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学生
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Posted 12/12/14
Just saying that Baka 馬鹿 is written with the kanji for horse 馬 and deer 鹿.
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Posted 12/12/14

thespiritofearlyeducation wrote:

Just saying that Baka 馬鹿 is written with the kanji for horse 馬 and deer 鹿.


I know, I believe I wrote about that some few posts ago. I was simply saying that using kana to write "baka" seems to be used more often than with kanji (or at least that it appears to be a tendency).
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Posted 12/12/14

MidorikaSatsu wrote:


thespiritofearlyeducation wrote:

Just saying that Baka 馬鹿 is written with the kanji for horse 馬 and deer 鹿.


I know, I believe I wrote about that some few posts ago. I was simply saying that using kana to write "baka" seems to be used more often than with kanji (or at least that it appears to be a tendency).


Yeah but maybe it's because 馬鹿 takes longer to write than ばか so it's just easier.
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Posted 12/12/14 , edited 12/12/14
おつかれさまでした!とても面白いです。私も「ゐ」と「ゑ」が知りませんでした。
On the topic of 馬鹿, I think using the kanji seems quite a length to go to if you're calling someone an idiot. Though I did come across it written in kanji in a novel once. I didn't recognise it so I had to look it up, it was only after some searching that I realised I should've known the character for horse, which would've made my search a lot faster. When I then found out the meaning, I did feel like a bit of a ばか!
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Posted 12/12/14
I love the activity in this thread! I wish there was a way i could promote this thread so more people could participate! I also once came across the kanji for baka in a manga I was reading but I don't remember what manga it was And is it just me, or does it seem like a lot of Japanese adjectives seem to be written in Hiragana instead of kanji. Like so far, I have never saw おいしい written in kanji as 美味しい. (I love it how the Kanji that makes it up means "beautiful taste"!). Also, senpai, I never knew that Japanese newspapers use more formal words derived from Chinese. Is Japanese news broadcasts on TV the same?
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Posted 12/13/14 , edited 12/13/14
LESSON 3 – 第3課

おはようございます、みなさぁん!おげんきですかぁ。

Today we'll be talking about katakana. I expect it to be quite a short lesson, as most of what I've already said about hiragana applies to katakana as well. Dakuten, handakuten, sokuon and youon work exactly the same in both syllabaries, the only difference being that you have to use the symbols for katakana (so that sokuon will now be ッ , youon will use ャ、ュ and ョ, etc.), obviously.

Chouonpu is the only major difference but, luckily, there aren't many rules you need to remember when using it. There's only one, actually, and it says that all vowels are lengthened with the same symbol: ー. Yes, it's basically straight line that somehow resembles 一 (ichi), which is a kanji for “one”. Please note, however, that there are two ways of writing a text in Japanese:

- 横書き(よこがき; yokogaki) - "horizontal writing" – written in pretty much the same way as “our” (Western) script: in horizontal lines, starting from left and going right. You get the gist, right?
- 縦書き (たてがき; tategaki), "vertical writing” - it's a traditional way of writing a Japanese text, where you not only go with vertical lines (from up to down) but also from right to left. Those of you who read manga in Japanese should be already familiar with tategaki, which is often the way the text appears in speech bubbles. To show the rest of you how it works :



So anyway, a chouonpu in tategaki will not be an “ichi-like” horizontal line but rather a vertical one. Please do pay attention to that.

Just to show you a couple of examples with chouonpu (notice how they're all loan words):
- マナー (manaa; “manner”), インターネット (intaanetto; “Internet”)
- コピー機 (kopiiki; “photocopier”), アイスクリーム (aisukuriimu; "ice cream")
- パラシュート (parashuuto; “parachute”), クール (kuuru; "cool")
- グレー (guree; “grey/gray”); ホームステイ (hoomusutei; "homestay") | Notice how both "ee" and "ei" can be used for the same set of sounds
- フォーク (fooku; “fork”); ローン (roon; "loan")

Another thing to be careful with: remember when I told you how kana can be used for telling what is the kun or on reading for a kanji character in dictionaries? If yes, then you probably also remember that we generally use hiragana for kun reading and katakana for on reading. My point is: when using katakana for on reading we do not use the ー symbol. Instead of that, we follow the same rules as in hiragana. To illustrate what I mean, take a look at yet another kanji description from my dictionary:

ON readings: チョウ KUN readings: おさ、ながい Meaning: long, leader

Notice how there's チョウ instead of チョー? Remember: whenever you're using katakana to transcribe either a reading of a kanji character or any Japanese word that is not a loan-word from, let's say, English, you follow the same rules as with hiragana. For all other cases (loan words, onomatopeias, etc.) you're fine with just ー.

Here come the charts:






To answer some question you might have at this point:
- How the heck do I differentiate between シ and ツ or ン and ソ?
Good question. I'm pretty sure that virtually every person learning kana encounters the same problem (and I was struggling with it myself for a considerable amount of time). All advice I can give at this point is to try to make the strokes of シ (shi) and ン (n) more horizontal and those of ツ (tsu) and ソ (so) should be more vertical. Just don't make them horizontal/vertical all the way – in that case you might end up writing リ (ri) instead of ソ (so).

- Why are there kanji among these symbols?
Those of you slightly more familiar with Japanese writing may notice the similarity between some of the symbols to kanji characters. Examples: カ (kana: ka / kanji: chikara), ニ (kana/kanji: ni), タ (kana: ta / kanji: yuu), ロ (kana: ro / kanji: kuchi), チ/千 (kana/kanji : chi); there might be more. As I said before, katakana was, in fact, derived from kanji characters, hence the similarities. Be prepared to re-read any text in Japanese you might encounter in the future to avoid possible mistakes. I, for once, often mistake kanji 夕べ (yuube; “evening”) for kana タベ (tabe).

- Why is “he” the same for both hiragana and katakana?
I don't know the reason but that's just the way it is. Anyway, the charts are okay, there was no typo in there :D

I guess that will be it for today, as there's really nothing more I can add to the topic. Make sure you practice, I mean, those of you who are learning and want to learn.

And yes, I'm happy for all forms of feedback we're getting on this thread Also, to answer 先生's question: not sure One hell of an answer, right? But seriously, I'm not sure about Japanese TV, I never had the opportunity to watch any channel like that. I've yet to check that.

Well then, see you next time! The next lesson will be about... oh, let's make that a surprise :)

ご苦労様でした!
ごくろうさまでした!

EDIT: Just realised it's not everything I wanted to say about it after all ._. Stuff missing will appear in the next lesson. では、また明日。
先生
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Posted 12/13/14
Good work, senpai! Thanks for another great post! I have no questions on katakana since you answered them all on the bottom of the post! I also want to add that I've found シ ツ and ン ソ to be quite difficult! Also, thank you for adding the charts! I didn't know that there was also a katakana wi and we! Anyways I look forward to reading your next post as always!

どうもありがとうございましたせんぱい!
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Posted 12/15/14 , edited 12/15/14
LESSON 4 – 第4課

おはよう、みなさんよ!

It occurred to me yesterday while taking shower than I had forgotten to include a pretty crucial feature of katakana in the last lesson so I'm going to cover that today along with the main topic of this lesson. The reason it's important is that we can't really go and start writing foreign/loan words (non-Japanese ones) without it. I'm talking about additional sounds in katakana.

Let's say you want to write the word “fan” (as in: the person who likes sth very much) in Japanese. As a loan-word, you're obviously going to write it in katakana. So far so good. The problem arises when you take a look at the chart (or reach to the depths of your mind) and see that the only possible symbol that includes the sound “f” is フ (fu). That's indeed a big problem.

Thankfully, there's an easy solution to the problem: all you need to do in this situation is to add a small ア (a) after the フ symbol and what you get as a result is ファ (fa). Thus, you're all set to write the word “fan”: ファン.

You might have noticed that the procedure is very similar to that of youon, where we added small ヤ、ユ or ヨ. The difference here is that you can also use the “a-line” symbols (ア、イ、ウ、エ、オ) to create additional sounds (e.g. フィ(fi)、フェ(fe)、フォ(fo)).



There might be more sounds than just those in the chart; also, they're not ordered in any way.

You might ask why there are sounds for “wi”, “we” and “wo” while we already have them in basic kana. It's simple: ゐ/ヰ and ゑ/ヱ are nearly out of use and moreover, they tend to be replaced in native words by “i” and “e” (Remember the beer Yebisu? It can be written either as ヱビス or エビス). That's the reason why I put the “w” in brackets in the charts, as it tends to be omitted from pronunciation. As for を/ヲ (wo), it is hardly ever used when it's not a particle in a sentence. Similarly to “wi” and “we”, it's pronunciation is “o” rather than “wo”.

When I think of it, there's yet another thing I failed to mention, namely the usage of sokuon (little “tsu”). As you may remember, sokuon doubles the consonant that stands after it (like せっぷん; seppun; “kiss”). But it doesn't mean like you can put it anywhere you like (unless you're dealing with a loan/ foreign word). Let me list all the symbols you can safely put a little “tsu” before in native contemporary Japanese:
- “ka-line” (か、き、く、け、こ/カ、キ、ク、ケ、コ)
- “sa-line” (さ、し、す、せ、そ/サ、シ、ス、セ、ソ)
- “ta-line” (た、ち、つ、て、と/タ、チ、ツ、テ、ト)
- “pa-line” (ぱ、ぴ、ぷ、ぺ、ぽ/パ、ピ、プ、ぺ、ポ)

We don't put a little “tsu” in front of “na-line” or “ma-line” but we can achieve a similar effect to that of sokuon if we use “n” (ん/ン). Take words like おんな (onna; “woman”) or さんまい (sanmai; “three flat objects”) for example. Also, please note that “n” tends to be pronounced like “m” in front of “ma-line” (it's also possible to transcribe the word above as “sammai”) and also “ba-line” (だんぼう; danbou/dambou; “heating”) and “pa-line” (せんぱい; senpai/sempai).

Speaking of which, I'd like to move on to the proper topic of today's lesson, and that is text to speech relations or, simply put, pronunciation.

Now, I'm fully aware that this topic was supposed to be about writing and writing only from the very start; however, I consider pronunciation not only to be a very important part of any language in general but I also believe that there are both differences and connections between speech and writing that have to be highlighted for the sake of learning. That, and I simply wanted to talk about it :D

Japanese is, I presume, quite a problematic language for an average English native speaker's tongue. Truth be told, any foreign language is troublesome in terms of of the way they sound. Every single language, you see, has a certain set of sounds that are used to produce words, sentences – speech in general. These are called phonemes (you don't have to remember the name). Phonemes differ between one language and the other one, so that it's often the case when we try to speak in a foreign language that has sounds which your native language doesn't normally use, we often mess things up. And by that I mean that we try to imitate the foreign sound by means of your native language's set of sounds.

To make my chaotic explanation more clear: imagine you are a Japanese native speaker who learns English. In English we have two sounds represented by “th”: one voiceless, as in three, and the other one voiced, as in then. There are no such sounds in Japanese, so it is common practice for Japanese speakers of English to pronounce voiceless “th” as “s” (“third” would be サード/saado) and voiced “th” as “z” or “j” (“the world” - ザ・ワールド/za waarudo; “the end” - ジ・エンド/ji endo). I can say from personal experience that Poles also mess this up terribly: voiceless “th” may be “t”, “s” or “f” and voiced “th” can be “d”, “z” or “v”.

If you get the gist of it, then I'm going to get straight to the juicy parts so as to save you from more terminology from descriptive grammar or phonetics classes. What I am going to do is to give you advice on how to pronounce some sounds in Japanese, trying to provide the most thorough and clear explanations to the best of my knowledge and ability. For those who find it TL;DR (and I will absolutely understand that approach) and others who want to improve their spoken Japanese: listen and speak; speak and listen. Whether you watch Japanese TV, listen to JP radio, watch JP cartoons, etc. try to pay close attention to how the words actually sound and then try to utter it yourself. Have in mind, however, that you might not always spot the difference between the native speaker's and your pronunciation; hence, I believe that some explanation will prove useful.

The descriptions of the items in the list will be as follows: the romaji representation of the sound, its phonetic symbol, a set of examples and a description. I ask that you treat the phonetic symbols as pieces of trivia – unless you've had some phonetic training these won't be of much use to you. If you take interest in them, however, you can always try to search for them on the Internet and find some recordings that will show you what's the sound like in real life.

Let us start then:

- “a”; [ä] - similar to the vowel found in up, button or cut. I say similar, as your mouth should be ever so slightly more open. Other than that, the difference is not so crucial.

- “i”; [ i ] - pretty much like the one in eat, feed or scream. Just remember to make it shorter.

- “u”; [ɯᵝ] – now that one's a problem. It's definitely nothing like English “oo”, that's for sure. It is hard for me to explain the way it works and I think it would be best if you listened to it yourselves. Have a link, then:

- “e”; [e̞] - basically like “e” in English: let, step or debt.

- “o”; [o̞] - something like “o” in score, more or draw. Again, make sure it's short enough.

- “k”; [k] – nothing to add here, it's “k”, as in crunch, cool or car.

- “g”; [g] / [ŋ] – it can be “g”, as in gruesome or gap but also “ng”, as in king. One of my Japanese teachers who was also a native speaker told my class last year that “g” in a word だいがく (daigaku; “university”) is rather pronounced as “ng”. I don't know whether what she said can be taken for granted (apparently, Auntie Wikipedia says it can be used interchangeably) but I once heard a Japanese song:

where the word “daigaku” appeared and it actually was pronounced with “ng” instead of “g”. A word of caution. It's not “n+g” but a single sound. I wish I could tell that to my other Japanese teacher who keeps talking in this way and it drives me mad x_x

- “s”; [s] – your average English “s”, as in snake, Sam or smoke.

- “sh”; [ɕ] – somewhat different than English “sh”, I'd say it's a bit higher, if that makes sense; perhaps it's best if I give you a link so that you can hear for yourself:


- “z”; [z] / [dz] – it's “z” as in zoo, eyes or ozone or “dz”, somewhat as in leadz, fades or goods; out of these two, the “dz” variant seems to be the most common one, although “z” is also possible.

- “t”; [t] – just like English “t”: turn, tone or start.

- “d”; [d] – like English “d”: draw, sad or Adam.

- “ch”; [tɕ] – again, it's not exactly like English “ch”; link:


- “j”; [dʑ] – similar to English “j” (judge) but not quite; link:


- “ts”; [t͡s] – as in beats, Tzar or cats.

- “n”, as appears in na-line; [n] – like English “n”; nose, nice or sand.

- “n” (ん・ン) ; oh boy here we go: [n] / [m] / [ŋ] / [ɴ]:
- it's [n] (similar to normal English “n”) in front of d, t and n (as above)
- it's [m] (English “m”) in front of m, b or p (as mentioned somewhere in this lesson)
- it's [ŋ] (English “ng” as in king) in front of k and g
- finally, it's [ɴ] at the the end of an utterance; this sound is called uvular nasal and it's rather similar to [ŋ]. Check it out:


- “h”; [h] – pretty much like English “h”, as in hood, hero or hurry.

- “f”; [ɸ] – another trickster but one I can (hopefully) explain. The difference between this sound and English “f” is this: when you pronounce English “f”, your lower teeth make slight contact with your upper lip and then the air from your lungs flows through the gap between them. In the case of [ɸ], the air must flow between both your lips. It is as though you were saying “Phew!”. Just don't press them too hard against each other, it should be a free flow with audible friction.

- “v”; [β] – just like the one above, expect that it's voiced.

- “b”; [ b ] – English “b”, nothing to see here; balloon, scrub or Sabbath.

- “p”; [p] – no surprise here either, your average English “p”: pan, scoop or super.

- “m”; [m] – guess what? No differences; manner, roam or hammer.

- “y”; [j] - “y”, as in English year, yacht or you.

- “r”; [ɺ] – another troublemaker; if you're familiar with the American way of pronouncing “t” (which sounds somewhat like “d”) in words like city, atom or society, you're good to go. If in doubt, check the audio file in the link. You may hear something like “l” but that's not quite it.


- “w”; [w] – as in English: water, quiet, or wake.

Oh God, I've actually made you go through all of this x_x First of all, I'd like to apologise to you if you find th part regarding pronunciation difficult/impossible to understand and/or if you think that I provided poor explanations. Speaking a foreign language in a manner of a native speaker is not something one acquires overnight and my half-assed lectures on it won't change it either. Thus I repeat my piece of advice: listen and speak. Imitate as accurately as possible so that one day you might achieve the desired pronunciation. If you feel discouraged:


I should probably stick to writing only.

Anyway, thanks for your attention and patience and congratulations to all those who made it through my courses so far. As always, if you have questions regarding the lessons (or Japanese in general), don't be afraid to ask – I'll try my hardest to provide you with a satisfying answer.

The next lesson will be about radicals (部首; ぶしゅ).

ごくろうさまでした!
先生
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Posted 12/16/14
Wow amazing post senpai!! I didn't expect you to cover pronunciation, but it's great that you did! For me the pronunciation was the easiest part of learning Japanese because the Japanese vowels a, i, u, e, and o are pronounced the same exact way as the Spanish vowels, as well as the Spanish r is pronounced very closely to the Japanese one, which really made Japanese pronunciation easy for me :D

Also, there's something I wanted to add: My sensei said that although Japanese doesn't have pitches like Mandarin, instead of having a relatively flat pronunciation, sometimes Japanese stresses a particular syllable. For instance take kami, which can mean either God, paper, or hair. Although kami has a separate kanji for hair, God, and paper, certain syllables are stressed. I think it is as follows:

kaMI (the mi) is stressed when you mean "hair"
kami is pronounced relatively flat when you mean "God"
KAmi (the ka) is stressed when you mean "paper"

I hope I'm right about what I wrote above, my sensei was explaining it, but he spoke too fast, I didn't have time to write it in my notes So if I'm wrong, please correct me! Also yay I can't wait to read senpai's post about radicals! Radicals are an important part for remembering kanji.
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Posted 12/16/14
どうもありがとう^^

I remember my teacher telling me a similar thing last year; it was about the word "hashi" (as in bridge or chopsticks) but I don't remember which was which Nevertheless, I think you're right about that one.

Yes, radicals can be lifesavers when learning (and remembering) kanji. I'll try to post the next lesson ASAP
先生
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Posted 12/17/14
Yeah my teacher also mentioned the hashi one and he also said ikura can have a double pronunciation (how much is it? vs salmon roe) but I can't remember which one is pronounced which way And yay I'm so looking forward to your lesson on radicals!

ありがとうございましたせんぱい!
先生
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Posted 12/17/14
Oh yeah senpai, I forgot to mention that yesterday I was watching a broadcast on Ustream in Japanese and I was wondering why so many comments in the lower right hand said "888888" as seen here in the screen capture:
Sorry for the bad quality of this picture

Then I looked it up and it said it is Internet slang for the applause sound. Is that true? I love learning about Japanese Internet slang because they definitely don't teach you Japanese slang in the classroom!
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Posted 12/17/14
I've seen it a lot, too, but I had no idea about its meaning. I suppose it makes sense: "8" is "はち" in Japanese, right? If we turn は into ぱ (and it often happens in kanji compounds), we get ぱち, which stands for "clap". So a series of 8's would make a clapping sound. I wonder if my line of logic is correct Anyway, it's very interesting, 先生, thank you for mentioning that! It's always great to find out new stuff like this :)

 
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Posted 12/17/14
LESSON 5 – 第5課

おはようございます、みなさん!じゅぎょうをはじめましょうねぇ。

Hello again, brothers in Japanese! Hello and congratulations on your perseverance in following my lessons! You should now have some idea about Japanese writing systems in general and be able to write using kana syllabaries. That is, unless you already knew all these things. Whatever the case, I'd like to move towards a little something that, I believe, will be of a great help to all of you endeavouring to learn kanji. And I mean radicals.



Not this.

Radicals (部首; ぶしゅ) or roots are, simply put, elements that are present in kanji characters. These not only serve as means of cataloguing kanji inside dictionaries but they also indicate (or can hint at) meaning of the character. Remember the example of the character for “bronze” (銅)? We had said that it contains an element that looks like the kanji for “metal”, “gold” or “money” (金). It is a radical.

Although we had also said that the character 銅 has one more component (namely 同), you must be aware that every single kanji has exactly one radical. No more nor less. I learned this from my own mistake when, during a lesson, I noticed that a character consists of several “radical-like” elements and I thought them to be all radicals – that's when the teacher corrected me.

To illustrate my way of thinking from back then, let's take a look at the kanji for “tea” - 茶 (ちゃ). We could say it has three following elements: 艹 (くさかんむり; grass), 人 (ひと; human) and 木 (き; tree). All of these elements can be found in various lists of radicals (to which I'll be linking you guys in a moment) so it's only natural that one would take them for radicals, right? Even if they appear to be so, only the first element ( 艹 ) is the radical of 茶. It kind of makes sense, if you think about it: there is a subtle association existing between “grass” and “tea”, right?

Now, you're probably wondering how to recognise a radical when you see one. Truth is, I feel I'd like to know as well To be serious, though, as radicals come in all shapes and sizes they can be found virtually anywhere within a kanji character. Kanji that consist of just one radical (like 金) are, no doubt, the easiest to identify. What about the rest then?

Okay, so let me first give you a link to the page where you will find a whole lengthy list of radicals (over here):
http://kanjialive.com/214-traditional-kanji-radicals/

Now, if you take a look at the page, you'll first notice the classification of radicals based on their location within the character (starting with “へん (hen)”). I think this is pretty self-explanatory but I'm going to give you a few examples anyway in case you feel lost:
- へん – radical on the left side; example:⻂(ころもへん), as in 初(はつ; “start, new”)
- つくり – radical on the right side; example: ⽄(おのづくり), as in 新(あたらしい; “new”)
- かんむり – radical on the top; example: ⺌(しょうかんむり), as in 光(ひかり; “light”)
- あし – radical on the bottom; example: ⾇ (まいあし), as in 舞(まい; “dance”)
- かまえ – radical that enclose the character (surround it from more than one side); example: ⼞ (くにがまえ), as in 困(こまる; “to be in trouble”)
- たれ – radical which “hangs down”, that is, they enclose both the top and the left side of the character; example: ⼴ (まだれ), as in 広(ひろい; “wide, spacious”)
- にょう – radical that “wraps around” the bottom of the character (both its bottom and the left side); example: ⻌( しんにょう), as in 近(ちかい; “close, near”)

In case you wondered why some of the kanji readings in hiragana are underlined, it's given so that you know what's the reading of the kanji itself (in 近い/ちかい, the reading of the kanji itself is ちか); the rest in kana is the so-called okurigana (I think I forgot to mention the term), that tells us about the lexical/grammatical category of the word.

Although all the examples I've given include the name of the category they belong to, have in mind that it's not always the case. ⺡(さんすい; often present in kanji associated with water) doesn't have such a suffix in its name; when you look at its position in a kanji (left side), you can say it's like へん radicals.

Back to the original question, that is: how to recognise what element is a radical which one is not? Searching the Web produced quite an amusing, yet pretty logical answer. If we were to follow this “rule of a thumb” described in the post below:
http://chinese.stackexchange.com/questions/215/how-can-one-determine-the-radical-for-a-given-character
the most sensible action would be to look for radicals in their most natural positions (i.e. described above), and I quite agree.

The problem remains, however, if we are presented with a kanji where we can identify two legit radicals (let's say, a へん and つくり radical). In a situation like this, I think we can only rely on a dictionary of some sorts :D

Speaking of which, although I probably should do that in another post, here's one application that you may find useful for looking up words or even learning. It's called zkanji
http://zkanji.sourceforge.net/download.php
and it's a quite comprehensive and free kanji/lexicon dictionary with a plethora of features, such as searching the character by its spelling, it's meaning, by radicals, JLPT levels, etc. You can even draw the character if you're not sure what's its meaning or reading. It saved me more than a couple of times so I'd definitely recommend it :)

So, what's the other use of radicals except being a way of cataloguing kanji? I mentioned it before a couple of times that the radicals can indicate the characters' meaning. But it's not only that! When you've learned the shape, number of strokes and stroke order of some of the most commonly used radicals (or kanji that make them), it will become so much easier for you to read and (especially) write kanji.

For instance, let's take the character 議 (ぎ; “debate”). If you can't see it due to the font being small, there you go:
http://jisho.org/kanji/details/%E8%AD%B0
Does it still look scary? I bet it does; it always does at the first glance. 20 strokes is not something to be taken lightly after all, right? But is it really as demonic as you might think? We can say it consists of about 4 parts: 言 (its radical), 王, 我 and two additional strokes. Now, let's say that you are familiar with the individual parts but you see 議 for the first time. So instead of learning by heart the strokes and stroke order from scratch you can just put the pieces together every time you want to write it. In a way, kanji are like puzzles. What's important is that you don't mess the pieces :)

I guess that covers everything I had to say about radicals. If you know some kanji already, then taking a look at the list when you have free time and trying to identify their elements would definitely not go to waste. As for beginners, I don't think that stuffing your head with all the 214 radicals at once will be of use right now. I mean, if you feel you're ready and willing – no stopping you, learn to your heart's content It's just that when I'll finally start discussing individual kanji (which is going to take place in lesson #7 if not the next one), I'm planning to include all necessary information about the character, including its radical. I miss the charts, so I think I might end up doing some :)

Anyway, see you next time and グッド・ラック with learning!

The next lesson will be the last theoretical one. After that we move on to kanji.

ごくろうさまでした!ごきょうりょくにかんしゃいたします!
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Posted 12/18/14
I'm glad to have shared that knowledge about "8888" with you senpai! Whenever I watch the next broadcast, I'll make sure to pay attention to the comments to see if I can learn more Japanese slang! :D
On that note, ありがとうございましたセンバイ!8888

I really look forward to every one of your lessons and this one about radicals was very informative! For me it's hard to tell which part of the kanji character is the radical, but I'll make sure to check out your links soon!

Also I wanted to mention that one stroke makes a huge difference for instance: 氷 (ice) vs 水 (water). Anyways once again thank you for all your hard work! 8888
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