Why is it always homophobe and not homodiscriminator?
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Posted 12/9/14 , edited 12/9/14
Or hate crime?

Or hands up if you're afraid of Hardgay.

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Posted 12/9/14
Hardgay as in that Japanese comedian/ex wrestler? he's actually not gay but, am i afraid of him? i don't know, seems like a nice guy.

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Posted 12/9/14 , edited 12/9/14
Well, I'm not actually sure the term requires refinement since the thing it is supposed to be identifying (prejudicial thinking and/or behavior toward homosexuals in one form or another on the basis of sexual orientation) is well-understood as is. However, simply using the term "prejudiced" serves just as well if you want to avoid the whole "I'm not afraid of homosexuals" discussion.

A hate crime, meanwhile, is a crime which is demonstrated to have been motivated either primarily or exclusively by the victim's status as a member of a protected class. For example, committing a homicide against someone of a different ethnic background is insufficient to warrant treatment of the homicide as a hate crime on its own. It would first be necessary to show that the ethnicity of the victim was a motivating factor.
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Posted 12/9/14
It is as BlueOni says. The definition of the word "homophobic" is well understood by almost everyone at this point in time and trying to change that just won't do. People could always use other words to mean something similar to disliking homosexuals, such as maybe "bigot" or just "rude". However, I believe one should be able to feel however they please without fear of being labeled a nasty word because of other peoples' inane desire to be "politically correct" and not step on anyone's toes, be they complete stranger or close friend.
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Posted 12/9/14 , edited 12/9/14

NaotoShirogane1525 wrote:

It is as BlueOni says. The definition of the word "homophobic" is well understood by almost everyone at this point in time and trying to change that just won't do. People could always use other words to mean something similar to disliking homosexuals, such as maybe "bigot" or just "rude". However, I believe one should be able to feel however they please without fear of being labeled a nasty word because of other peoples' inane desire to be "politically correct" and not step on anyone's toes, be they complete stranger or close friend.


The flip side, of course, is that homosexuals should be able to interact with their associates, friends, coworkers, and loved ones without concern that language which has a well-known history of being abusive, discriminatory, and incisive will be used. Either way the trick is to simply know and respect one another. Don't be afraid of the language you use, but respect peoples' boundaries if they say that a particular word or phrase offends them (within reason, of course). Simply stating that the word "hamburger" offends you and insisting that it should be replaced with "bovine meat sandwich" is not at all like my asking not to be called a "dyke", for example.
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Posted 12/9/14

BlueOni wrote:


NaotoShirogane1525 wrote:

It is as BlueOni says. The definition of the word "homophobic" is well understood by almost everyone at this point in time and trying to change that just won't do. People could always use other words to mean something similar to disliking homosexuals, such as maybe "bigot" or just "rude". However, I believe one should be able to feel however they please without fear of being labeled a nasty word because of other peoples' inane desire to be "politically correct" and not step on anyone's toes, be they complete stranger or close friend.


The flip side, of course, is that homosexuals should be able to interact with their associates, friends, coworkers, and loved ones without concern that language which has a well-known history of being abusive, discriminatory, and incisive will be used. Either way the trick is to simply know and respect one another. Don't be afraid of the language you use, but respect peoples' boundaries if they say that a particular word or phrase offends them (within reason, of course). Simply stating that the word "hamburger" offends you and insisting that it should be replaced with "bovine meat sandwich" is not at all like my asking not to be called a "dyke", for example.


You're right.
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