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先生
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Posted 3/3/15 , edited 3/3/15
Yay I'm glad my guess was correct! But do you know why the Japanese used the letter x to mean と/and because to me it seems so random!
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CaelK 
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Posted 3/3/15 , edited 3/3/15
Sometimes I've seen it pronounced cross (クロス), but I only have a few game titles to go on.

This manga, the X is just there, and doesn't have a pronunciation (and 妖狐 is pronounced differently than it should). At least, that's what it says on the title and on Wikipedia.
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A6%96%E7%8B%90%C3%97%E5%83%95SS
学生
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Posted 3/4/15
Once in a while when I'm looking up Japanese words in an online dictionary, they'll be listed as a temporal noun. I only have a general idea as to what temporal nouns are, and that is that they can't be used in the same ways as normal nouns. For example, you can say ”こんねんもよろしくおねがいします” but you can't say ”こんねんはおさかに行きますか?”. Can someone please explain this to me?
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Posted 3/5/15 , edited 3/5/15

Akumanomi wrote:

Once in a while when I'm looking up Japanese words in an online dictionary, they'll be listed as a temporal noun. I only have a general idea as to what temporal nouns are, and that is that they can't be used in the same ways as normal nouns. For example, you can say ”こんねんもよろしくおねがいします” but you can't say ”こんねんはおさかに行きますか?”. Can someone please explain this to me?


Hopefully someone with more expertise will correct any mistakes I make. :D

I know this can be a little confusing since temporal nouns work differently in English as they do in Japanese. As I understand it, temporal nouns can be marked with に, へ, or で since they define when something happens or a period of time in which something is done. The particular particle will depend on the scenario. Common temporal nouns such as 今日will often drop the に.

By themselves, a temporal noun isn't usually a topic since you don't "act" upon a time. Your example of ”こんねんはおさかに行きますか?” doesn't make sense since "this year" won't be going to Osaka. The implicit subject is "you" so, I think the correct sentence would be ”こんねんにおさかに行きますか?” or "Are you going to Osaka this year?" And yes, you can use に more than once in a sentence. Some people avoid that by rephrasing as ”こんねんにおさかへ行きますか?” You have to be careful though. Certain direction verbs require へ instead of に, but I can't list them off the top of my head.

Of course, you can make a topic out of a time period by combining particles such as "週末には".
漢和名手
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Posted 3/5/15
Tough issue-- I'm not even sure I understand the question at hand. CaelKさんいますか? 助けていただきたいんですが。。

While I can guess "temporal" plus "noun" is a noun giving a sense of time, I'm not familiar with this as a distinct word class with its own set of rules. I do understand and agree with ditto-san's first paragraph in any case. Beyond that, I can only nit-pick on the periphery of the question! "This year" or 今年 is read ことし-- I've never heard こんねん. The city of Osaka is おおさか or 大阪, with a long o at the beginning.

I was not aware that 今年は大阪に行きますか? was improper in any way.
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CaelK 
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Posted 3/5/15 , edited 3/13/15

sushipath wrote:
CaelKさんいますか? 助けていただきたいんですが。。


あれ?そんなに人気があんのか、俺?

Random websites and people's blogs say 今年はOOに行く.
conton.jp/archives/2141
www.rankingshare.jp/rank/qxhhzmkoxj

When I try to make sense outta this, it's the nuance and how you want to say what you wanna say. It depends. Ditto's right too.

Are you going to Osaka sometime during this year? (君が今年に大阪に行く?)
Let's talk about this year. Are you going to Osaka? (今年は君が大阪に行く?)
Let's talk about you. Going to Osaka this year? (君は今年に大阪に行く?)
Is this year going to Osaka? (今年が大阪に行く?)

は is a topic marker, not really a hard subject marker like が. You could pop the idea into your listener's head before asking if they're going to Osaka (a more abstract and indirect approach), or you can flat out name a stretch of time when you ask if he's going (the concrete and more direct approach). Put が right after 今年 though, and you'd better be speakin' metaphysics.

And with that in mind, 今年はよろしくお願いします translates pretty easily.

'Least, that's how my reasoning's going for me. This really is a hard question, and (for me) it's all because of that particle は.
漢和名手
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Posted 3/5/15
助けてくれて有り難う御座いました! Your (CaelK) Japanese seems to be the most fluent in the group, as far as I can tell, and if I'm recalling correctly, I vaguely remember reading somewhere on the forums that you've even lived and worked in-country for a while. You may be as close to native speaker as we have here. As mentioned earlier, your shiritori word explanations are great to read. Myself, I might be able to cobble together a short paragraph, but it'll take a while, and I'll end up with a slight headache afterwards for all the effort spent.
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CaelK 
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Posted 3/5/15 , edited 3/6/15

sushipath wrote:

I vaguely remember reading somewhere on the forums that you've even lived and worked in-country for a while.


Uhh... did I ever say that? I know someone who does, but I only go there for a few weeks at a time every so often.

I'm still learning and I do make mistakes, though. Transitive and intransitive can trip me up at times, and sometimes I use particles in ways they shouldn't be. The question here was kinda new to me, too. は is one of the first particles you learn, but the nuance can be pretty elusive.

It helps I have the power of the internet to help me with dictionary lookup, and that I can take all the time I want when posting something to the webs, but then this is a forum, and not a conversation. I do a bit worse when I have to speak. ^_^;
百芸
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Posted 3/6/15

CaelK wrote:
は is a topic marker, not really a hard subject marker like が. You could pop the idea into your listener's head before asking if they're going to Osaka (a more abstract and indirect approach), or you can flat out name a stretch of time when you ask if he's going (the concrete and more direct approach). Put が right after 今年 though, and you'd better be speakin' metaphysics.

And with that in mind, 今年はよろしくお願いします translates pretty easily.


That's a very good point! I was thinking about that last night, but it's great to get a different perspective, especially one more precise than mine. Thanks!

Like you said, it depends on the nuance. If you want to emphasize the time of the action, then は seems to be the best choice. I've often heard people suggest you translate は as "And as for...". This is a lot like your example of "Let's talk about this year. Are you going to Osaka?" (今年は君が大阪に行く?)
先生
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Posted 3/24/15
Does anyone know when you use the punctuation mark 『』in Japanese as opposed to the punctuation mark 「」? From my understanding, 『』functions like our punctuation mark ' ' in English, while 「」functions like " " . Am I wrong about this?
学生
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Posted 4/3/15

Ichibanx3 wrote:

Does anyone know when you use the punctuation mark 『』in Japanese as opposed to the punctuation mark 「」? From my understanding, 『』functions like our punctuation mark ' ' in English, while 「」functions like " " . Am I wrong about this?


There`s a different use for both of them:

『』 These are used when you quote "Non changing names" for example country names or restaurant names.
Here`s an example....『三笠』というレストランで食べたことありますか?Have you eaten at the restaurant called "Mikasa"?
Because you can`t change the name of the restaurant you quoted.

「」These are used when you quote something a person said (thus you can change a little bit the sentence)

Here`s an example...ダイチー君は欠席するんだって、迎えに行ったときお母さんは「風邪を引いたので今日だけ休ませてください」と行っていました。
Did you hear that Daichi-kun isn`t coming with us, when I went to pick him up his mother told me 「He caught a cold so please let him rest just for today」
In this case you can change what the mother said or you can shorten the sentence, that`s why you don`t use 『』

Hope I helped you, if you want some more examples just ask.



先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 4/5/15
Not sure whether this is the right thread to ask this sort of question but whatever, here goes:

How do you guys learn kanji? I'd really love to improve my knowledge of written Japanese but I don't even know where to start! Apart from simple memorisation of the 25-kanji sets we get on our classes I've no idea what else I can do.
Should I read more texts in Japanese? If so, then what comes next so that I don't forget the characters after a minute of reading? Yeah, I tend to do that -_-

よろしくお願いいたしまぁす! ご返事をお待ちしておりまぁす!
学生
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Posted 4/5/15
About writing Kanji the best way is writing them down a LOT LOT times, even if you know the readings and even common words using the kanji if you don`t write them down you tend to forget them.

My japanese teacher (she`s japanese) always tell me that I have to write them on a daily basis because nowadays computers and such are replacing handwriting and if you don`t do an effort yourself to write them even without having to.

Also learning the most common words for a kanji it`s helpful.

Hope I helped you.
先生
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Posted 4/5/15
Thank you for your explanation Job san! Thanks to you, I understand it better now!

Satz-senpai: I believe that the best way to learn kanji isn't by rote memorization. You will get nowhere if you memorize each kanji stroke-by-stroke. I once read an article on Tofugu explaining that the best way to learn each kanji character is to learn it by the radicals that make up the character. Since I'm horrible at explaining things, here's the article: http://www.tofugu.com/2010/03/25/the-5-biggest-mistakes-people-make-when-learning-kanji/ I hope this article helps you senpai~

Here's a useful pdf sheet you can use to study: http://www.tofugu.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/kanji-radicals-cheatsheet.pdf
百芸
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Posted 4/5/15
I liked learning from "Remembering the Kanji" but to be honest, how I really remember them is from writing them down. On my old Sony Clie, I had a program called King Kanji. It was like a flash card program but it integrated writing with the tests. Not only did I learn the kanji, but I learned the correct stroke order for them. The latter is very important for looking up difficult kanji in a dictionary.
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