First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
How does anime get advertised internationally?
8267 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / Satellite Beach, FL
Offline
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/17/14
Hey everyone:

I'm currently writing an international marketing research paper on this topic and was wondering what everyone's opinions were, and if anyone wanted to have a conversation about this. So far in my research, I have come to the conclusion that the Japanese publishers have their distributors (like Crunchyroll) do their international marketing for them. But this led me to another question: How do the distributors market anime on an international scale?
I've been writing that distributors such as Crunchyroll focus on their target markets by advertising at specialized events and through online sources. But within a distributor, how do the individual anime titles get advertised? Is it solely through weekly/monthly newsletters or what? Or if there is a marketing plan set by the Japanese publishers where they tell their distributors how they want their titles to be advertised?

This may be a...stupid question (because I honestly haven't done much research on this), but how is anime marketed and distributed locally in Japan?

I've been doing quite a bit of research on this, and the more I research, the more curious I am about it.
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/18/14
Word of mouth.
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/18/14
basic standpoint would be to look at anime as having established a large fan base and work from there on...

i'd say word of mouth.

cr would use; various media, phasing

updates... newsletters seem old fashioned but pretty sure you can find some compressed into bite sizes..e.g. use of apps.

locally; probably through music.. might be wrong but i'd think they sometimes go hand in hand.

questions to ask when considering where they want their anime to go; why here? why there? risk?

sometimes; scandals, use of famous artists, manga... so anticipation is already intact.



20213 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / The Heroes Associ...
Offline
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/18/14
Anime producers don't target foreign audiences. They have legitimately only JUST started targeting western audiences, the most noticable one being Space Dandy.

Anime has been and is still a niche market in the west; and like most niche markets, its often advertised via internet sites dedicated to that niche market, or word of mouth.

However, in japan, new titles are often advertised via TV, news articles and weekly otaku magazines. There are few of these magazines that do indeed make it over to the west, (i don't have the sources on hand atm)


This topic would be very hard, because you can only really talk about the few western anime news sites, such as Anime News Network, Crunchyroll and Funimation.

I would suggest, maybe also pointing out how toonami revolutionized the entire anime industry in the sense it brought alot of anime to the west and really created a strong fan base in the western world. You can say that, Toonami itself, works as a third party advertiser, by introducing foreign people to the Japanese animation industry through dubbed anime.

You can also say that Sites like crunchyroll that provide a news section contribute to a large portion of online advertisements which would otherwise never be seen by westerners.

I would have given more points, but my brain is like dead atm, since i just finished a double shift at work.

I hope at-least something i said helped out.

Cheers! Good luck.
19871 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / Chicago,IL
Offline
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/17/14
They don't.
Posted 11/16/14 , edited 11/18/14
They have life-size posters and anime magazines and anime cons.

So jealous of Japanese anime fans, they get more stuffs than international fans will ever get to see.
Posted 11/17/14 , edited 11/18/14
You guys are insane if you think they don't.

Toonami? Anime Network? There's anime and manga stores near me. The fact CrunchyRoll is based in SF is proof enough, and they advertise internationally.
8267 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / Satellite Beach, FL
Offline
Posted 11/17/14 , edited 11/18/14
Thank you so much everyone!

Everyone's comments helped straighten my head again (as I go to start writing some more). And yes, this is a really hard paper, especially when I could have chosen something like Coke or Starbucks...heck, even McDonnalds. But I'll be glad once this paper is over, and hopefully satisfied with it. Even though it's hard, it's very interesting.

Applestash: Yes, word of mouth is how I heard of some funny series that I wouldn't have heard of otherwise. This makes me think that social networking is very important in marketing a particular series.

In response to AzazelOfNexium: Lol that's funny because I have yet to watch SD. But I'll have to look into it since I could possibly use it as an example. Yes, most of my research uses western sources. Although I cried when I found TV TOKYO's 2008 annual report in English because it was so detailed, it was amazing. Sadly, the 2014 report isn't translated. Toonami is BRILLIANT! I have no idea how I failed to think about my childhood and remember that it was toonami that got me into anime. Talk about a real game-changer. And no worries! It was like 2am when I posted, so I'm pretty sure my mind wasn't all there either.

Severticas, I think you're right on point. There's not a big fan base for anime and they have to market to their niche. That's interesting when you say music because Miku was featured on Letterman a while back. I'll have to look into it. Wasn't RWBY also partly promoted with music? (Not that I jam out every time I hear a RWBY song on Pandora.......)

MrChamploo: Do you think the producers should market internationally?

GayAsianBoy: I agree, as a fan, I'm pretty jealous of how accessible everything is! I think I read something about marketing in Japan doesn't necessarily include the story-line because just a picture of a Moe character will draw just as much attention to the series. Whereas in western culture (at least the US), the story-line is really important. I could be really wrong on that. I need to do some more research on it.

AiYumega: I think those are more of the distributors marketing overseas. I do agree though, crunchyroll does an insane amount of global marketing for such a small/new company. I would be curious to know how crunchyroll entered foreign markets. Like, was it mostly through word of mouth within the anime community? And you're so lucky you live next to such stores! I live in the land of old people. (bad joke, but it's mostly true.)
Posted 11/18/14 , edited 11/22/14
I got to know about Crunchyroll via YouTube.. At the time, I was watching anime mainly on there and the one i was into was Bleach. Soon enough, aploads were being taken down, there was a huge shakeup and the funny thing is that, i'd search for an anime and they'd make it look like an episode was on Youtube... it would hve 10mins assigned and a thumbnail that looked to be from the actual episode so you'd think it's legid.

You'd click on it and it would most likely tell you about some site or to follow some link.. these wre being uploaded as aggressively as they were being taken down.

there were several sites but i guess crunchyroll eventually won people over with how it catered to its community... good forums, chat, music on profiles... all that kept people and it was like the facebook thing all over again. later on, they worked on becoming reliable and other things that got the site the kind of attention it needed...e.g. investment, asian ent etc...

this is how i remember it going down
2181 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 11/21/14 , edited 11/22/14
OTAKU UNMASKED: THE LIFE, DEATH AND REBIRTH OF JAPAN’S POP CULTURE
http://www.japansociety.org/page/multimedia/articles/otaku_unmasked

I think u may find Dai Saito's comments in this interview especially illuminating. Also, try using the keywords "marketing anime" to search http://www.japansociety.org/.

To market anime in Japan, they use tv commercials, print media, special events - pretty much every kind of advertising you can think of. But that's because in Japan, anime is a massive multi-billion dollar industry that is considered to be part of their national identity; if you don't believe that last bit, just search around google for instances where anime has been discussed in the National Diet (which is something like Congress in America).

To market anime in other countries outside of Japan, they use the same methods, only on a much MUCH smaller scale. They use the data gathered from streaming anime sites like CR to analyze market trends - which, by and large, are vastly different from anime fans inside of Japan. Which is why, for example, it took so long for SAO 2 to get made; the 1st season of SAO did horribly within Japan, so it wasn't until they saw the results of the BD/DVD sales from overseas that it became apparent to them where their real audience was. Proof of this can be found in the fact that they did a multi-state SAO 2 tour in the US - but they didn't do it in Japan.

18345 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Argentina
Offline
Posted 11/22/14 , edited 11/22/14

shukujo wrote:

OTAKU UNMASKED: THE LIFE, DEATH AND REBIRTH OF JAPAN’S POP CULTURE
http://www.japansociety.org/page/multimedia/articles/otaku_unmasked

I think u may find Dai Saito's comments in this interview especially illuminating. Also, try using the keywords "marketing anime" to search http://www.japansociety.org/.

To market anime in Japan, they use tv commercials, print media, special events - pretty much every kind of advertising you can think of. But that's because in Japan, anime is a massive multi-billion dollar industry that is considered to be part of their national identity; if you don't believe that last bit, just search around google for instances where anime has been discussed in the National Diet (which is something like Congress in America).

To market anime in other countries outside of Japan, they use the same methods, only on a much MUCH smaller scale. They use the data gathered from streaming anime sites like CR to analyze market trends - which, by and large, are vastly different from anime fans inside of Japan. Which is why, for example, it took so long for SAO 2 to get made; the 1st season of SAO did horribly within Japan, so it wasn't until they saw the results of the BD/DVD sales from overseas that it became apparent to them where their real audience was. Proof of this can be found in the fact that they did a multi-state SAO 2 tour in the US - but they didn't do it in Japan.



That it is not true. SAO is very popular within Japan and the first season had good sales there, look:

http://www.reddit.com/r/anime/comments/1eil4z/2012_topselling_tv_anime_average_sales_rankings/

Furthermore, the SAO light novels are very popular too:

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2012-12-02/top-selling-light-novels-in-japan-by-series/2012

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2013-12-01/top-selling-light-novels-in-japan-by-series/2013

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2014-06-03/top-selling-light-novels-in-japan-by-series-2014/.75184
8267 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / Satellite Beach, FL
Offline
Posted 11/22/14 , edited 11/22/14
Severticas: I remember that! That's why I stopped watching anime via YouTube as well. However, I went to animecrazy/animefreak because that's the links I followed. lol Although I left to crunchyroll after a friend showed me how much better the quality and streaming was. I just with they had as many drama titles as they do anime. But anyways, thank you for reminding me about the use of forums because I totally added that to my "word of mouth" advertising section for my paper. It's funny how you can overlook a lot of things.

Shukujo: I found that site to be very helpful! There's even a couple of articles on the cross-cultural marketplace! Articles are a blessing to come by when writing a paper on a subject that mostly exists through networking between fans.....or all of the information is in a different language. I'm not sure about SAO, but I know other sources that are more popular in other regions. Like how Ace of Diamond is more popular in Latin America than it is in the US. It makes sense culturally.

I had also responded to an older forum on a different site because some people had the same question that I had, and I actually got a good response. "My suggestion would be to study what Aniplex is doing. They are absolute masters of hype marketing, micromanaging incentive buying around key time frames in a products lifespan, special package deals and pricing, and just sheer blanket advertising that can get people excited around and interested in an anime product very fast and on an international level. Their advertising/marketing model has made them pretty much the most successful and dominant publisher in anime for something like the last 7-8 years with tons of commercial hits as a result, many of which are critical flops mind you but have made their bank nonetheless by being popular, extremely well promoted, and by getting people to buy the product at the crucial times.

I can't imagine anyone else spends anywhere near as much as they do when it comes to advertising anime. Of course a lot of this has to do with them having direct connections and ties to some very popular staffers the most prominent of which would be Gen Urobuchi who they tend to lean on hard as a marketing device and incentive, but reliance on key human resources most companies probably don't have still doesn't mean you can't study how they go about their promotions for big titles with the whole blanket advertising approach and weekly PV commercials and 30 minute TV specials rented out just to promote upcoming anime (Aldnoah.Zero, Irregular at Magic High School are examples of this) to keep interested parties pumped up about seeing their favorite characters from a hit Light Novel in animation or the latest Urobuchi scripted product for example."

And then I found a good article that explained why Aniplex is marketing directly towards US buyers here: http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2010-04-16/aniplex-america-sells-gurren-lagann-movie-dvds-in-july
To be honest, I think they're the only publishers to market their series directly on such a wide scale.
20135 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
37 / M / Small Wooded town...
Offline
Posted 12/8/14 , edited 12/8/14
In the past not to far back.. Anime was leaked onto the internet.. and even before that people who traveled to japan would bring back anime and pirate it by making copies and passing it around to friends for free.

But this did not hurt the industry like most people would think, instead this grew crowds that expanded the market for anime. Soon corporations sprang up and wanted to monopolize this.. and so groups like Toonami sprang up and started buying the rights to anime. (in a way this help spread anime as well, but it also hurt anime, because they do no equally spread all forms of anime, only that witch they think will sell and produce revenue through the sale of products.) Hence bandwagon and over hyped anime. leaving lesser known yet better anime unseen out side of japan.
476 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Netherlands
Offline
Posted 12/10/14 , edited 12/10/14
Never saw advertisements outside of groups or anything here.. So Mouth to Mouth here
38304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 12/10/14 , edited 12/10/14
The process is very complicated, but long of it short Japanese anime/manga publishers and distributors set up a dense network of buoys with megaphones affixed to them throughout the world's oceans and seas. This was a marked improvement from the previous method, which was to place notes about the latest anime titles in large bottles and send them floating out to sea. The industry standard seems to be on its way to changing yet again, however, as carrier pigeons have recently become a very popular subject among Japanese anime/manga publisher/distributors' marketing analysts. The basic idea seems to be to emulate the Pony Express, but with pigeons.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.