / M / NJ, USA
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Posted 11/11/14

Upeksa wrote:


Chopsuey9444 wrote:

With all these anime production studios playing it safe by adhering to cliches and taking fewer risks, it's no wonder the industry is stagnating. Nowadays, the anime produced these days are far less memorable than what was produced before whereas the quota isn't as much as to sell quality anime but the licensed merchandise (figures, key chains, love pillows, etc.). This is why some studios are going indie and relying on crowd-sourcing to create their own independent anime without being hampered by some money-grubbing suit.


If we are to believe Anno, it is not in decline because they don't take risks but instead they don't take risks because it is in decline. When you barely make enough money to keep your studio afloat you can't afford to do something radically different and risk the project failing, you have to make sure you get at least some level of popularity so you go with formulas and themes that are known to have been popular in the past.


Yes, but the consumers are starting to get frustrated by what's being produced. The industry is stuck in an infinite loop that's starting to dwindle around the borders and it's unfortunate that the problem itself isn't tied to just the anime industry. However, sometimes it's necessary for a business to take a leap of faith or else they'll slowly whittle themselves to the ground. I suggest these big industries follow suit with crowd-sourcing as I feel that it is what can save the industry.
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