First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next  Last
Post Reply Learning Resources
先生
5467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 5/6/15 , edited 5/6/15
Thanks for the link, that looks pretty cool! I wish the local Kumon here offered Japanese! What aspect of Japanese are they teaching you at Kumon? That would be so convenient since it's a short walk from my house! I think you are the only member in this group who is currently residing in Japan, which is awesome~ I noticed that the Kumon in Japan also teaches [penmanship and calligraphy! Man, I'm so jealous, I wish I could take classes there!
百芸
79737 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 5/7/15
Penmanship and calligraphy would be cool!
先生
5467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 5/7/15
Yeah I agree! If anyone in the group is taking/have taken Japanese penmanship or calligraphy classes, please share your experiences with us!
漢和名手
59482 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 5/7/15
I've actually taken calligraphy classes twice, though not to much effect. The first was in Taiwan more than 20 years ago, part of a summer camp of sorts. Very little actual instruction took place, so I didn't learn much of anything-- but I did acquire a decent brush, ink stone, and ink (a stick of dark material, which one rubs into water in the ink stone to actually make liquid ink) from the course. The second was some years later during graduate school (one got to take one course outside one's field each semester-- so I took Chinese). Here, we were taught in Li style (an older writing style, 隸書), which has more straight lines-- perhaps easier than the standard style currently used (楷書). We also were able to actually carve our own name seals!

I retain almost nothing from those classes, frankly. All I can say is that writing with a brush is very very different than writing with any sort of pen or pencil that we're all used to using. I think it's very difficult-- a lot more subtle movements required to make the lines come out right, and I never really ever got the hang of it. Once I asked my dad, though, and despite not having written with a brush in over 50 years at that time when I asked him, he was still able to do it without much effort! Maybe once one learns it successfully, it's like riding a bike, as it were...? I don't know if kids are made to do it nowadays, but back then in Taiwan, it was a standard drill to learn to write with a brush.
先生
5467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 5/8/15
Wow Sushi-san! That experience sounds amazing, thanks for sharing it ~ How was it carving your own name seal? When I was in a Japanese store I once saw blank stones and utensils for carving your own name seal. I was really interested in making my own seal, but I had no idea about how to go about doing it so I didn't buy the seal carving materials Luckily, I ordered my own personal seal from a master seal carver based in the Guangdong province! I'm not going to share the picture of my seal because knowing how amazing you are at reading seal script, you'll figure out my real name from the seal. I took a lot of time to decide the Hanzi I wanted to represent my name, since Western names don't translate that well into Chinese. I didn't want to go for the sound-for-sound approach because I think throwing together a bunch of random phonetic characters to represent Western names is kind of silly. What I did decide on was going for characters that symbolize the origin of my name. Ex: say if I wanted to have my first name carved (usually it's the last name that's carved into the name seal, right?) and if my first name were Jasmine, I would find the hanzi character that represented Jasmine and request that for my name seal. Was that a good idea, to have the symbolic meaning of my name instead of the phonetic pronunciation of my name for my name seal?
漢和名手
59482 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 5/9/15
The teacher provided the tools, and any student who wanted to carve a seal could buy a blank that the teacher brought with him (which I think he got from a Chinatown somewhere). I think most of the students carved in standard characters, but since I had my seal script book available for reference, I carved actual seal script. The stone for the seals is somewhat soft, and so carving wasn't physically too difficult-- it just required some patience and perhaps attention to detail. The tool was like an awl, if I recall-- just draw on the seal surface your design, and scratch away. We did it more simply-- carving the characters into the stone. More professional seals have the characters as raised projections above the background. The name seals usually have one's full name, last and first (or a pen-name, as we saw earlier). Some will also have the character 印 at the end too,

As for one's name, I suppose one could do it any number of ways. Most of us in Chinese and calligraphy classes were ethnically of Chinese origin, and so we came with names already given, as it were. For non-Asian students, if one's name happened to have a meaning, one could use that meaning translated into Chinese. Some will instead have something that phonetically resembles their own name (ideally also with a good meaning in Chinese-- a beginner student will want to have a teacher's help in choosing good words). Of course, also, given the rare opportunity in life to actually choose one's own name from scratch, one could just choose whatever one likes too! The only practical limitation might be choice of last name, which in Chinese (as in probably any other culture) are limited to a particular subset of words/characters.
学生
8341 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
19 / M / 堺市
Offline
Posted 5/10/15

Ichibanx3 wrote:

Thanks for the link, that looks pretty cool! I wish the local Kumon here offered Japanese! What aspect of Japanese are they teaching you at Kumon? That would be so convenient since it's a short walk from my house! I think you are the only member in this group who is currently residing in Japan, which is awesome~ I noticed that the Kumon in Japan also teaches [penmanship and calligraphy! Man, I'm so jealous, I wish I could take classes there!


When I enrolled at Kumon, they gave me this large paper:
http://i.imgur.com/YyBozpk.jpg

And the backside:
http://i.imgur.com/839aiId.jpg

And when I go look at a sheet I made a while ago I feel that I really progressed.
That until I turn on the tv and don't understand shit from shinchan which is a little depressing. But even then I still pick up a lot more then when before.
百芸
79737 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 5/11/15
J through L looks pretty intimidating. I hope I get to that level some day.
百芸
79737 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 5/12/15
I picked up this book last night at the book store:
http://www.tofugu.com/reviews/the-kodansha-kanji-usage-guide/

Homophones are a challenge, so I'm glad I found this book. It's ironic that the very next day, I see the article posted above. :D

More importantly to me, Kodansha USA had stopped publishing new books several years ago. This is the first new book I've seen from them in a while, so I hope that this means their books will be easier to find now.
先生
5467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 5/12/15
Sushi-san: Thanks for explaining about seal stones/seal carving in detail! Do you still have that seal stone you carved? You mentioned how professional seals have the characters raised above the backgrounds, this version is the one that makes the characters appear red and the background of the seal is white when it's stamped, is that correct? Because my seal is the complete opposite: the characters are carved into the seal and when stamped, the characters are white and the background is red. If I remember, these two seal carving styles are called yin style and yang style. What are the differences regarding yin and yang style? Like, do you know when one would use a stamp with yin style, and when one would choose to use a stamp with yang style?

Gianni-san: Thanks for those pictures! It was great to be able to zoom in and see the contents of the sheet! If you don't mind me asking, what level are you on currently? I agree with Ditto-san J through L look intimidating but interesting!! I wonder what the story "The Mystery Man of Twenty Faces" is about because that sounds intriguing!

Ditto-san, once again thanks for sharing this book with us! It seems like you're always buying some Japanese books!
When I read the article, this part caught my eye: 赤い and 紅い since I was wondering about the exact thing today, seeing how in Chinese, I learned that 紅 (Hóng) means "red", I wondered if the same were true in Japanese seeing how we all know 赤い means red! I'm going to add this book to my wish list Thanks for mentioning it !!!
漢和名手
59482 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 5/12/15
The great majority of seals I've seen on artworks and documents and such are 朱文 or "red letters," with the letters raised above the background on the seal itself. Apparently, this corresponds to the "yang" style (陽) . The opposite is 白文 or "white letters" with the letters carved into the seal-- a.k.a. "yin" style (陰). I've not seen this sort very often. As the red letter type would require a lot more carving to make, I'm guessing it'd take more skill (or at the very least time and effort). To my knowledge, there is no particular difference in usage with regard to the two styles.
百芸
79737 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 5/13/15

Ichibanx3 wrote:
Ditto-san, once again thanks for sharing this book with us! It seems like you're always buying some Japanese books!
When I read the article, this part caught my eye: 赤い and 紅い since I was wondering about the exact thing today, seeing how in Chinese, I learned that 紅 (Hóng) means "red", I wondered if the same were true in Japanese seeing how we all know 赤い means red! I'm going to add this book to my wish list Thanks for mentioning it !!!


You're welcome. I am a bibliophile, so I have quite the book collection. :D

As for 赤い and 紅い, the book doesn't explicitly state the difference, unlike some other homophones. But, it does confirm my impression that 赤い is for red, in general, and 紅い tends to be used for darker reds. It's also used in word for "black tea" (紅茶), though I think many people refer to this tea as Orange Pekoe.
先輩(Moderator)
1245 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Poland
Offline
Posted 5/13/15
Wow, that book looks so neat! You're right, homophones are often a cause of confusion - especially so if you're dealing with words that are very similar in meaning but differ depending on the context x_x Would've gladly gotten my hands on it as well.

And yeah, 紅い or 紅 (くれない) usually refer to deep red or crimson. I've seen it also being translated as 'scarlet', but wouldn't that be a slightly brighter colour?
先生
5467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 5/13/15
Sushi-san: that's great that there's no difference in usage between my two styles. I was slightly worried that they would have varying usage since I've seemed to see seals with the yang style.

Ditto san: you always do seem to find such great Japanese books! As always, thanks for sharing your finds with us~

Ditto san and senpai: Thank you for sharing the difference between: 赤い and 紅い. One question: According to Google translate 真っ赤 means both "bright red" and "Deep red" With all these variations on the color "Red" is the easiest thing to do is just to stick with 赤い? Then again, whenever I walk down the paint aisle in home improvement stores, I am amazed at the variation of names for colors some companies come up with!
漢和名手
59482 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Online
Posted 5/14/15
I'm thinking that perhaps 赤い is like the English word "red," i.e. sort of a general "default" term that is most commonly used for the concept, without being too specific. Those who want to be really fancy might bring up words like vermillion, scarlet, crimson, carmine and so on.... various shades of red. These words have specific definitions and aren't strictly synonymous, but most of us in daily life and usage don't fuss too much over the distinctions, and probably don't use these words very often anyway-- "red" is good enough most of the time. I'd guess Japanese would have similar variant words that are perhaps used regularly and precisely only by those particularly in the know. Just kind of speculating out loud here, as it were...
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.