First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next  Last
Post Reply Learning Resources
先生
5476 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 2/18/15
Thanks for reminding me about that series Ditto-san! I totally forgot about it! (And with my birthday coming up maybe I can add it to my list of gifts, which is blank right now because I don't know what I want for my birthday!) I find it interesting how the Series in English is called "Japanese in Mangland" but the Spanish version is called "Japonés en viñetas" which literally means "Japanese in vignettes" (which sounds strange in English ) I remember looking at this series in the bookstore but ultimately choosing the book, "Japanese the Manga Way". This book is just amazing and I have learned so much from it!
百芸
79755 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 2/27/15
Does anyone have any favorite books or text books that they like using?
漢和名手
60486 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 2/27/15
If one can take a real class (i.e. one with some real rigor, not just for introduction or vacationers) or afford a private tutor, I'd say by all means do that. For a self-studier like me (no time to take a class), I really did like "Japanese for Everyone." It seems to give a pretty good beginning foundation within the covers of a single book, is not very expensive at all, and is pretty rigorous-- you're made to learn kana right away, and Romaji is ditched completely after the 3rd lesson. I wouldn't use it as purely a stand-alone, though, either. My own study with that text was supplemented by dictionaries, as well as a series of grammar handbooks by Kodansha (e.g. one, or actually two I have, on particles, another on verbs, another on adjectives and adverbs, another on sentence patterns). For keigo, I have a book from Tuttle. I also arranged on my own to have a conversation partner who was a student at the local University-- to make sure what I was learning actually was more or less correct. All these books use essentially the same Romaji system (if/when Romaji is used) and grammatical terms, and so they're all mutually compatible, as it were. I mention this because I also inherited "501 Japanese Verbs" from my mom, who took Japanese years ago-- this book uses a seemingly rather non-standard (even unique) Romaji system, and no kana or kanji, as well as grammatical terms that seem largely borrowed from Western European language concepts that don't apply well to Japanese. I really don't recommend that latter book.

A notable detraction for "Japanese for Everyone" is that it's somewhat dated, even in its revised version. Scenarios and vocabulary are definitely pre-Internet era (back when word processors were stand-alone machines, and disco was popular music...). The revisions of the revised edition also are occasionally haphazardly implemented (e.g. the word 携帯電話 was introduced without explanation). It also introduces kanji without really teaching one how to write them properly. Coming with a background of Chinese, this wasn't a problem for me, but writing kanji is hardly intuitive for those without any background.
芭蕉の化身
18643 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / Ireland
Offline
Posted 2/28/15
HEADS UP!
Don't know if everyone's already aware but this week's (~4 days left right now) weekly Humble Bundle is Japanese themed!
Link to Humble Bundle: https://www.humblebundle.com/weekly

In case you didn't know, the Humble Bundle is a set of games available for purchase together at whatever price you choose (if you pay above certain thresholds you get more games).
Can't speak for all of the games as I haven't tried most of 'em yet but the one that caught my eye was Influent.
(permalink for after Humble ends: http://playinfluent.com/)

Influent is a language learning game, almost like an interactive dictionary. You walk around and "collect" translations of object names by clicking. It's got a really nice interface and it seems to have a reasonably sized vocab list. Each time you click an object or word, you'll hear the pronunciation of it too, which is really neat. You can add words to lists and test yourself in order to earn stars. The stars can then be spent towards unlocking verbs related to the nouns you've collected. Beyond this, I'm not sure as I literally installed it 10 minutes ago to check it out. Also, for Japanese, you can flick between kanji, hiragana and romaji at any time.

Oh! And it appears to run with no problems whatsoever on my ~6 year old piece of junk laptop so I wouldn't worry too much about system requirements.

If you buy the Humble Bundle, you'll get one language pack for Influent and at least two other games. Obviously I went for Japanese but you can buy additional language packs ($5 each) for Mandarin, Spanish, Korean, Latin and more. They're got lists of languages on the website both available and planned (the latter including Polish and Irish, you might be interested to know).

Anyway, thought I'd share this since it's going cheap right now and seems pretty good. My own Japanese vocabulary is in dire need of some broadening and this seems like a fun way to do it. If you like learning words and clicking things-

-you might like to check this out!
先輩(Moderator)
1245 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Poland
Offline
Posted 3/1/15
I've got to say that it didn't take long for me to purchase the bundle Thanks for letting us know about this! I'm currently dowloading one of the games but I love it already
先生
5476 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 3/2/15
I know I said this a million times but Japanese the Manga Way is really an amazing book. It taught me the basics of grammar points and thanks to it, I went into Japanese 1 and Japanese 2 with a stronger background of Japanese than the majority of my classmates (though I don't know as much Japanese as some members in my group here--you guys are truly amazing! ) Here's the Amazon link if you guys want to check it out: http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Manga-Way-Illustrated-Structure/dp/1880656906/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425351643&sr=8-1&keywords=japanese+the+manga+way

anyway, thank you for your recommendations Sushi-san and Cloud-san! This is random but does anyone know of any resources (preferably a book) where it shows you the Japanese kanji pronunciations along with the Chinese Pinyin pronunciations? Because such a resource will be extremely helpful to me as I am studying both Mandarin and Japanese at the same time
漢和名手
60486 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 3/2/15
Both Japanese kana and Chinese pinyin in a single source? I don't think I've ever seen that. I'm going to guess that you might have to go overseas for a source, and find something like a Chinese-Japanese dictionary.

Actually, here on Amazon-Japan is such a book!

プログレッシブ トライリンガル 中日英・日中英辞典
ISBN-10: 4095066121
ISBN-13: 978-4095066127

This is apparently a Chinese-Japanese-English dictionary, and the description specifically states that kana and pinyin are both included! If you're lucky, maybe your local Kinokuniya or similar bookstore might carry something like this.
先生
5476 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 3/3/15
Wow who would've thought that there is a trilingual dictionary in Chinese-Japanese-English!!! Thank you so much for finding this dictionary Sushi-san! I only asked the question because in my Kanji book, in parenthesis the author gives the pronunciation of each Kanji character, which is a really great idea, but apparently it doesn't help me at all because he uses the "Wade system of Romanization" not Pinyin. I don't even understand how the Wade system works. Do you Sushi-san? Here's an example from the Kanji book so you can see what I'm talking about:



I'm sorry if it's slightly blurry and crooked, Crunchyoll always uploads my pictures sideways
百芸
79755 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 3/3/15
That looks like "Essential Kanji" by P.G. O'Neill. :)
漢和名手
60486 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 3/3/15
I'm not intimately familiar with the Wade-Giles system. It's an older system to which I was exposed only through an older Chinese dictionary I happen to have from childhood years and Chinese school from that time. The vast majority of my Chinese education to date was from college and afterwards, where we used the Hanyu Pinyin system I mentioned earlier. (BTW, "Pinyin" as a word is just "Romanization." So, Wade-Giles is a pinyin system, and the currently popular Hanyu Pinyin is another one.)

Anyway, Wade-Giles, as best as I can gather, is still pretty similar to Hanyu Pinyin for the most part. From the photo you posted, you can see some of the main differences. Hanyu Pinyin uses diacritics to note the tones, but Wade-Giles uses numerals-- however, since diacritics are a pain to type, I usually borrow that one element from Wade-Giles when typing, including for this message. Another thing-- note the character 表. This is "biao3" in pinyin-- pronounced with an un-aspirated "b" sound in the beginning. In Wade-Giles, the unaspirated "b" sound is written with a "p," and the aspirated "p" sound ("p" is an aspirated "b" sound) is written with an apostrophe to note the aspiration-- so p' (e.g. the character 票, not in your photo, is written p'iao4 in Wade-Giles, but only piao4 in Hanyu Pinyin). This use of the apostrophe also occurs with the two bottom characters in the photo 争,乘. In Hanyu Pinyin, these two characters are written zheng1 and cheng2 respectively, but are cheng1 and ch'eng2 in Wade-Giles. Noting aspirated and unaspirated consonant pairs with apostrophes may thrill linguists, but I think it confuses the rest of us mere mortals, and my guess is that this may have contributed to Hanyu Pinyin taking over for Wade-Giles in language instruction these days.

Another weird thing about Wade-Giles: the "r" sound in Chinese is inexplicably (as far as I can tell anyway) rendered as a "j" in Wade-Giles. So, 巫人 or wizard, sorceror is wu1 jen2, or if one omits the tones, wu-jen in Wade-Giles. I recall deadpanditto making a D&D reference on the group's Wall-- Wu-Jen is the name of the old wizard class for players of Advanced D&D Oriental Adventures. In Hanyu Pinyin, the word is wu1 ren2, which seems to me much more intuitive in terms of rendering the pronounciation-- in Hanyu Pinyin, things are more spelled like they sound.

Some rendering of diphthongs or combined vowels also differs between the two systems as well.
先生
5476 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 3/6/15 , edited 3/6/15
Ditto-san! Yup that book is Essential Kanji! Do you also own it?

Thank you so much for your explanation Sushi-san! I'll just ignore the Wade system in that Kanji book so it doesn't confuse me, and so I don't wind up mispronouncing any words in Chinese class! I just have one question: is the Chinese "r" sound similar to the Japanese "r" sound?
126 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 3/6/15
hi
漢和名手
60486 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 3/6/15
I sense that the Chinese "r" and the Japanese "r" are slightly different, but it's hard to describe exactly how so. Briefly looking at articles on Japanese and Chinese phonology, it seems the two sounds are different-- represented by different symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet-- but beyond that, when trying to read the phonology jargon, I've absolutely positively no clue what they heck they're saying!

At least for the Mandarin Chinese "r," the tongue is rolled back somewhat to make the sound. It seems to me for the Japanese "r," the tongue tends to stay forwards, towards the lips.
先輩(Moderator)
1245 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Poland
Offline
Posted 3/7/15
I don't intend to claim to be an expert in the field of phonology but I might know just enough of the lingo to interpret it, who knows Could I ask for the link to the article?

I've no idea about Chinese 'r', but at least one variety of Japanese 'r' could be something similar to [ɾ], or the so called alveolar flap. [ɾ] is a sound you produce when uttering such words as city - assuming that you are a speaker of American English. It sounds somewhat close to 'd', doesn't it?
漢和名手
60486 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 3/7/15
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Chinese_phonology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_phonology

Just the standard Wikipedia articles.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.