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漢和名手
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Posted 1/28/15
I don't quite get everything in that ad, but I think it's something like....

Saturday-Monday Three days
On January 24-26
?Daily thanks/appreciation-- something with prices Nikoniko Day
All frozen food 40% off All ice cream 20% off
** Meat and fish not eligible for discount

Tons of other things specially priced on those days as well

Too bad the sale is over! I'm guessing ni ko is like 2-5, or ni-go. Niku (meat) might go better on the 29th (ni-ku),
先生
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Posted 1/29/15
That makes sense Ditto-san! I know what miso is but I'm not really familiar with miso. The only time I've ever had miso was a Trader Joe's version of white miso and I tried al little of it, I liked it but it was so very salty! I've also seen red miso, do you know the difference between red and white miso? I know that miso is used in soups, but what else can you use it in?

Sushi-san thank you for the translation of the ad! (I know it looked like a totally good sale! ) The one thing in the ad I didn't understand was ニコニコ day referred to? Like "Smile day"? Because n Japanese internet slang 2525 means "smiling"!

Here's a list of Japanese internet slang if anyone's interested: http://ofurotaimu.dreamwidth.org/6378.html
漢和名手
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Posted 1/29/15
Indeed, "Nikoniko" Day probably is "Smile Day," though as far as I know, it's just made up-- not an "official" holiday of any sort. The 25th of any month could conceivably be Nikoniko Day. I've kind of always thought the darker the miso, the more fermented it was, and the stronger the flavor. I've never done it, but I've heard of using miso in other sauces, and also wrapping fish (or perhaps other things as well) in it to kind of pickle or cure the meat.
百芸
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Posted 1/29/15
Actually there are a lot of different kinds of miso. First thing to know is: what is miso? In general it is a fermented paste made from soybeans, salt, and sometimes other grains like rice and barley. The 3 main types that you'll find are white, yellow, and red.

White is made by fermenting soy beans with a lot of rice. That's why it is very light in color and taste. I think this or yellow miso is what is most often used in miso soup. BTW, real miso soup is not vegan. It uses a fish stock.

Yellow miso is made with more soy beans and less rice, or barley.

Red miso is aged after it has been fermented. That can be for a year or more. There are even varieties like hatcho miso that is aged in cider barrels.

Miso is used in a lot of recipes, especially as a base. Basically, the darker the color the more rich the flavor. And you want to use the darker colors for more flavorful meals. Of course, since miso can be pretty salty, you have to watch how much you use it. Red miso is great for making soups, especially ramen. It can be used in curries. And it can be used in dipping sauces.
学生
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Posted 1/30/15
Ok, so I've been learning Japanese since last year, and I haveeen learning it off of an app, through anime, a school club, and cross checking in multiple places on the internet. I learned that to say that you were at somewhere, you used the particle "に”. ( as in, like,"がっこうにいます-- I'm at school) Now I'm learning from an actual Japanese textbook that they use in high schools, and they use the particle "で" instead. (as in "いまはとしょかんでべんきょうしています"-- Right now I'm studying at the library) So is it that these are interchangable, or is it that I just learned it the wrong way?
先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 1/30/15
The examples you've provided are both correct. The difference between particles に and で is this:

- に goes with verbs that express "being" in a particular place (います・あります) or those that express going in some direction (such as いく)
- で is used when you want to say that some action is being done somewhere (like in your example with the library)

That's the way I was taught, in any case. What I can tell for sure is that they are not interchangeable under no circumstances
百芸
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Posted 1/30/15
One thing that I have some trouble with is in choosing which kanji to use for certain verbs. In English, we'd probably call them homophones: words that sound the same but have different meanings.

Take みる for example. In conversation, it's pretty easy to figure out what type of "seeing" is meant. But when writing, there's a bunch of different kanji. According to the dictionary, 見る is the preferred kanji but I've also been told that 観る should be used when talking about watching a movie, TV, etc. I guess it is the difference between seeing and watching. I'll ignore the other みる kanji, since they are a bit easier to figure out.

There's a similar problem with きく for hearing and listening. :(

Anyway, I'm not always sure which kanji to use even when I look it up in a dictionary. I guess the question I'm asking is, have you found any good resources that help with these types of words? Or is it just best to stick with the preferred kanji and wait to be corrected?
漢和名手
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Posted 1/30/15
One thing that's readily accesible by anyone would be Google translate. If one turns on the site's own IME for Japanese, and type, say "miru," it'll show multiple kanji choices corresponding to that, and if you then choose one, it'll give the translation, of course. The problem is that it's often a very brief one-word translation, and doesn't do much to explain any fine differences in usage. I remember Google Translate once provided example sentences culled from current Japanese newspapers and blogs, which I thought was very useful in learning how actual Japanese used any given word. I can't find this functionality anymore!

I actually kind of like Microsoft Windows' Japanese IME on my own computer. Using it, one can type, say "miru," and it will again display multiple kanji choices. Most of the time, the multiple kanji choices have a small icon next to them, which if one mouses over it will yield an explanation of that kanji and how it differs from the others with the same pronounciation. The problem here is that the explanations are themselves entirely in Japanese too (presumed audience is native users, apparently), so one needs to bring some reading ability to the table in order to use this.
百芸
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Posted 1/31/15
Good points, thanks. I'll try that with Microsoft's IME since that is what I use my Japanese keyboard.

A good dictionary often helps, and I like sites like WWWJDIC since I can easily look up example sentences and do searches to learn more. But that also takes a lot of time.

I think part of the problem is I look for a direct translation. So, take the sentence "I'm watching the baby." Even with examples, I'm not entirely sure the best way to translate the sentence.

Here are a few choices:
赤ちゃんを見ている。
赤ちゃんを観ている。
赤ちゃんを看ている。 (this has more of a medical connotation)

I could even go with:
赤ちゃんを睨んでいる。 (I am staring at the baby)

Now, Google Translate chooses the first of the options, which is what I'd probably do anyway. When in doubt, choose the most common usage. But, for me to get better, I'd like to learn more of the nuances of the different choices.
学生
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Posted 1/31/15 , edited 1/31/15

MidorikaSatsu wrote:

The examples you've provided are both correct. The difference between particles に and で is this:

- に goes with verbs that express "being" in a particular place (います・あります) or those that express going in some direction (such as いく)
- で is used when you want to say that some action is being done somewhere (like in your example with the library)

That's the way I was taught, in any case. What I can tell for sure is that they are not interchangeable under no circumstances


はい,分かりました!答えてくれてはありがとうございます。
漢和名手
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Posted 1/31/15
I imagine really learning the nuances of using the different kanji for verbs is something that ultimately just takes time and effort-- learning and exploring in class (if one has that available), reading whatever Japanese literature (e.g. manga-- one has to start somewhere!), and just experiencing how they're used by actual Japanese authors and writers (and hopefully good Japanese authors and writers-- basically just like we learn English when growing up). If you've someone with you who knows Japanese fluently and is willing to take time to correct you, that'd be the best. I wish I had that.

I happen to have "The Kodansha Kanji Learner's Dictionary," which is pretty good, I think-- though one, of course, has to have the kanji already in mind to look it up. This particular dictionary does emphasize trying to convey the "sense" of the particular kanji in general, and then providing a large list of example words/compounds with translations to help flesh that "sense" out. No sentences, though, just words or occasionally a short phrase.

I do really like the Windows Japanese IME. While its explanations are perhaps just brief summaries, it does basically get right to what I think you're asking, ヂットさん (which is also something I'm trying to learn as well)。 見る is the general and seemingly "default" form-- never wrong, applicable in any situation-- and it doesn't even get an explanation in the IME. The others are all characterized as 常用外,(jyouyougai), not commonly used. 観る can be used for spectacles or sites, 見物 (kenbutsu) in the IME, with a provided example of 芝居 (shibai), and similarly, for movies, as you mentioned, as well. 看る seems to refer more to watching, or watching over-- 世話 (sewa) per the IME, and provided example of 子供の面倒 (kodomo no mendou).

I'm guessing thus 赤ちゃんを見ている is thus perfectly fine. It could perhaps mean one is merely looking at the baby, staring at the baby (睨んでいる, nirandeiru), or watching over the baby etc. The context of the sentence might provide a specific hint as to which sense was intended. I'd guess 赤ちゃんを観ている wouldn't occur too often-- it seems to imply one is looking at the baby like it's a work of art or something. 赤ちゃんを看ている might be used if one wants to more specifically express one is in fact watching over and taking care of the baby.

聞く is specifically mentioned in the IME as the general form (一般的, ippanteki), for hearing, listening, as well as asking. 聴く is more limited (限定的, genteiteki), specifically for perceiving by one's senses (i.e. hearing or listening), while 訊く can be used specifically to mean "to ask." The latter one is also noted to be uncommon in use.
百芸
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Posted 2/2/15
どうもありがとうございます!すごい手伝いですよね。
漢和名手
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Posted 2/2/15
お手伝いを上げられて喜んでる, 僕は。 どう致しまして。
先生
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Posted 3/2/15
I have come across seeing x used frequently by Japanese people, and am kind of stumped by it. Like in this screen capture from a manga I read recently:



When Japanese people use "x" ,does the "x" stand for "and"? If that is the case, how did "x" ever come to mean "and"
百芸
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Posted 3/3/15
Yes, it means "and" and it is read as "と", at least in all the cases I know of.
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