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Post Reply 冊のパーフェクト漢字教室
漢和名手
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Posted 1/2/15
Actually, I think woman can use kimi for a man when she's either equal to or superior to the man. Put another way, anata is at least polite if not actually conveying some respect towards the person being referred to. Kimi is neutral to familiar. Omae is very familiar, and even rough, masculine. Omae does seem used often among men/boys who know each other reasonably well, are of similar status, or from a superior to an inferior-- so no, it's not always deprecatory, though sometimes it is.

As for Mandarin, I'd guess everyone in a beginning level class will be equally "lost" at first, so nothing to really worry about! Your Japanese studies will give you some familiarity with the characters, of course. Once you get started, you'll realize quickly, though, that while there are a lot of parallels, Chinese doesn't always use the same characters for particular things as Japanese, so don't be surprised nor expect exact one-to-one correspondence. For example, 牛乳 is also milk in Chinese (pronounced niu2 ru3), but this particular word is more written or formal in its usage. In common usage or speech, milk is 牛奶 (niu2 nai3). Also, the numerals after the words-- as you may already know, Chinese is tonal. Mandarin is relatively easy with 4 tones (or 5, depending) which are mostly invariant. This is in comparison to other dialects, e.g. Taiwanese (or Fujian, Hokkien) has 7, which can shift around, and Cantonese I hear has 9!

If you do want to get a head start before class begins, it might be useful to pre-learn the pinyin (拼音) system used in your class-- this is the Romanization system (like Romaji for Japanese). I'd guess most classes for English-speaking Chinese learners will begin with a pinyin system, which is a relatively immediately accessible way to aid in pronounciation as well as write Chinese, before confronting students with the more daunting Chinese characters. I think the most widely used nowadays is the 漢語拼音 or han4 yu3 pin1 yin1 system, which is what I'm typing in this message, and the basis for the Chinese IME on English-based Windows OS. (Native Chinese have their own IMEs for Chinese.) Once you've mastered pinyin (which won't take long), you can then fully concentrate on learning the characters.

Speaking of characters, in my Chinese class way back in college years, they didn't introduce actual characters until about 10 weeks into the class. However, I decided early on to learn the characters for every single vocaublary words we were taught as soon as the word was introduced to us. It took a fair bit of extra effort, but in the end, my reading and writing ability far exceeded the rest of the class for years after that as a result. I might recommend the same if you feel up to it. After all, nobody actually uses pinyin Romanization to write Chinese-- i.e. at least no native communities do. Real Chinese use actual Chinese characters. Pinyin (or native phonetic system, 注音符號 zhu4 yin1 fu2 hao4) is really used only for language instruction or in dictionaries and such.

To keep on topic with MidorikaSatsu's thread, also learn to write the characters with the proper stroke order. I don't know quite why it is, but writing characters with the proper stroke order helps one's penmanship to look more "correct"-- it looks better, and less like a child's writing or "chicken scratch."

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Posted 1/3/15
Hello again, 皆さん~

I have some more kanji sheets for you:

#9-13 http://1drv.ms/1BgOC5F

And with that, we've covered all Grade 1 characters for numbers (plus 1 from Grade 2)! For the next time, I'll try to prepare a slightly different sheet dedicated solely to numbers themselves. I'll also discuss ordinal numbers, possibly even classifiers and I'll add bonus characters for numbers beyond 10,000.

A huge thanks to you, 先生, for the suggestion about furigana. How come the thought hasn't ever crossed my mind? Anyway, it does look a lot nicer now, thank you again!

As for, "Rikka", it was one of these totally "random" words that I just happened to find in my dictionary and put them into the sheet due to lack of better ones. Personally, I've never seen it being used instead of "yuki" It might be because I don't read as much text in Japanese as I should but my guess is that it's usage must be pretty rare or maybe even obsolete. As I could not find a sentence example with the word "rikka" in it, I asked Google for help and what I got was the girl from Chuunibyou named Rikka. Thus the example.

To answer your second question, apparently yakuza used to be present in Roppongi but I've no idea whether the same holds true nowadays. And, hmm... I think I saw Black Lagoon a couple of times in bookshops, in the comics/manga section. Other than that, I'm not familiar with the series.

Also, thanks a bunch for the piece of information you've provided about Chinese, sushipathさん. Out of curiosity, do you find tones difficult? I've never tried Chinese in my life but I get shudders whenever I hear of tones Also, would say that the characters of Simplified Chinese are easier than the Japanese ones (or the other way around)?

また明日~
先生
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Posted 1/3/15 , edited 1/3/15
Thank you so so much for all the advice Sushi-san! I really appreciate it! I never thought of also learning the kanji/characters for the vocab words. Like in Japanese class, since we are a beginning class, sensei always hands out sheets in romaji and I would add the hiragana over the romaji because romaji really bothers me, but not once did I think of looking up the kanji and adding it! Thank you so much for that tip! Even though it'll take me extra time, it'll be well worth the effort for both my Japanese and Mandarin studies!

I got a Mandarin grammar book yesterday and started skimming it and the tones seem like they're the hardest part, like it describes the different tone changes. I feel like it's not something I can study on my own, that it's something I really need to be in a classroom to learn. Though, I'm always happy when Japanese Kanji and Mandarin characters overlap. Like 水、目、日 mean the same in Japanese and Mandarin--just pronounced differently in Mandarin. I learned yesterday that 好 means "good" in Mandarin (Is that correct? I saw it in my book yesterday and it stuck in my head). I was so happy when I went to the mall today and in the food court there was a Chinese eatery and I saw 好味 (I was happy because I understood it! It means "Good taste" or something along those lines, right?) Sushi-san I've read that Mandarin grammar is easier than Japanese grammar, is that true?

And I don't have a windows--I have a mac and I just installed the Pinyin keyboard. I have yet to figure out how to use it since I have to learn Pinyin, as you mentioned. I'm confused between Traditional and simplified Chinese, my course is going to use Traditional--is there a big difference between Traditional and Simplified?

In keeping with Senpai's thread, I've decided to attach these pictures which will be helpful even for those learning Kanji!

I'm sorry the characters on the right hand cut off. I knew the basic rules of stroke order already, but was glad to learn the special stroke order rules, since my Japanese Kanji book doesn't cover these special rules:


Thanks to Japanese, I knew both the traditional radical and alternative forms, but never knew the radicals with simplified forms,ms. The only radical with simplified form I knew was the grass one:


I know everyone always says to pay attention to stroke order, and I definitely do pay attention to my stroke order. However, I feel like many native Chinese/ Japanese sometimes blend their strokes together. I know this is an extreme example, but when I went to the Chinese supermarket, I saw this and couldn't make out the strokes at all: (sorry it's blurry)


This is another example of the blending of strokes together, but it's more readable:
With my limited vocabulary, I can understand 所 and 左

And senpai, thank you so much for your kanji sheets. Since there are so many, I'll go over them later and let you know if I have any questions! Thank you so so much both sushi-san and senpai you guys are so great and I've learned so much from you both!
漢和名手
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Posted 1/3/15
Let's see if I can answer everything without forgetting something-- if I do, remind me!

I'd say tones are somewhat difficult. To me, they were sort of like genders for nouns in French (or Spanish and others)-- a language concept that totally doesn't exist in my native English. I kind of had to make a special effort, therefore, to learn them. So, when learning the word, learn the tone along with it. After a while, you'll get used to concept of tones, and it'll become more natural. Fortunately, in Mandarin, the tones mostly do not change (which is unlike Taiwanese), and the rules about tone shifts are easy. One could pre-learn at least what the tones in Mandarin are. Beyond that, though, one just learns the tone (only one of four possible) for each particular character. (A few characters can have multiple tones possible, depending on usage, but that's actually rather rare in Mandarin.)

Simplified Chinese characters (简体字) used in Mainland China are more "simplified" or reduced down from Traditional Chinese characters (繁體字) than modern Japanese Kanji. Kanji uses some simplified forms, but not others. (e.g. 小說 or novel in Chinese (traditional) and Japanese (kanji). Simplified Chinese is 小说, note the change in the 言 radical.) The simplified characters may be easier to write, but I frankly myself prefer the traditional characters-- they're beautiful in a way! I think before WWII or so, the Japanese also used the full traditional Chinese characters as their kanji as well, and did their own simplification to the current modern kanji later on. The Chinese Communists formally enacted the Simplified Characters some time after they came into power in China, although at least some of the Simplified characters are pre-existing forms that derive from Chinese calligraphy or cursive-type writing, it seems to me (just a guess on my part from observation of similarities).


Chinese characters can be quite complex, and it perhaps isn't too surprising that the Chinese themselves have come up with short-hand or cursive-style writing to write the characters more quickly. As mentioned, I think some of the Simplified characters (as well as Kanji) derive at least in part from these short-hand forms. It takes some experience to be able to decipher these. I can read some of it (e.g. from my parents-- probably because with some repetition, I became used to their style), but that first example of yours, Ichibanx3, I've no idea what that says at all! Maybe if I stare at it long enough, and think about it...... (eh, forget it!). If I could actually see what was in that box for 99-cents, maybe I could guess it better? The second one is as the English translation says-- 廁所 直走左轉 (ce4suo3 zhi12zou2zuo2zhuan3).


Yes, 好 (hao3) is good in Chinese. 好味 can mean good tasting-- I sense one will see this latter combination more written than spoken. "Delicious" is commonly 好吃 hao3chi1.

先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 1/4/15
Wow, thank you so much for such a thorough answer, sushipathさん! Curiosity satiated :D

And hm, I reckon we're thinking alongside similar lines when it comes to writing. Although I was never particularly interested in more traditional forms of Kanji, I like to search characters for words which we usually write with kana due to their common usage (e.g. なぜ・何故). And even if we find these kanji forms extremely rare we don't have a 100% certainty that we'll never come across them. I have, while watching NGE (it was the word 何故). So I think that "going deeper", such as learning obsolete characters, does not hurt :)

Oh, and 先生, thank you for uploading the scan with stroke order - I've completely forgotten about that! Yes, I think that these rules should apply for Japanese kanji as well, although it might be possible that there are different stroke orders for individual characters (王, for instance). Is that correct?

Anyway, thank you both for everything and talk to you later,

おつかれさまでした!




漢和名手
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Posted 1/4/15
No problem. どう致しまして。

Oh, I just saw I forgot something after all. Yes, I do think Chinese grammar is much simpler than Japanese grammar. While there are things such as particles in Chinese, it's nothing like it is in Japanese. Chinese word order in sentences more or less follows subject-verb-object like in English. No noun declensions, and no verb conjugations.
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Thank you so much for your detailed explanation, Sushi-san! I really appreciate it so much!

Since mainland China uses simplified characters, is it safe to assume that the majority of Chinese speakers use only simplified forms on a daily basis? If that is so, I wonder why my class is going to focus only on the traditional forms, and not the simplified forms. I agree with you Sushi-san! I feel that even though the traditional forms are more intricate and have more strokes than the simplified forms, the traditional Chinese characters have a certain beauty to them!

Also, I’m sorry my pictures always upload horizontally– but I’m glad you were able to at least understand the majority of Chinese characters in the pictures! I’m at a total loss over that one picture too! The next time I go to the Chinese supermarket, I’ll make sure to take more pictures of handwriting examples, or of anything interesting I see! I’ll now attach this one picture I took a couple of months ago. Even though the box was all greasy, it really caught my eye because of the drawing. At first I didn’t know why someone drew a bull, but then I read the side of the box and saw that the product name was called “Bull Head” Brand Barbecue Sauce! I find it awesome that an employee drew this, and it wasn’t even a display, it was just near the corner of one aisle!



Senpai: I hope it doesn't bother you that Sushi-san and I have gone way off topic in your thread, and are speaking about Japanese! I just have one more question for Sushi-san: is there a great difference between the Mandarin version of Chinese and the Cantonese version?

Also, that’s great that Chinese grammar is easy! So the Chinese don't have a concept of feminine and masculine speech/particles like the Japanese feminine particle わ or the masculine particlesぜ andそ? And Chinese has no verb conjugations at all? Wow!

Senpai: I know, I feel like there are some exceptions to that stroke order rule like kanji 有. For this kanji, I believe you first write the vertical stroke than the horizontal stroke and then complete it with 月. Also, I forgot to say that if you like action/ “shoot ‘em up” gangster manga, then Black Lagoon is the series for you. It’s an okay series really, the only reason I read the manga was because I saw the anime! Once again, senpai, thank you so much for your kanji sheets! I finished going over them and I’m glad we’re done with numbers now and am really looking forward to the new Kanji!! That one sentence “Pizza is my wide’s specialty. Her spaghetti, though is like puke” really made me laugh!

I have a question: the police number in Japan, 110, is pronounced ひゃくとう not ひゃくじゅう? Also, do you know why the kanji for “multiplication table” is くく?Which, as we all know means nine, nine? Because when I learned multiplication in primary school, the highest number we did was 12 x 12. I’m sorry if this is a really ridiculous question, I’m just really curious! I never knew that the Kanji for Kyuushuu was “nine rivers” that’s awesome! I watch a weekly broadcast made by a guy who lives in the Kyuushuu province! There’s a kanji for department store (百貨店)?My teacher said department store is デパート. Which one do native speakers use more frequently? Also I love it how shredded vegetables literally is “one thousand cuts: 千切り”! Another question: we all know the cheer “Banzai” but I was wondering, does banzai actually translate into English?

I’m sorry all my thoughts in the above paragraph seem scrambled , I wrote them down as I was looking over your worksheets, senpai! As always, thank you so much for everything you contribute to the group! As a side note, does it bother you and Sushi-san that we three are the only ones who contribute? We have 80 members now and not even 1% of them contribute. This thread is my favorite thread on Crunchyroll and I've done everything to promote this group and our forum, I just wish more people would really contribute to our ongoing (and quote interesting) conversation!!!

I'll speak to you guys soon~

(I just want to inform you guys that I have a surgery on this Saturday, so next week I probably won't be able to talk much )
先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 1/5/15
こんにちは~

Hey, it's not a big problem that you've gone slightly off-topic - it's actually very interesting and I get to know a bit about Chinese as well Besides, it is kind of relevant since we're still talking about writing for the most part.

Anyway, as for the character 有, I'll have to admit that I have a vague idea about it's stroke order I mean, it's not a particularly difficult kanji to write but, you see, there is a trick to the "crooked cross"-like element in the left upper corner of the kanji. And that is, it's stroke order varies on the character. Let's take 左 (ひだり; "left") and 右 (みぎ; "right"). In the first character the horizontal stroke goes first, while in the second one it's the diagonal stroke. Just to assure you: I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm only pointing out that the differences in stroke order of seemingly the same elements of a character may be present within Japanese itself as well as between this language and Chinese.

I'm currently busying myself with one manga series and I don't watch much anime lately; still, thanks for recommendation, maybe I'll check it out someday!

As for "110", I know it's kind of weird but, frankly, that's just the way it is :| Not only the dictionary says so but our Japanese teacher (a native speaker) told us a bit about it so it's definitely ひゃくとおばん (also, please note that "ten" is とお, not とう).It must be one of this "mixed readings" I think I've mentioned in one lesson.
I've no faintest idea about why it's 九九 but, while trying to find the answer somewhere and failing on the way, I've found something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AJvshZmYPs It's a video where they use a method from Japan to multiply numbers - it's pretty neat!
And the character in 九州(きゅうしゅう), although resembling a river, is not a river (note the three dots between the strokes). It's something like "state" or "province", according to a dictionary.
And we're back to the "milk problem" I'd say デパート would be more frequent but only because I had デパート and not 百貨店 in the word list of my textbook. Truth be told, I've found out about 百貨店 only when I was preparing the sheet :/ Anyway, I think デパート is used more commonly nowadays. That's only a hunch.
The only "translation" of "Banzai" I can think of would be the literal one, namely "ten thousand years". Like most "big" numbers in Japanese, pretty much anything beyond a thousand or some would be considered close to infinite so I reckon it could also mean "eternity" or "forever". Not in just any context, obviously. It's a sort of a cheer, to it could be translated like: "May [sth] live/last/endure 10,000 years/forever" or something like that. Actually, it reminds me of a Polish birthday cheer "Sto lat", which literally means "100 years" and is used to wish someone a long life :)

And yes, it is quite annoying >3< Although with 80 members in the group, even one of them is more than one percent - I'm not going anywhere with this, just saying And while we may happen to be the most active contributors let's not forget that there are some people who also post quite frequently (Cloudさん, for instance), even if not on an everyday basis. Still, it's better than being left alone with the task of running the group, right? I recall trying to run a Wikia once, all by myself. Gave up even before people started coming in :c Anyway, don't worry. I'm sure we'll gain more active members eventually. The members' list hit 80 lately, after all!

Aw, and good luck with that. Is it something serious or just a formality to taken care of?

See you later, people~


漢和名手
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I suppose it may well be true the majority of Chinese language users today use Simplified Chinese-- but they're probably mostly in Mainland China with its billion-plus population. I think Traditional Chinese is still the standard in Taiwan and in Chinese expat communities around the globe. Also, once one learns the full complex Traditional forms, it's not too far a stretch to learn the Simplified forms later. I suspect going the other way would be much harder.

The characters, if rendered with Traditional Chinese, on that box are: Niútóu pái shā chá jiàng huòjià yǐ mǎn牛頭牌沙茶醬 貨架已滿. The box is written in Simplified Characters, and is rather cursive as well.

Mandarin and Cantonese are quite different-- probably relatively mutually unintelligible. If one happens to know both, one can probably sense the similarities between them. (I know very little if any Cantonese. Hearing it, I occasionally can pick out a few words, particularly if accompanied by a translation, but that's it.) However, knowing only one of them probably won't get you far in trying to understand the other without additional training.

Having only spent about 6 total weeks in my whole life in Japan on vacations, I'm no expert at all on what the natives do. Nonetheless, I definitely concur with MidorikaSatsu regarding the second character in Kyushu, and the literal meaning of banzai.
先生
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Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/9/15
こんいちは〜

Ooh senpai, I love your new avatar, it looks super cool, especially with the glasses! Congrats on finally getting above the 500 point level as well!

Yay I’m glad you’re not angry or anything for getting off topic! Getting off topic is a sign of having an active dialogue with our members, and plus it’s awesome to learn some facts about Chinese from Sushi-san!



And as for the character 有, I’ve attached a picture of it from my Kanji book, sorry it’s kind of blurry, it seems like whenever I take a close up picture my camera doesn't want to focus properly! Anyway, as you can see from the picture, it says that the vertical stroke goes first, then the horizontal stroke is second, which really confuses me because isn’t the rule for kanji characters that the horizontal stroke usually is the first stroke? And now that you mention it, I always get the stroke order for 左 and 右 confused because as you mentioned one of them uses the horizontal stroke first and the other uses the vertical stroke first! Ah crooked cross, why must you be so confusing!

What manga series are you reading senpai? I’m currently jumping around from series to series (right no I’m reading some vampire manga!) To change the subject, thank you for telling me about 110’s strange pronunciation and mentioning that it’s とお! That’s great to know, especially if someone is planning to visit Japan. So the romaji for it is: hyakutooban, is that correct?

This is so random, but I just got an email in French and even though I can’t speak French, thanks to Spanish I was able to understand/read all of the email! I only mentioned that because I was wondering if you know if Chinese speakers can understand/read Japanese due to Japan using a lot of Kanji?

About that multiplication style: wow! I’ve never seen anything like that, it was pretty cool to see how those lines can aid in multiplication! And oops I was thinking of川 (which means river, right?) and got it confused with 州. Sorry about that.

Haha our “milk problem”. Outsiders to this forum would be like “what’s a milk problem” It’s like our little inside joke! Though seriously, I wish there was someway we could poll native Japanese speakers on milk and department store. I think 百貨店 sounds cooler than デパート though. Oh yeah! did your Japanese teacher tell you about in department stores how they have an elevator girl whose job I to push the buttons for the customers? I think that’s really cool, like how their department stores are different than Western department stores! I would love to visit a Japanese department store one day!

Now that you mention Banzai meaning literally “ten thousand years,” that reminds me of something I read about Chinese yesterday: When someone sneezes twice, in Chinese they say “May you live for 10,000 years” . I hope I’m right about that, since I read it when I was really tired. Also that’s awesome about the Polish—both “Sto lat” and “Banzai” remind me of the Spanish Que viva___ or viva____ Which literally mean: “May ___live”, or simply: “long live____”

That’s true, there are a handful of people participating but still…. I’m not complaining though I’m just hoping we get some awesome people to join soon so we can have even more interesting conversations!

And my surgery on Saturday is going to be done by a Japanese oral surgeon, which is the only positive thing! To answer your question: it’s just a formality: my wisdom teeth are going to be extracted, all 4 at once. I’m super nervous about it. Is there anyone who has gone through the same procedure who can offer me some advice/comfort?

And Sushi-san that’s true, that learning Traditional characters first will be easier, I guess that answers my question! Thanks for the translation too! I guess Cantonese and Mandarin are like Spanish and Portuguese, while listening to spoken Portuguese, I can only pick out a few words too. It’s really awesome you went to Japan!!! Which part did you visit and what was the most memorable part of your vacations, if you don't mind me asking? I don’t really travel much, so that’s why I love hearing about other’s travel experiences
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今晩は~

Thanks I felt like changing it since Christmas is over QAQ At least now the avatar's gender matches with mine and the guy kinda looks like me (esp. the glasses). Great that you like it And wow, I don't even want to imagine just how long would it take me to earn all these points to create the thread on my own back then, not having mod's rights. I must thank you again <3

My sentiments exactly It's nice to have a lively discussion, especially since the guy who was supposed to run the thread (namely, me) is a lazy bum, though that's an understatement. I'm coming back to my dorm tomorrow and classes at the uni start again so I hope that once I'm back to the everyday routine I'll be able to do something more productive than slaughtering zombies or dogding thousands of bullets while wrecking tanks as a little girl on my PC. In short, it's great that you're here guys, keeping this thread alive.

As I said, there must be stroke order rules for individual characters. I don't know how the element in question works, it's beyond my knowledge. Perhaps we'll never know. What I know is to double-check the stroke order for every new character I learn and I am honestly surprised at times when I do so. Do you know how to write 心 (こころ; "heart, mind")? I would have never guessed you're supposed to start with the left-side stroke and then move on to the bottom one!

I believe I mentioned a manga called World Trigger. I found it quite by accident, while reading Weekly Shounen Jump I had got from my former Japanese teacher Anyway, instead of using English translations, as I usually do, I decided to continue reading the series in Japanese. It can be really tough at times, having to constantly look up words in a dictionary but also incredibly fun at the same time And the story is quite interesting. Other titles whose releases I'm following are: Bleach, Jojolion, UQ Holder, One-Punch Man and The Gamer (technically a manhwa or sth like that; it's Korean, anyway). I'm also occasionally reading some Touhou doujins.

Yes, it would be "hyakutooban". I wonder why it is this way myself but hey: it's not even the weirdest thing about Japanese language or Japan itself :)

You know, my former roommate had asked me once whether once I master Japanese then I would be able to speak Chinese as well. My take on this is that by following the same logic I may say I know Finnish pretty well since both Polish and Finnish use Latin script. And I don't know a word in Finnish. I'll agree, of course, that knowledge of characters of either Japanese or Chinese would, to some extent, improve your knowledge of the characters of another. We must remember, however, that both the Japanese and the Chinese have developed their own characters over time; moreover, there are discrepancies between meanings of the same kanji/hanji depending on the langauge and finally - the grammar and word formation rules may be different. I'm not sure about the last one but I remember seeing a word (I don't remember what is was, though; it was in some textbook) written in several languages, including Japanese and Chinese. The characters used were the same in both words, although they were "mirrored".

Isn't that cool? Too bad it gets rather messy with numbers with digits past 5, but it's pretty neat nevertheless. And don't worry about that - everyone makes mistakes. And yes, 川(かわ)stands for "river".

Let's call it a 牛問 (from 題; ぎゅうにゅうもんだい; "milk problem"). Jk Anyway, I saw 百貨店 while reading today's news, it was in a name of some department store; but again, the article itself referred to such stores as デパート. So while we can't have any reliable source of info, I'd risk the claim that デパート is more often used. And no, I did not know about what Japanese department stores are like Yeah, it's definitely different from ours.

We're getting members almost on a daily basis, we'll be fine I'd say we're doing good for a group that had started not so long ago, wouldn't you agree?

Oh, the dentist .__. Good thing it's nothing serious but, since it's a dentist, it might be a bit unpleasant. I have 2 wisdom teeth in the jaw but I haven't had them extracted (yet). Can't tell you what to expect, sorry Everything will go fine, though!

So anyway, apart from struggling with the numbers chart, I think I'll need to prepare a little bit of explanation as for as the stuff we've covered so far but that haven't been discussed in detail. Let's just hope I don't forget to do so >_<

I made it into quite a lengthy post: good, it may be a sign of returning to normal

また明日ねぇ~
漢和名手
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Posted 1/6/15
Oh well, I guess I'm going to disregard my own advice here! I looked in my kanji dictionary, which has stroke order charts, and indeed, the first stroke for the "crooked cross" element differs between characters as you've all mentioned. I never knew! However, I've been writing all those characters, 左右有 etc. with the horizontal stroke first now for many many years, and it looks fine (people tell me I've pretty good penmanship for a foreigner), and so I'm not about to change now. So there!

Knowing Chinese does help quite a bit in at least interpreting a Japanese word, phrase, or sentence-- at least making a decent guess as to its meaning-- if they use sufficient kanji. It has helped me beyond my meager Japanese abilities when I've gone to Japan-- I can read quite a few signs and such, even if I can't pronounce it correctly as a Japanese person might. It helps a lot in learning Japanese too as Japanese has a lot of borrowed words from Chinese. Having already gotten over that learning curve, kanji is not all that difficult for me-- it's Japanese grammar that really stumps me. However, I think your analogy about Polish and Finnish is quite apt, Satsu-san. Knowing Chinese gets you very little to nothing when it comes to actually speaking or reciting Japanese, or communicating in Japanese.

Without going on and on too long, I've been to Japan three times in my life, each time for about two weeks (1993, 2007, 2010). The first time was with my mom, and the last two times was by myself. I've been to Tokyo, Kyoto, Hakone, Hiroshima, Takayama, and Mt. Fuji, to sum up the major sites I've visited. With wife and two babies now, it's going to be a while before I travel internationally again, but I hope to do so-- maybe when the kids are old enough to enjoy it. At this point, I'd like to hit the more off-the-track places I've not yet seen-- Hokkaido, Tohoku region, Shikoku and Kyushu, maybe even Okinawa (I don't like really hot tropical weather, though). Somehow, I don't think I'll ever get tired of visiting there! I really like independent travel-- going at one's own pace and schedule-- but that requires bit more homework, and it of course helps if one knows at least a little of the language and such. I use an agency to arrange hotels and major transit between cities and such beforehand, but do the rest on my own. I actually want to visit Poland one day too, but I'll very likely go on a bus tour for that-- I know absolutely zero of Polish language or much of Eastern Europe in general, and so would be utterly and completely lost if on my own. Among my most memorable experiences in Japan: watching sumo all day in during the 2007 Aki Basho in the A-section box seats; attemping to summit Mt. Fuji starting from the very base (not the 5th Station)-- made it just past the 8th station, but turned back in the blizzard-like snow; the @home maid café in Akihabara-- kitschy but quite fun; eating Japanese food every meal of every day (can't over emphasize how great this was-- eating local cuisine is a particular highlight of travelling for me); staying at a traditional ryokan in Takayama; dressing up like a samurai at the Toei Uzamasa Eigamura in Kyoto and having the Japanese visitors to the park actually ask to take pictures of me!
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Posted 1/7/15 , edited 1/7/15
こんにいちは〜

I really do like your new avatar since the guy in your avatar looks so cool! It’s awesome you choose an avatar who looks like you! (You wear glasses too, senpai? ) If I were to choose an avatar who looks like me, I’d choose Asuna from SAO since her hair color and eye color are so similar to mine. I’d love to one day cosplay as her but I’m too cheap to buy a whole SAO outfit, especially since I’m saving my money to buy a custom tailored Chinese dress! You’re the best mod ever!フフ〜

I really am happy to have you help me with running this club! Good luck with your studies! Now that you mention killing zombies, you’re a gamer? I’m the worst at video games, since I’ve never owned a single video game system or anything in my whole life. It all started in 2000/2001, I don’t know if you remember this, but the Game Boy (and I think the Game Boy Color or whatever it was called) was really popular and all my classmates seemed to have one. All I remember about the Game Boy was those bulky cartridges. Anyway, when you’re a little kid you naturally want to have the same thing your classmates have, so I wanted a Game Boy too, but to make a long story short I saved my money and was cheap even back then and decided not to buy one and that’s why to this day I like know nothing about video games! (I hope you don’t think less of me because I’m not a gamer) 

Yeah I actually knew the stroke order for 心 since it was one of the first kanji I learned, but the same word with the line through it (I’m sorry I can’t type it because I don’t remember its reading—I have way too much jumbled up kanji in my head!) has a different stroke order than 心 which is just annoying!

It’s really great that you’re reading manga in Japanese! At times seeing so much kanji all over the pages dissuades me from even trying to read in Japanese—that’s why I say Yotsubato is the perfect manga for beginners, and I have almost all the books in the series! I have so much manga in Japanese, I wish I could lend them to you, though I don’t know if you’d like my tastes in manga since I tend to like dark stories, romances, historical like samurai stories, etc. If you want to check out my manga list I’ve composed so far, you can click this link:

http://myanimelist.net/mangalist/Ichibanx3

Do you see any series in my lists that you like? Like you, I love Bleach, it was the first manga I was serious about! Hell, Ichigo Kurosaki is one of my all time favorite characters! And oh! I was thinking about reading One Punch Man, is it a good series?

Is Polish similar to any other European languages though? Because Spanish and Portuguese are similar, as well as Finnish and Swedish. (Now that you mention Finnish, the only word I know is hyvää, which means “happy” I think—I swear the most random words in foreign languages stick in my head!)

Instead of 牛問 we should so shorten it and give it a katakana name how about “Mirupuro” ミルプロ for “Milk problem” because I think ミルプロ sounds so cool!  Wait…does ミルプロ actually mean anything in Japanese? It’ll be our inside “joke”. Now that you mention デパート I was watching an anime today and they mentioned デパート so I guess デパート really is the more frequent word!

You’re right senpai—pretty soon we’re going to reach 100 members and for a group that’s almost 2 months old, that’s a pretty good statistic!

Are your wisdom teeth bothering you? Mine feel like someone’s constantly sticking their thumb in my jaw, it’s a weird sensation. And normally I hate doctors/ the dentist but I really like the oral surgeon who is going to perform the surgery since he is Japanese and super nice! Like when I thanked him in Japanese he bowed to be and shook my hand at the same time! (Do Japanese people do that to foreigners—like bow and shake hands at the same time?) Unfortunately, I’m so not looking forward to Saturday! I can't believe it’s already Wednesday and that Saturday is going to come so quick. The part I’m super nervous about is when he cuts into my gums since it’ll be the first time someone will cut into me and all the blood too! :(

Yeah Sushi-san isn’t the crooked-cross strokes so annoying! It seems like there’s no rhyme nor reason behind certain crooked crosses. I guess it just depends on the Kanji character. I have such bad penmanship! Oh that reminds me, do you guys know if fan art should be submitted in ink or pencil? Since I’m submitting a character design to Jump Comics/ Shonen Jump and I don’t know if I’m supposed to draw the character in pencil or ink.

Wow Sushi-san thanks for sharing your adventures with us! It’s awesome you went to Japan in 1993—the year I was born! Do you remember anything about how Japan was in 1993? I hope to one day be as lucky as Sushi-san and visit Japan! I vicariously visit Japan every week through watching Nabecchi-san’s broadcast as he drives to various places. You guys might want to check out his videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/nabecchi1983

How was the maid café? I so want to visit a host club one day! But I’m worried that the guys who work there would be sleezy. And that’s right, you should take your kids to Japan when they’re at age that they’ll remember it for the rest of their live. Like in 1997, when I was 4 my parents and I went to Washington D.C. for vacation and I don’t remember much from that trip, the only thing I remember was that my dad got lost and drove around the Lincoln memorial 3 times! Now that you mention local cuisine, it’s my dream to visit a family owned tofu manufacturing facility or tofu shop in Japan since I absolutely love tofu! Did you eat any yummy tofu dishes while in Japan?

Wow! I'm exhausted from typing so much! Haha

また明日ね〜
漢和名手
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Posted 1/7/15
I've really zero artistic ability, and so have never even thought to submit anything like that to a magazine. If we relate it to submitting manuscripts to a scientific journal (something I do know a bit about), journals typically have fairly specific guidelines for submissions ("Guidelines for Authors" and such, which can dictate font sizes, margins, sizes of photos and etc..), and one generally should adhere to them-- you're appealing to them for consideration, after all, and not the other way around. Hopefully Jump somewhere on a website or something will have a link to their specific guidlines.

In 1993, I went in the mid-summer and it was very hot and humid! We saw mostly traditional tourist things then (Meiji shrine, Tokyo Tower, Imperial Palace)-- it was a guided bus tour. Back then, I didn't especially like Japanese food, and had no knowledge of anime or whatever-- we had a summer trip coming (might have been a reward for surviving the first two years of medical school), I got to pick the destination, and I somehow decided on Japan for whatever reason which I can no longer remember. I remember liking the trip, but not too much else. I think we got bumped up to business class on the flight there, which was quite nice-- roomy for an airplane! I remember the very long trip from Narita Airport to Tokyo, which is still the case today. I remember asking whether actual swords could be purchased as souvenirs, and being told essentially no.

My more recent trips are more memorable, being more recent, and also self-directed-- I went exactly where I wanted. I'm a carnivore, and especially love seafood, so I aimed for that mostly. For me, tofu is but a mere side dish-- sorry! I've no direct experience with host or hostess clubs! :-) I'm assuming we're talking about the places, like in Kabukicho, where beautiful women (or men) ply you with conversation and exhorbitantly priced drinks as they empty your wallet-- possibly run by yakuza. Other services might also be available for those willing to pay. I frankly wouldn't go near anything like this. Now, maid cafes and butler cafes are nothing like this. They're generally cute, kitschy, and clean-- and a lot less expensive. When I went, there was a Y700 cover for an hour, plus food and drinks (usual cafe-type fare, and only slightly overpriced). You can chat with "your" maid (a few can speak English-- "my" maid was actually an English major at a local college) or play some table games for tokens and prizes. The cafe was also airconditioned, which was great (also went in mid-summer in 2010 to climb Mt. Fuji, so again fairly hot and humid at sea level). Majority of customers were men, but I saw mixed couples and women/girls come in too. They supposedly have shows too with the maids singing and such, but none were happening when I was there. I hear in butler cafes, they'll serve fine cakes and pastries on fine tableware, and give you a tiara to wear (if you're female). Again, cute, kitschy, and clean-- consider it a minor fantasy, and it's all just a game. The maid cafes actually have very strict rules-- you cannot touch the maids at all, not even to shake her hand. I imagine they have to keep the creeps at bay or else it could get out of hand.

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Posted 1/8/15
今晩は~

Yeah, I've been wearing glasses for a couple of years - I guess it's the innumerable amount of books and games that had eventually started to take its toll on my eyes. My choice of the avatar was very spontaneous - I simply stumbled upon a doujin manga panel with this guy by pure accident and thought it would do after some colouring. The hairstyle's slightly different than mine, though, and, truth be told, I haven't had a shave in a while :|
Asuna, huh? Mhm, nice And yeah, I guess cosplaying can be quite expensive, especially when the character has some fancy outfit. I've just checked some random cosplay costumes website and they want like 50USD for some brooches O_o I'd love to cosplay as Dio Brando (Jojo's Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders) some day but the only part of the costume I have right now is my own hair ._.
And a Chinese dress? Wow, that must be something. And prolly pricey, too.

Yeah, whether it's for better or for worse, I am a gamer. The reason I'm saying that is because it can gobble up a great deal of my time when I'm not keeping check on the clock. Otherwise, it's super fun (and frustrating at times). Anyway, I might know Game Boy but I don't think it was so popular over here in Poland when I was a kid; I didn't have it, for once. What was extremely popular, though, was the Pegasus console (basically a NES clone). I wish I still had it - oh, the nostalgia. And easy there, I do realise that there are lots of people who don't play games at all but I see no reason to discriminate them in any way. We might like different things but that's all there is to it :)

You're talking about 必, present in 必ず (かならず; "certainly"), for instance. And yeah, I just looked the stroke order of it up and it's like a blow that devastated all I believed in so far. Just exaggerating, but it's damn annoying! Even the radical is the same (I think so) for these two kanji, so what's going on?

The main reason that keeps me reading (apart from a good story) is that I can practice the language this way, which is incredibly handy as I kill two birds with one stone - both fun and useful! And I even remembered some new words; too bad there's furigana for pretty much every kanji. It makes it super easy for checking words in a dictionary but it can also be a distraction keeping you from actually reading kanji. Unless the kanji get really blurry due to the font or bad image quality, then it's a plus.

I've checked your list (and now I'm inspired to create my own) and while I can't see anything I know beyond major titles like Bleach, Death Note, FMA, etc., I was positively surprised to see that you've read both Love Hina and Mahou Sensei Negima! Love Hina was the first manga series I've read, you know, it's kinda special to me; and I've really enjoyed MSN as well, loved to see the same art style. Oh, and did you know about UQ Holder? It's basically somewhat like a sequel to Mahou Sensei Negima; if you're interested (and I think you could be, seeing how big a score you gave MSN) you might want to check it out

Bleach was my first shounen from the "great trio" (beside One Piece and Naruto) and I think I can say that I've come to like it the most out of the three. I'm still reading it but the plot has seen its better days, in my opinion. And yes, One-Punch Man is quite enjoyable to read; although, there are only about 60 chapters currently available and the releases can take time. The art style is quite neat and some chapters have its pages drawn as though they were individual frames from an animation - there are even GIFs of these on the Internet, you can check these out as they're pretty cool.

Polish is quite similar to other Slavic languages like Czech, Slovakian, Russian or Ukrainian (possibly more). And yeah, I guess it's quite easy for a foreigner to mistake Spanish and Portuguese, they're very similar. The only way I can differentiate between these is when I see a 'ç'. You don't have a letter like this in Spanish, right?

As far as I know, ミルプロ should be meaningless (unless we take IME's suggestion and consider it to mean 'a professional in looking [at things]' - 見るプロ), so we can use it as we see fit, I guess.

I don't think that my wisdom teeth have ever been a cause of any serious problems. From what I know from an X-ray , they're growing in a weird direction (horizontally O_o) but as I'm saying, they've never bothered me, thankfully. And oh, I didn't know the Japanese do that. I mean, if they usually do. I don't know any besides my teacher so I can't tell As for the dentist - I know just how nervous I'd be in a situation like this and I know that it would be useless to try and tell you that you shouldn't think about it too much. I know you will anyway :| But at least try to see the bright side, that once it's over the problem will be gone. You'll be fine :)

Wow, a character design? That's so cool! Sadly, I've no clue about whether it should be ink or pencil. What sort of character is that? What style does he/she fit in?

And darn, I'm so jealous! I hope I'll pay a visit to Japan one day too. As for when that's going to be, it might depend on whether my dumb university finally decides to start some sort of cultural exchange with Japan. Since the positive outcome is unlikely, it might take some time for me to go there but it's definitely a part of a long-term plan. Thank you for sharing your experiences with us, sushipathさん!

Now, as for the promised 'numbers' lesson, it might have to wait for now. Turns out I'll have quite a deal of work to do throughout the next 3 weeks (not to mention the Jan 28th - Feb 10th period, when the exam session starts) and with one half of the day consumed by classes and the other one - by homework, revision and swotting, little time for anything else remains. And I need some time to recharge mental batteries as well, so as a result, the lesson will be considerably delayed. I kindly ask for your understanding.

Of course, I'll still try to answer to whatever posts I see here - I'm not ceasing my activity 100%.

That's it for now, see you all later~

また明日ねぇ~
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