Post Reply Yona of the Dawn
Polysyllabic Support Lead
51494 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / M / CR HQ
Offline
Posted 12/17/14 , edited 12/23/14
by Eclipsed_Oblivion

The representation of female characters has long been the subject of debate within the anime community, many craving female characters whose purpose doesn't revolve around men. Satisfying both this and more is none other than Yona of the Dawn, a reverse harem adventure that sees a spoiled princess transform into a powerful warrior. On top of this, the series fully fleshes out its unique, Korean-inspired fantasy setting, and it even remains gender-inclusive by defying reverse harem conventions.

At first, Yona of the Dawn appears to be a traditional reverse harem anime ― titular character Yona, the sole princess of the Kouka Kingdom, casually spends her days with her first love, Soo-won, and her guardian, Hak. However, tragedy soon befalls Yona that forces her to flee her kingdom with Hak and live as a fugitive, leaving her broken and conflicted. Yona of the Dawn follows Yona’s journey to become strong enough to save her kingdom, as well as the mythical fate to which her striking red hair has bound her.

While Yona’s hair is what draws others to her, what first draws many to Yona of the Dawn is its function as a character development piece. With circumstances as a catalyst, it is ultimately Yona who decides to change herself. Having been a sheltered, pampered princess, being exposed to the real world reveals her weaknesses, and this, rather than any male character, solidifies her resolve to save her kingdom. She is a self-propelled warrior, especially as she doesn’t just increase her physical strength, but her mental fortitude as well; tragedy leaves her lost at first, but she discovers how resilient she is as she realizes the need to protect herself and her friends. What perhaps is most significant, however, is that she doesn’t mimic male characters to be seen as strong; she empowers herself with her own femininity to become a formidable woman.

Also formidable is how Yona of the Dawn fully establishes its unique setting. Instead of using a J-Pop song, the series opens with Korean-inspired instrumental music that underlines the series’s historical setting, and it is fitting in its simplicity. As the story unfolds, it becomes extremely evident that the setting is quite influenced by Korea’s ancient Three Kingdoms period ―the geography is extremely similar, and the series draws upon many cultural elements as well. This cultural influence certainly sets Yona of the Dawn apart from other anime aesthetically and contributes to creating a unique world, but this is is where the similarities end; Yona of the Dawn does not remotely reflect actual history, but generates its own creation mythology and history to give life and meaning to its world.

What gives meaning to Yona of the Dawn as a whole is how it defies reverse harem conventions by reducing the importance of romance. While Yona certainly cares about her male friends, many who don’t appear to be love interests, she learns and grows from all the people around her instead of just the prominent men in her life. This makes the series seem more about a girl who happens to befriend many men instead of just being a reverse harem. These men are also introduced very gradually throughout the series and are more important to the plot than any romantic subplot, which doesn’t mean that no one has feelings for Yona, but they are not the focus of the story. Filled with politics, corruption, battles, adventure, and heroism, Yona of the Dawn distances itself from romance without disregarding it, and this makes it more gender-inclusive.

Rather than being about "which guy the girl picks," Yona of the Dawn is about fighting injustice and discovering one's destiny. Yona herself is a role model by being a female character important for her own value rather than her relationships with men, and the historical fantasy world through which she travels is exquisitely established. As well, by focusing on elements more critical to the fate of the kingdom rather than just romance, Yona of the Dawn defies reverse harem conventions and can be enjoyed by everyone. Whether Yona will manage to save her kingdom or not is unknown, but regardless of the outcome, watching her become such a strong person is worth the journey.
50010 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / M
Offline
Posted 12/22/14 , edited 12/23/14
You should add a link to the series when you make a newsletter article.
240 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / F
Offline
Posted 12/26/14
I like this review :D
super accurate. Yona is awesome
240 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / F
Offline
Posted 12/26/14
plus, there are no spoors in this....
7773 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
I just know this has turned out to be a good anime!
1102 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / F
Offline
Posted 2/19/15

Instead of using a J-Pop song, the series opens with Korean-inspired instrumental music that underlines the series’s historical setting, and it is fitting in its simplicity.



SECOND OP WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS TO US???? **leaves to have a good cry**
3048 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Academy city
Offline
Posted 4/8/15
I love this anime.
142 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
14 / F
Offline
Posted 4/8/15
Hi I'm gonna post look or sound alike pics please suggest those I don't get
You must be logged in to post.