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Your culture.
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21 / M
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Posted 12/17/14 , edited 12/17/14
my favorite culture:
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21 / 11.8728° N, 122.8...
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Posted 12/18/14

wingsday wrote:

my favorite culture:


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35 / M
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Posted 12/18/14 , edited 12/18/14

wingsday wrote:

my favorite culture:



I was curious why you didn't say these cultures..


until I saw your age. :P

from NJ, and I'm an irish-american. which means that whenever I eat marshmallow-y cereals or drink too much, I dress in green, speak funny and steal people's gold....

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21 / M
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Posted 12/18/14

serifsansserif wrote:


wingsday wrote:

my favorite culture:



I was curious why you didn't say these cultures..


until I saw your age. :P

from NJ, and I'm an irish-american. which means that whenever I eat marshmallow-y cereals or drink too much, I dress in green, speak funny and steal people's gold....



I probably would have said that actually....but I forgot....
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M / HI
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Posted 12/18/14
Well im from Hawaii and I guess you could say im 3rd generation Japnese.
Culture is a great deal too me
In Hawaii there is a diverse population so you get a taste of each culture from a lot of things here
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Posted 12/18/14 , edited 12/18/14
well, i'm from the deep south but also from the Caribbean so our culture is about this.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCuhLttQlXo
and this...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7F6IsrghyQ
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25 / M / Florida
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Posted 12/18/14
Born and raised in Florida.
Also 3rd Gen Irish descendant.

Proud of my Irish culture, more proud I am then my current American culture I can say that right now.
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20 / M / Texas, USA
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Posted 12/18/14
I am part of the Metalhead clan. Nuff said
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M / Houston, Tx
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Posted 12/18/14
Vietnamese people use to dominate as they rebelled away from China to be their own country, but now we're just pathetic.

We're just a place where rich herbs and spice are planted and sold, no major business contributing to the world except our food.
It's sad, we're like a duplicate of Korea.
Posted 12/18/14

ChibiNighty wrote:

I'm from Vietnam, but what most people think when they hear Vietnam is the Vietnam War or Pho.
I love my culture and it saddens me when the only thing people think of is a war from the past.


LOL man, I love pho. I really do. I can eat it and never eat anything else ever again.
Posted 12/18/14
I refuse to tell people my culture not because I'm ashamed or whatever, it's just because I don't think it's something necessary for people, or friends, to know about. If they ask for more information then I will tell them but unless I'm specifically asked I won't say anything.

I don't ask my white friends about they're culture because they'll go all into detail about how they're half irish, half british, half german etc... man I just asked if you're from America not where your ancestors are from.
Posted 12/19/14
Filipinos are mostly viewed as keyboard warriors aka trash talkers (mostly bc of DOTA2), need i say more?
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23 / M / NL
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Posted 12/19/14 , edited 12/19/14
Born and raised in a city called Utrecht, 20 minutes away from Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Typical Dutch things;

The Bicycle
There is no one in this country without a bicycle. We have almost 17 million people in this country, but we have more than 19 million functional bicycles in this country as well. Every family has at least 1 of those things. If you ever plan to go to Amsterdam, some advice: use a bicycle, not a car.

Food

Typical Dutch food are probalby 'snert', 'stroopwafel', 'hagelslag', 'oliebollen', herring. 'kroket', 'frikandel', licorice.

Hagelslag are chocolate thingies, that we put on our sandwiches in the morning for breakfast. lol.

Sinterklaas & Zwarte Piet

We celebrate Sinterklaas. The guy looks almost the same as Santa. Many people that don't live in this country seem to dislike it because of Black Pete. Few weeks later we celebrate Christmas. 2 times in 1 month getting a lot of presents.

Clog

No, we don't walk on them anymore. Only a few in this country still do.

Tulips and Windmills

Yes, we have a lot of both. And I love them both.

Most Dutch people are open minded, we all love the color orange, eat a lot of cheese, celebrate kingsday, play a lot of soccer, and ehh, yeah. That's all I can think of for now.



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Posted 12/19/14

-tenshi wrote:

Filipinos are mostly viewed as keyboard warriors aka trash talkers (mostly bc of DOTA2), need i say more?


Is it expensive to purchase computers and have internet access in the Philippines?
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UK
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Posted 12/19/14 , edited 12/19/14
I've got a mix of English and Caribbean culture since I've lived both places. In the UK there's lots of tea drinking though some in the city are changing to coffee. I really dislike hot drinks so I avoid all of that. I'll happily join in and moan about the weather with everyone else. This time of the year they make mince pies, the mince is dried mixed fruit soaked in some liquid that may contain suet and alcohol. I've never taken to them.

In the Caribbean people do mention that it's hot but that's all they have to say about the weather. Each island has its own culture, accent and food dishes. There are similarities. This time of the year they sing christmas carrols in French patois or Spanish even though many of the countries use English dialects as their mother tongue. They say yes twice like this, "yes, oui", once in English and again in French. We children got called "doux doux darlings". We thought we'd been insulted since doo doo is a child's way of saying excrement in England. I didn't find out that it was "doux doux" which is French patois for "sweet, sweet" until I was 18 and had already left the Caribbean.

There are some festive foods that are the same as in England. They'll be doing roast meats for festive dinners just like the English only they make theirs spicier. They'll also add curries and pastels which are known as hallacas in south America. Some islands have different recipes. I grew up having our made from cornmeal/polenta. Others use grated green banana and some grated root vegetables. These are parcels filled with cooked minced meat, olives/capers, spices, herbs, peppers and onions. Then can be steamed or boiled. There's sweet ones that use dried fruits and coconut in them. They'd be wrapped in banana leaves to be cooked. In south America some use corn leaves to wrap them up. I can make them where I am now but I have to use foil and greaseproof paper.

They have carnival, and there's different types of music in the Caribbean. They play the steel pan so most schools have steel pan orchestras. I know of soca, reggae, zouk, chutney soca (sung in Hindi and or English), dub and other music that has evolved from reggae and or soca. Not everyone is into carnival though its popular.

Everyone where I grew up celebrated all holidays even if it wasn't their religion. There'd be partying for Christmas, Easter, Pagwa, Eid, Hoosay, Divali, Carnival and their independence day with friends and neighbour inviting everyone to come around.

In England when you're invited to parties or celebration you get there at the time you've been given in the Caribbean it's different. Lets say you've been told things start at 7pm, the earliest you get there is 8pm. If you really want your guests on time you lie to them and tell them you want them an hour or two before you wish them to come. Then they'll get there right on time.
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