Cultural Exchange - High School
8194 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Ontario Canada
Offline
Posted 11/14/14
Hi there!

I'm from Ontario, Canada and I am currently attending high school.

My question for you is, what is high school like in your country? Or, if you're already past that - how was high school?

At my high school it ranges from grades 9-12b. 9, 10, 11, 12, 12b and has two terms. 12b is an extra year in which you can attend if you didn't acquire enough credits for university or college. Some 12b students only attend for one class a day, because that's all they need. We offer things at our school called "Specialist High Skill Majors" (HSM). High skill majors earn you your Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). in the areas arts and culture, health and wellness, manufacturing, and transportation. Arts and culture range from acting, to film making, to cooking. Health and wellness is a more scientific based HSM, it's all about proper eating habits, and how your muscles take on nutrition. Manufacturing and Transportation I'm not too sure on the difference, I've never looked into them, but they focus on things like welding and mechanics on vehicles.
We have a student counsel when anyone is welcome to join and help, you just have to apply at the beginning of the year. I don't know many details, I've never tried to join. I might just try it during my senior year.
We have LOTS of sports teams! They're spread out seasonally, so you can essentially join a great multitude of teams. Myself I'm part of the basketball, soccer, tennis, badminton, swim, and track teams.
Grades are usually referred to as freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior. I'm a junior, grade 11. Being one of the older grades I don't really feel like younger people look up to you unless you're a peer tutor. Everyone just seems the same. We're all students, 'ya know? If you're wondering a peer tutor is grade 11 or 12 who for one period goes into a grade 9 or 10 class room and helps the teacher. The peer tutor answers questions, helps mark tests, gets to look at a classroom from the outside. Get a feel for what it's like to be a teacher.

I generally wake up at 6am and get ready by 7am. I don't leave the house until 8 because school doesn't start until 8:20am. We attend 2 classes and then have a lunch at 11am until 11:45am. We go to our last 2 classes and end our day at 2:20pm. A lot of people are bussed to school, but there are also a lot of people - myself included, that walk to school.

We have holiday events, just this Halloween we had a custom party in the gym, the ENTIRE school, including the teachers. It was a lot of fun. We have a semi-formal coming up. Which is a dinner and dance to celebrate 1st term ending.

I'd be happy if you share about your high school life, what's different? What's the same? Do you want to know anything is specific? I created this topic because I want to know more about different cultures, so please. SHARE!
5906 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / 38.2500° N, 85.76...
Offline
Posted 11/19/14
It sucks. people only go because law makes them come to school. Same for college. There are clases i go to just because i paid for them. been in classes that i showed up only on test days and gotten A (90%+) for a whole class
4506 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 11/20/14 , edited 11/21/14
It's been a while since I was in school. Where I went to school in the Caribbean we call it secondary school. School starts at 8.30am and finishes at 2.30pm. All schools wear uniforms. Year classes are divided into forms. Usually its around 30 or so per class. You start out in form 1. Five year schools have forms 1-5. Seven year ones have forms 1-6. Some of these are called colleges. Since we don't necessarily live near our schools some could be doing a 2 hour commute and others just a 5 minute walk. I had a 2 hour commute so I got up at 4am just to beat the morning traffic rush. Sometimes I was tired so I was slow leaving home. If I left home just after 6am I'd always be late. At 5am I could get to school as early as 6.30am then I'd do my homework whilst waiting. I never did homework at home. We could apply for free bus passes to travel to school. I only applied in my last year. There isn't a school bus system. There's just the general bus network that sometimes puts on extra buses with a school label attached to it around 3.30pm or sometimes at 7am in the morning. You never know when or where they were sending them so you couldn't rely on them.

You need to sit a national exam at the age of about 11 to determine your secondary school place. It's a streaming process. The top schools pick off the cream of the crop then the general school get the next pick and the rest of the schools get what's left. Those who have failed the exam get sent to special schools prepared for this eventuality. In some areas there really isn't much provision when you've failed. I'm not sure what the education is like for those who're sent to these places. Pressure is on at this exam just aged 11, some get threatened with beatings, some get threatened with being kicked out of their homes, other parents plead with their children, some bribe them or beg the or even pray for them. Some prepare and pay to get their children extra lessons for the exam. Those is good private schools just give their students extra tuition near exam time.

I did well in this exam and got sent to one of the best schools. School populations could be as small as 600 or as large as over a 1000. There are the older grammar type schools like the one I went to which are academically focused. We had a 3 form entry so there were 100 others who started the same year as I did, all split into 3 classes. When we got to 14 they decided to stream us into an A class and two other classes. Other Schools offer both vocational and academical routes. Our school had a choir, table tennis club, football (soccer) club, hockey club and steel pan orchestra. You stay in school until you're 16/17 then you sit CXC exams in your chosen subjects. Again the pressure, threats, pleads, bribes extra lessons etc. Top grades start at 1 (A) and decrease to 2(B), 3(C) etc. Most of the times parents and everyone else just except 1s as passes so tell you you've failed if you don't get this. Parents then try to get you to repeat to get the coveted 1s. My school will accept some repeating if they have passed the exam in the first place so if you've got below a 4 they won't want you there to repeat because they think that's a waste their time. At 17 you can stay on in school to do A level exams. This last 2 years. You could be 19 by the time you leave school depending on when your birthday falls or if you started secondary school at 12 instead of 11. Some even end up there until aged 20. Not all schools have form six. My school was called a college school and did have form 6. Not everyone could be accepted into form 6. You needed to have all 1s in CXC for the school to accept you. I didn't so I would have never been accepted. But others schools would have accepted me. I'd ended in the UK in a 6th form in a school here.

My brother's school had the vocational as well as the academical route. He could chose from mechanics, technical drawing, agricultural science, sports ,etc. Our choices were English, Maths, Biology, Spanish, French, History, Home Economics, Physics, Computing, Geography, Chemistry and Literature. His school included a mini farm with animals, workshops, library, large audio visual rooms, learning kitchens, IT suite, music studios, numerous labs and purpose built sport track and field. We had a few labs, a small IT suite, library little tennis court and some lawns to run around on. My lil sis's school had a football (soccer) club, 4H club, steel pan orchestra, Art club, choir and track team. Bro's school had similar clubs. These days the students at school are all allocated their own individual lab tops to use. In my time we got given book grants because we were supposed to come to school with our own books. I was in the school choir and we won two trophies at two of the inter school competitions we'd entered. I didn't go with them when they went with the school steel orchersta on a trip to Manitoba in Canada. I also didn't go when they had a school trip to Venezuela. I knew I couldn't talk my mother into funding it. Somehow my brother did get to go to his school trip to Venezuela. I did get mother to fund to holiday camp every Easter and summer so I didn't complain too much. I'm a bookworm so had lots of library time.

Holidays are Christmas time, Easter and Summer time. There are some national holidays. They have carnival and although people go awol these days they aren't a national holiday. Halloween is only starting to become popular. When I was at school around that time of the year Diwali , hindu/jain festival of lights was celebrated and everyone joined in no matter what your religion was. Everyone joined in when it was Eid, Easter, Christmas and Pagwa too. Around carnival schools put on fetes, students decide what stalls they'd like to run and tickets are sold to students and the general public for the event. Money raised goes to the schools's ongoing programs.

My school was strict. I went to an all girls school and we had to have our skirts at least 2 inches below the knee. Teachers had measuring tape to check. Hair ornaments had to be black or they'd be confiscated. We had a prefect system, the teachers chose them and allocated 2 to each class. They'd get prefect badges.

After 6th form you could apply to university if you haven't started looking for entry level work already. Some had even gotten married then. Three girls in my class had engagement rings when I left at 16.
8194 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Ontario Canada
Offline
Posted 11/24/14

tkayt wrote:

It's been a while since I was in school. Where I went to school in the Caribbean we call it secondary school. School starts at 8.30am and finishes at 2.30pm. All schools wear uniforms. Year classes are divided into forms. Usually its around 30 or so per class. You start out in form 1. Five year schools have forms 1-5. Seven year ones have forms 1-6. Some of these are called colleges. Since we don't necessarily live near our schools some could be doing a 2 hour commute and others just a 5 minute walk. I had a 2 hour commute so I got up at 4am just to beat the morning traffic rush. Sometimes I was tired so I was slow leaving home. If I left home just after 6am I'd always be late. At 5am I could get to school as early as 6.30am then I'd do my homework whilst waiting. I never did homework at home. We could apply for free bus passes to travel to school. I only applied in my last year. There isn't a school bus system. There's just the general bus network that sometimes puts on extra buses with a school label attached to it around 3.30pm or sometimes at 7am in the morning. You never know when or where they were sending them so you couldn't rely on them.

You need to sit a national exam at the age of about 11 to determine your secondary school place. It's a streaming process. The top schools pick off the cream of the crop then the general school get the next pick and the rest of the schools get what's left. Those who have failed the exam get sent to special schools prepared for this eventuality. In some areas there really isn't much provision when you've failed. I'm not sure what the education is like for those who're sent to these places. Pressure is on at this exam just aged 11, some get threatened with beatings, some get threatened with being kicked out of their homes, other parents plead with their children, some bribe them or beg the or even pray for them. Some prepare and pay to get their children extra lessons for the exam. Those is good private schools just give their students extra tuition near exam time.

I did well in this exam and got sent to one of the best schools. School populations could be as small as 600 or as large as over a 1000. There are the older grammar type schools like the one I went to which are academically focused. We had a 3 form entry so there were 100 others who started the same year as I did, all split into 3 classes. When we got to 14 they decided to stream us into an A class and two other classes. Other Schools offer both vocational and academical routes. Our school had a choir, table tennis club, football (soccer) club, hockey club and steel pan orchestra. You stay in school until you're 16/17 then you sit CXC exams in your chosen subjects. Again the pressure, threats, pleads, bribes extra lessons etc. Top grades start at 1 (A) and decrease to 2(B), 3(C) etc. Most of the times parents and everyone else just except 1s as passes so tell you you've failed if you don't get this. Parents then try to get you to repeat to get the coveted 1s. My school will accept some repeating if they have passed the exam in the first place so if you've got below a 4 they won't want you there to repeat because they think that's a waste their time. At 17 you can stay on in school to do A level exams. This last 2 years. You could be 19 by the time you leave school depending on when your birthday falls or if you started secondary school at 12 instead of 11. Some even end up there until aged 20. Not all schools have form six. My school was called a college school and did have form 6. Not everyone could be accepted into form 6. You needed to have all 1s in CXC for the school to accept you. I didn't so I would have never been accepted. But others schools would have accepted me. I'd ended in the UK in a 6th form in a school here.

My brother's school had the vocational as well as the academical route. He could chose from mechanics, technical drawing, agricultural science, sports ,etc. Our choices were English, Maths, Biology, Spanish, French, History, Home Economics, Physics, Computing, Geography, Chemistry and Literature. His school included a mini farm with animals, workshops, library, large audio visual rooms, learning kitchens, IT suite, music studios, numerous labs and purpose built sport track and field. We had a few labs, a small IT suite, library little tennis court and some lawns to run around on. My lil sis's school had a football (soccer) club, 4H club, steel pan orchestra, Art club, choir and track team. Bro's school had similar clubs. These days the students at school are all allocated their own individual lab tops to use. In my time we got given book grants because we were supposed to come to school with our own books. I was in the school choir and we won two trophies at two of the inter school competitions we'd entered. I didn't go with them when they went with the school steel orchersta on a trip to Manitoba in Canada. I also didn't go when they had a school trip to Venezuela. I knew I couldn't talk my mother into funding it. Somehow my brother did get to go to his school trip to Venezuela. I did get mother to fund to holiday camp every Easter and summer so I didn't complain too much. I'm a bookworm so had lots of library time.

Holidays are Christmas time, Easter and Summer time. There are some national holidays. They have carnival and although people go awol these days they aren't a national holiday. Halloween is only starting to become popular. When I was at school around that time of the year Diwali , hindu/jain festival of lights was celebrated and everyone joined in no matter what your religion was. Everyone joined in when it was Eid, Easter, Christmas and Pagwa too. Around carnival schools put on fetes, students decide what stalls they'd like to run and tickets are sold to students and the general public for the event. Money raised goes to the schools's ongoing programs.

My school was strict. I went to an all girls school and we had to have our skirts at least 2 inches below the knee. Teachers had measuring tape to check. Hair ornaments had to be black or they'd be confiscated. We had a prefect system, the teachers chose them and allocated 2 to each class. They'd get prefect badges.

After 6th form you could apply to university if you haven't started looking for entry level work already. Some had even gotten married then. Three girls in my class had engagement rings when I left at 16.


Wow! Thank you SO much for sharing! That's actually extremely interesting to me.

We don't have entrance exams for high school, but we do for college/university.

As for the dress codes, I find it a little silly, but I think I'd have liked to go to a school with uniforms. Our dress code is quite mild. We aren't allowed to wear hats in doors, unless is a religious hat. If shirts are sleeveless the strap has to be thicker than your index and middle fingers together. Shorts/skirts have to be the same length or longer than your fingertips reach on your legs when you're standing straight up. You aren't allowed to wear anything depicting violence or drugs/alcohol.

I can really respect you for being able to wake up that early to commune! I live only 10 minutes away from my school on foot, so I walk everyday. Although, I'm quite lethargic in the mornings so I'm usually late! I've got the track record of a delinquent's attendance, but I maintain myself in the top 5 of my grade academically.

Academically, there are 3 different course difficulties offered at my school. The hardest, Academic. The middle, Applied. Also the 3rd, which is for those with special needs. You pick whether you want to be in academic or applied at the end of your grade 8 year. If you find your choice of academic to be too hard, you can go down to applied, similarly, if applied is too easy, you can go to academic. Generally academic or applied is chosen because you either want to go to university or college. If you want to attend university, you have to take academic, where as if you want to go to college you can take academic if you wish, but only applied is required.

Thanks again for answering!

4506 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 11/26/14

TheTruBlu


Wow! Thank you SO much for sharing! That's actually extremely interesting to me.

We don't have entrance exams for high school, but we do for college/university.

As for the dress codes, I find it a little silly, but I think I'd have liked to go to a school with uniforms. Our dress code is quite mild. We aren't allowed to wear hats in doors, unless is a religious hat. If shirts are sleeveless the strap has to be thicker than your index and middle fingers together. Shorts/skirts have to be the same length or longer than your fingertips reach on your legs when you're standing straight up. You aren't allowed to wear anything depicting violence or drugs/alcohol.

I can really respect you for being able to wake up that early to commune! I live only 10 minutes away from my school on foot, so I walk everyday. Although, I'm quite lethargic in the mornings so I'm usually late! I've got the track record of a delinquent's attendance, but I maintain myself in the top 5 of my grade academically.

Academically, there are 3 different course difficulties offered at my school. The hardest, Academic. The middle, Applied. Also the 3rd, which is for those with special needs. You pick whether you want to be in academic or applied at the end of your grade 8 year. If you find your choice of academic to be too hard, you can go down to applied, similarly, if applied is too easy, you can go to academic. Generally academic or applied is chosen because you either want to go to university or college. If you want to attend university, you have to take academic, where as if you want to go to college you can take academic if you wish, but only applied is required.

Thanks again for answering!



You're welcome.

We used to joke that soon they'd start demanding we wear uniform undies and check up on this as well. There was a late book you were supposed to sign when you were late. I however have never set eyes on that book throughout my years in that school even though I was late many times. Special education needs was and still is lacking. There are some schools for those who're deaf or blind or with some physical disabilities. They're mainly charity run and don't necessarily follow the national curriculum. Some are private and in some areas its mostly a daycare centre. They haven't allocated the staff or funds to properly assess children with learning or other disabilities. Some schools don't even have guidance counsellors or school may have to share. The ratio seems to be 1 person for 1000 children. We had one girl in a wheelchair and that was very rare to see that. My school didn't have a guidance counsellor or mentor. My bro's school did have one and so did big sis's school. Some schools especially primary schools used to punish you by spanking but thankfully they finally got rid of that.

When it comes to the CXC exams there's two levels, general and basic. If you struggle with general you can get downgraded to basic but teachers do say that the qualification does end up being useless when it come to applying for university and many jobs. A basic 1 is equivalent to a 3 in general. In the UK they go for quantity and try to get you sit as many as 10-12 subjects at a time. We were told quality is better so they had us sit 6 -8 subjects with a focus on getting the 1s (A).
You must be logged in to post.