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How do you piano?
joeedh 
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Posted 12/3/14
Normally the rhythm is the same for both hands (or least, the beat is), but there are times when they differ. In that case, I think it's better to start out really really slow, but practice both hands at once. Not much point practicing them separately in this (rare) case.
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Posted 12/3/14

BLACKOUTMK2 wrote:

I believe those are arpeggios. Arpeggios are chords but played upwards, rather than pressing all the notes at the same time. You have to practice playing really slow at first, and make sure you can confidently play an arpeggio on its own first, then the melody before putting them both together. Ultimately though, once you've learned that, it does indeed take practice, just knowing how to play a melody and an arpeggio isn't enough to be able to separate both in your mind at once. I thought it was impossible but it comes to you with practice. Trust me you're not alone, it's one of the first big things many pianists struggle to get their heads around, but persevere and you shall prevail. Maybe looking up some videos with visuals will help, but yes, definitely start slow, don't try and play full speed right off the bat.


Well it doesn't have to be upwards. It's either ascending or descending. Broken chords really, played like that.
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Posted 12/3/14

GrateSaiyaman wrote:


potentsativa wrote:

I am perplexed on how people can keep 2 seperate rhythms while playing Am I the only one? anyone have any tips on how to do it or should I just keep on practicing?


Buy a metronome and keep practicing.....



Yep! They have a bunch of metronome apps for free, though!
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Posted 12/3/14
I've been playing piano since I was 6 years old. I didn't really start to actively practice on my own till I was 13 though. So I tell people I've only played for 5 years.

In that time I've learned that humans are quite terrible at multitasking and the best we can do is fake it. As many here have said, practice is how you learn to have independence with your hands. But to a certain extent, experience and variety are just as important, though the only way to gain these are through practice. Familiarize yourself with musical patterns until you no longer think of the two separate rhythms as separate, but as one whole. That way you'll only have to think about one thing at a time.

but if it's any consolation, most rhythms are based on the meter, so you'll typically the rhythms are never unrelated.

If you persist, eventually you'll get to the point where one hand is playing two separate melodies and rhythms at once. Look into fugues and especially Bach's contrapuntal keyboard works to see what I mean.


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Posted 12/3/14
agreed haha, i was 4 when i started
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Posted 12/4/14

ErikoDesu wrote:


BLACKOUTMK2 wrote:

I believe those are arpeggios. Arpeggios are chords but played upwards, rather than pressing all the notes at the same time. You have to practice playing really slow at first, and make sure you can confidently play an arpeggio on its own first, then the melody before putting them both together. Ultimately though, once you've learned that, it does indeed take practice, just knowing how to play a melody and an arpeggio isn't enough to be able to separate both in your mind at once. I thought it was impossible but it comes to you with practice. Trust me you're not alone, it's one of the first big things many pianists struggle to get their heads around, but persevere and you shall prevail. Maybe looking up some videos with visuals will help, but yes, definitely start slow, don't try and play full speed right off the bat.


Well it doesn't have to be upwards. It's either ascending or descending. Broken chords really, played like that.


Consider it corrected.
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Posted 12/5/14
It's only hard when you think of your two hands playing two different things.
Well, in a literal sense, yes, they're playing two different things, but you're still playing one specific song.

In my line of work, perfect practice makes perfect, so all you have to do is to keep at it.

Everyone's different, but what helped me learn piano was lining up each note with the finger used to play it according to the sheet of music. Mainly for facilitated memorization.
A friend of mine, and I can guarantee that she knows what she's doing since she's been a professional pianist for over a decade, utilizes what she calls 4-16 and 8-32 exercises. She also had a problem with "playing two different things with each hand."

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Posted 12/5/14 , edited 12/5/14
Just do it slowly. There's no rush to learn it. Don't be mad when you don't get it immediately. Don't be mad when it takes you so long. There's nothing wrong with that.

Just take it one note at a time.

I tend to ignore rhythm while learning two hands at the same time. I just make sure that if both hands play a note at the same time, that they are played at the same time. And then I play the next note. Once I become familiar with the order of the notes, I then think about the rhythm they are played in. And then eventually I can play it faster, and faster, and faster, until eventually... I've got it.

Oh - and you don't have to take it slow. It's more important to do it one note(s) at a time. Sometimes you'll be able to play three notes quickly in succession, and other times it will take an entire minute to play three notes (especially with sheet music).
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Posted 12/6/14
how do you guitar?
Posted 12/6/14 , edited 12/6/14
piano do you
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