Post Reply Anime Vs Manga
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Posted 12/13/14
What did you feel was better?

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Posted 12/13/14
Manga because it is more detailed and doesn't have fillers like anime.
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Posted 12/14/14
I think what I meant was which was better in respect to the Anime or the Manga

Example:

Which did you like better? The Naruto Anime or The Naruto Manga?

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Posted 12/14/14
Oh. Thanks for clarifying.

For me, I like the manga/anime Fairy Tail( as an example for me) and I prefer the manga because right now the anime is doing a filler arc and is adding random information.

I actually like the Naruto anime more since the fillers actually give information about the characters bringing out their true nature and real personalities.

It depends on what anime/manga you talk about.
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Posted 12/18/14
I'll go ahead and take a swipe at the low hanging fruit this time and discuss Akira a bit. Now, I know that film and manga are different media with different needs. When you craft a manga you don't have a limit to your run time. You can take your time, drawing out as many plot lines as you feel the story would do better to have. In film you have some leeway to stray from the plot, but you really only have about 1-3 hours to do everything you're wanting to do. I get that distinction, and thus I understand why sometimes translating a manga into a film can come at the expense of minor plot threads.



To its credit the film did at least try to speak to the manga's central themes. You've got Colonel Shikishima expressing frustration at a government he feels has become too weak and corrupted to do what must be done, Tetsuo's inferiority complex is used to express the frustration of Japanese youth at being directed too strictly by a generation which seems to be out of touch with their children, the big things are there. They're just not delivered as well. You can compress the youthful frustration that the Great Tokyo Empire was supposed to represent, that its war with Miyako's faction was really all about beneath the surface, into a single character if you want. That's possible. But it greatly reduces the scale of the message and risks leaving Tetsuo looking less like that representative you're trying to make him into and more a representative of his individual frustrations. I feel that the latter was accomplished far more than the former in the film, which is a shame.

The visuals are striking in both the manga and the film adaptation. Otomo's attention even to tiny background details is represented in the film, and its use of color and effects leaves a powerful impression. The problem is that the manga did all that, too. The color pages were equally gritty and vibrant where they needed to be and richly detailed. The sequencing in the manga was established such that the same blood pumping excitement generated by those motorcycle scenes in the film can be experienced by someone reading the manga. Read volume 3, you'll see what I mean.

So we have a situation where what the film does poorly the manga does well, and what the film does well the manga also does well. The manga wins.
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Posted 12/23/14
It's strange despite being a HUGE anime fan I could never really get int Akira, I found the plot very simple and fueled by the wrong reasons. I also did not fancy the kind of unneeded almost rape scene in the movie.

There was no real reason that they needed to do that. It could have been something more significant the triggered the transformation.
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Posted 12/24/14

Crescentstara wrote:

It's strange despite being a HUGE anime fan I could never really get int Akira, I found the plot very simple and fueled by the wrong reasons. I also did not fancy the kind of unneeded almost rape scene in the movie.

There was no real reason that they needed to do that. It could have been something more significant the triggered the transformation.


The fact that the film adaptation of Akira hollows out the plot to the point where little more than its rind is left is one of its chief weaknesses, and its narrative incoherence is one of its chiefest weaknesses, so it's unsurprising that you'd find the film to be underwhelming compared to the extent to which it is hyped up. What people are usually most excited about when they speak of the film adaptation of Akira are its visuals and its action sequences, which are of genuinely high quality for their time. It takes good advantage of the fact that anime is a visual medium, but forgets that excellent visual presentation is no substitute for effective storytelling. It doesn't help that the soundtrack is subpar, either.

As for the rape scene, you're right: the film didn't need it. We'd already established that Kaori was Tetsuo's girlfriend, so there was no need to put her in such a situation to either show that she was or bring that about. This was all done to provide Tetsuo an opportunity to show the audience that his sanity was slipping and that he had authority issues, and frankly that had already been accomplished and could be reinforced sufficiently even if the scene were entirely excised from the film. The only thing the scene really accomplishes beyond those things I already mentioned is showing the audience that street gang members are violent people, which not only had also been accomplished far earlier in the film (the main characters and a rival gang were beating each other with pipes and chains, for Heaven's sake) but is also obvious.

The film's biggest weakness, however, is that it strays from where the emphasis really ought to be. The emphasis really should've been on the street violence, not on the psychic powers or the mayhem they caused. Those were a device to bring about the conditions necessary for the portrayal of conflict between generations and interests therein the author was seeking. They were the garnish, not the meal.
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