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Post Reply How does anime get advertised internationally?
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25 / F / Satellite Beach, FL
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Posted 12/16/14

BlueOni wrote:

The process is very complicated, but long of it short Japanese anime/manga publishers and distributors set up a dense network of buoys with megaphones affixed to them throughout the world's oceans and seas. This was a marked improvement from the previous method, which was to place notes about the latest anime titles in large bottles and send them floating out to sea. The industry standard seems to be on its way to changing yet again, however, as carrier pigeons have recently become a very popular subject among Japanese anime/manga publisher/distributors' marketing analysts. The basic idea seems to be to emulate the Pony Express, but with pigeons.


LOL That's actually really creatively accurate
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Posted 12/18/14 , edited 12/18/14
Not much, I think.
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Posted 12/18/14

PruBenAzul wrote:

Hey everyone:

I'm currently writing an international marketing research paper on this topic and was wondering what everyone's opinions were, and if anyone wanted to have a conversation about this. So far in my research, I have come to the conclusion that the Japanese publishers have their distributors (like Crunchyroll) do their international marketing for them. But this led me to another question: How do the distributors market anime on an international scale?
I've been writing that distributors such as Crunchyroll focus on their target markets by advertising at specialized events and through online sources. But within a distributor, how do the individual anime titles get advertised? Is it solely through weekly/monthly newsletters or what? Or if there is a marketing plan set by the Japanese publishers where they tell their distributors how they want their titles to be advertised?

This may be a...stupid question (because I honestly haven't done much research on this), but how is anime marketed and distributed locally in Japan?

I've been doing quite a bit of research on this, and the more I research, the more curious I am about it.


I'd say exposure in the west is the best marketing. Anime that was introduced to America long ago when the industry was a baby - Astro Boy, Speed Racer, Gundam '79, and so on - eventually touched the American industry enough to start embracing more anime. Manag also played a significant role, but that's another story for an expert to explore. Back to the subject, you have to remember that for many generations, anime and any other form of media did not have merchandising; you either watched it on TV or in the theaters and that was it, at least until the invention of the VCR which allowed middle class families to afford buying media and even then, anime wasn't popular enough to be sold on VCR until later.

I would say the 90s is when all of this changed because of two revolutionary things: Toonami and 4Kids. Yes, 4Kids. I am not even joking. Much of the exposure that the current generation received that got us into anime was due to the fact that shows like Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh were on the air, which gave us the curiosity to explore anime when we were older. As for the teens and young adults of the 90s (the millennials) as well as a few daring young kids, if you stayed up late enough, they had Toonami, which held the more sophisticated classics (Cowboy Bebop, Neon Genesis Evangelion, etc) as well as the staple Shonen (Dragon Ball Z, One Piece, Bleach, etc) and even the Magical Girl genre (Sailor Moon) that exposed the older millenials to begin researching and watching anime.

4Kids and Toonami are the reason, and are really the marketing, that allowed dubbing companies to come into existence, and these established dubbing companies began to advertise to curious anime fans, who began researching more anime after watching Toonami (and later, the 4Kids Generation when the industry was more established), especially after Toonami was canceled in 2004.

The most important year to note about the beginning of mass marketing from the anime industry to the consumer would be 2007, considered the greatest year in anime (for titles such as Code Geass, Gurren Lagann, Naruto: Shippuden, Baccano!, etc) and the beginning of the Golden Age of Anime we live in now. This year jump-started a lot of dubbing companies with a lot of great titles and Crunchyroll, which only had began in 2006, could build its career (notably with getting permission to stream Naruto: Shippuden) and would help usher in the age of streaming that would come years later.

The popularity of Anime conventions also began to increase and contributed to marketing hugely, especially as dubbing companies began to succeed, due to people's interest in industry panels, which market new anime that dubbing companies plan on releasing new, translated material. As Anime Expo notably grew, people internationally would travel in to see the largest Anime convention in North America, which allowed for more funding and allows the convention to continually grow, which in turn continues to promote anime on a large scale.

Once streaming had been established and companies such as Crunchyroll were given the rights to give subbed content overseas an hour after release on Japanese television, this ultimately allowed for mainstream marketing in Japan to directly impact foreign countries such as the U.S. since there is no longer a delay in needing a company to sub the anime and then need to release a DVD (which then takes even longer if the company wants to create a dub to be released with the sub). The anime fan-base has long since been established and anime content has now spread to regular media streaming cites such as Hulu and Netflix, allowing a niche industry to successfully impact people with a broader range of exposure. Streaming also makes it so that international viewers are more perceptive of the Japanese market; notably, having anime seasons (The fall season, the winter season, etc that allows a ton of new anime to premier at once like in the Japanese market) and the ability and willingness to do research on new releases (especially with the internet aiding them).

And now, we have reached the present day. Ultimately, I would say without exposure through Toonami and 4Kids in the 90s, there would be no anime industry in the U.S., but now major dubbing companies and streaming sites carry that responsibility for future generations, as well as the anime fans of old who pass down their wisdom to the next generation.
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Posted 12/19/14
I can't say that I've ever seen any ads for DVDs or box sets or anything like that over the air, unless the stuff advertised can be easily sold to kids (Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, etc). Every time I check ANN though, especially around this time of year, there are ads on the site promoting holiday sales hosted by companies like FUNimation, Sentai, Viz, etc. Most people who buy anime/manga are pretty Internet savvy, so lots of advertisements are done over the web. I remember the ad that got me into anime many years ago was an internet advertisement good 'ol Toonami Jetstream made me watch before playing a video I wanted to see.

I think a large amount of international advertising is done through word of mouth. Cons are especially great for this.

One interesting note about advertising within anime is that if a real life product is depicted in the show (like the trading cards in Yu-Gi-Oh), the cards themselves cannot be perfect replicas of their real-life counterparts. If the toys depicted in the TV show were exactly like the actual products, the broadcasting network would legally have to treat those episodes as commercials. This is why in the old Yu-Gi-Oh episodes if you look carefully at the monster cards, the cards only depict the monster's image and nothing else.

Speaking of ANN, I think there is a column somewhere on the site that would be great for this. If I were to guess, OPs project is probably over since the fall semester has ended for most people, but the column has lots of interesting information about the industry and how it is managed overseas. The author worked in the industry for a long time and has lots of cool stories.

Link below...

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2014-12-12/.82036

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Posted 12/19/14
I don't actually see any anime advertising on TV here...
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Posted 2/9/15

Nightblade370 wrote:


PruBenAzul wrote:

Hey everyone:

I'm currently writing an international marketing research paper on this topic and was wondering what everyone's opinions were, and if anyone wanted to have a conversation about this. So far in my research, I have come to the conclusion that the Japanese publishers have their distributors (like Crunchyroll) do their international marketing for them. But this led me to another question: How do the distributors market anime on an international scale?
I've been writing that distributors such as Crunchyroll focus on their target markets by advertising at specialized events and through online sources. But within a distributor, how do the individual anime titles get advertised? Is it solely through weekly/monthly newsletters or what? Or if there is a marketing plan set by the Japanese publishers where they tell their distributors how they want their titles to be advertised?

This may be a...stupid question (because I honestly haven't done much research on this), but how is anime marketed and distributed locally in Japan?

I've been doing quite a bit of research on this, and the more I research, the more curious I am about it.



And now, we have reached the present day. Ultimately, I would say without exposure through Toonami and 4Kids in the 90s, there would be no anime industry in the U.S., but now major dubbing companies and streaming sites carry that responsibility for future generations, as well as the anime fans of old who pass down their wisdom to the next generation.



I am so sorry I responded so late to this! I could have sworn I did, but ahhhhh.
Yes, I completely agree. Looking back at my childhood, I didn't even know that the shows I was watching were anime. It wasn't until I was old enough to buy the DVDs that I learned about anime. And that was only because I was looking for InuYasha and couldn't find it, so I asked one of the store employees for her help. As it turned out, she was a huge anime fan and introduced me to a lot of other titles along with learning that a lot of shows that I watched on 4kids and Toonami/Adult Swim, were anime titles.

I'm interested to see how the industry grows in the west. I see a lot of potential in marketing since a lot of it is by word of mouth. It makes sense that Crunchyroll will advertise and market the titles that they have the rights to, but there's a lot of other shows out there that crunchyroll doesn't have. Unless you're really watching the new releases in Japan and scouting for the subs, a lot of titles can go unnoticed.
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Posted 2/9/15

RebonackTheFist wrote:

I can't say that I've ever seen any ads for DVDs or box sets or anything like that over the air, unless the stuff advertised can be easily sold to kids (Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, etc). Every time I check ANN though, especially around this time of year, there are ads on the site promoting holiday sales hosted by companies like FUNimation, Sentai, Viz, etc. Most people who buy anime/manga are pretty Internet savvy, so lots of advertisements are done over the web. I remember the ad that got me into anime many years ago was an internet advertisement good 'ol Toonami Jetstream made me watch before playing a video I wanted to see.

I think a large amount of international advertising is done through word of mouth. Cons are especially great for this.

One interesting note about advertising within anime is that if a real life product is depicted in the show (like the trading cards in Yu-Gi-Oh), the cards themselves cannot be perfect replicas of their real-life counterparts. If the toys depicted in the TV show were exactly like the actual products, the broadcasting network would legally have to treat those episodes as commercials. This is why in the old Yu-Gi-Oh episodes if you look carefully at the monster cards, the cards only depict the monster's image and nothing else.

Speaking of ANN, I think there is a column somewhere on the site that would be great for this. If I were to guess, OPs project is probably over since the fall semester has ended for most people, but the column has lots of interesting information about the industry and how it is managed overseas. The author worked in the industry for a long time and has lots of cool stories.

Link below...

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2014-12-12/.82036



This was a very interesting article. I found the answer to the overprinting issue to be especially interesting. It makes sense from a business standpoint of the producers being wholesale and their relationship with the retailers. Every now and again I'll go into the "anime" section in Best Buy just to disappoint myself. There's not a lot of retailers that hold a good selection when it comes to anime. I honestly think that the internet is what drives the anime sales when it comes to physical merchandise.
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Posted 2/9/15
In the UK anime is not advertised at all. You can go into somewhere like HMV and there will be anime DVDs for sale but companies don't actively go out of their way to advertise anime here. Most stuff I've seen is just through social media or random websites, not to mention youtube.
Posted 4/3/15

BlackStarLine wrote:

In the UK anime is not advertised at all. You can go into somewhere like HMV and there will be anime DVDs for sale but companies don't actively go out of their way to advertise anime here. Most stuff I've seen is just through social media or random websites, not to mention youtube.


I know, right?
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Posted 4/3/15
Mexico --> no advertising at all, we used to have back when Toonami was on air, nowadays, we dont have animes to broadcast, just Dragon Ball, Pokemon and I think thats it

we dont see anime advertising on TV, yet theres advertising on FB and Twitter for annual anime movies brought by the Konnichiwa Fest, where they bring movies like Gintama, Naruto, Madoka, Anohana, etc...

sad isnt it?
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Posted 4/3/15 , edited 4/3/15

PruBenAzul wrote:

Hey everyone:

I'm currently writing an international marketing research paper on this topic and was wondering what everyone's opinions were, and if anyone wanted to have a conversation about this. So far in my research, I have come to the conclusion that the Japanese publishers have their distributors (like Crunchyroll) do their international marketing for them. But this led me to another question: How do the distributors market anime on an international scale?
I've been writing that distributors such as Crunchyroll focus on their target markets by advertising at specialized events and through online sources. But within a distributor, how do the individual anime titles get advertised? Is it solely through weekly/monthly newsletters or what? Or if there is a marketing plan set by the Japanese publishers where they tell their distributors how they want their titles to be advertised?

This may be a...stupid question (because I honestly haven't done much research on this), but how is anime marketed and distributed locally in Japan?

I've been doing quite a bit of research on this, and the more I research, the more curious I am about it.


Outside of Cartoon Network, I have not seen a single commercial about anime or cartoons anywhere. Not one. Not in Florida, not in Philadelphia PA, not in Washington D.C., not in Puerto Rico.

In short, anime is not advertised very well in the United States, East Coast. Perhaps if someone went to a gaming store, but not in any of the general venues.

There simply doesn't seem to be a concerted effort for it.

Other things I don't see advertised anywhere:
Comics
Tabletop games of any kind.

On the other hand, I see video games advertised everywhere.
Pills and drugs

Shoes
Clothes!
And beauty supplies (grins)


Santera
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Posted 4/3/15

shukujo wrote:To market anime in other countries outside of Japan, they use the same methods, only on a much MUCH smaller scale. They use the data gathered from streaming anime sites like CR to analyze market trends - which, by and large, are vastly different from anime fans inside of Japan. Which is why, for example, it took so long for SAO 2 to get made; the 1st season of SAO did horribly within Japan, so it wasn't until they saw the results of the BD/DVD sales from overseas that it became apparent to them where their real audience was. Proof of this can be found in the fact that they did a multi-state SAO 2 tour in the US - but they didn't do it in Japan.


Wut?

Mate, SAO original volume 1 debuted at ~30k, and even the last volume(volume 9) from the less performing second arc reached ~24k copies, and all the volumes featured at or near the top of the charts. And that was just for blurays at debut, dvd and long-tail sales excluded. SAO II has actually been performing worse in comparison. You may need to check your sources, as they're definitely wrong if they claim SAO performed horribly in Japan...
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