First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply Who likes earth houses?
5238 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/25/14
Either adobe, cob or rammed earth can be discussed here.
2459 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M / Minnesota, USA
Offline
Posted 12/26/14
I like the idea of them but they seem like they'd be too much work to maintain over the long run. Anytime I'm staying at someone's house I prefer sleeping in the dark cool basement though so I have a feeling I'd enjoy a hobbit style house.
4500 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 12/26/14 , edited 12/26/14
They do seem eco friendly but they can't be built everywhere. For instance in swampy areas or near shorelines. I like the fact that many aren't square and use very little right angles. They are cheap to built but its a very labour intensive process. In south west England they still have some cob buildings around that are centuries old. Most countries have heard of this in their histories. It'd be hard to get planning permission to build one these days.
48449 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / AZ
Offline
Posted 12/26/14 , edited 12/26/14
Some of my maternal relatives were still living in them in the 1980's.
We will never go back to those things,
Posted 12/26/14
any house is better than a bench :c
4500 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 1/5/15
I've seen the modern versions and they're beautiful. Since I like art and craft I wouldn't mind helping to build one.

here's one





http://www.the-self-build-guide.co.uk/cob-houses.html

A farmer decided to build one just to see how much it would cost him. It was £150. He already had land and got some used stuff from people.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2513154/Farmer-builds-house-just-150-using-materials-skips--current-tenant-pays-rent-MILK.html
9200 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M
Offline
Posted 1/5/15
I honestly, prefer the idea of homes made from shipping containers. There's a huge surplus of them here in the US too.
556 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / F / Las Vegas nevada
Offline
Posted 1/5/15 , edited 1/5/15
I like it.. They looks so cool..
4500 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 1/8/15

serifsansserif wrote:

I honestly, prefer the idea of homes made from shipping containers. There's a huge surplus of them here in the US too.


I've seen some they can look good. Though costs will go up getting containers to some places especially far inland and they require cranes to move in place. The worry is that they might be some residual contamination left from the goods/materials they used to export/import.
4251 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M
Offline
Posted 1/8/15
shiiiit.. Now that I look at a few different Cob Houses, they seem pretty fricken awesome.. I wouldn't mind having one off in some really pretty area.
Posted 1/8/15

serifsansserif wrote:

I honestly, prefer the idea of homes made from shipping containers. There's a huge surplus of them here in the US too.


I'm in this camp. Most of them don't look half bad, and I've a soft spot for metals- metals are my friends.

9200 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M
Offline
Posted 1/8/15 , edited 1/8/15

tkayt wrote:


serifsansserif wrote:

I honestly, prefer the idea of homes made from shipping containers. There's a huge surplus of them here in the US too.


I've seen some they can look good. Though costs will go up getting containers to some places especially far inland and they require cranes to move in place. The worry is that they might be some residual contamination left from the goods/materials they used to export/import.


true, but they usually end up in coastal cities, which, coincidentally, is pretty much where most people in any given non-landlocked country live. They cost, if I remember correctly, about 20K per, and you can prefab them to make modular pieces for the most part before you drop them in place. Since they're standard sizes, it's basically like building with legos. Structurally, they're solid. They're designed to hold up to salt corrosion, incredible amounts of weight and pressure, and be water tight. Having worked in them (a local storage place uses them for storage units and "shop space"), I can tell you that properly insulated, they can hold heat/cold damned well, but they definitely need proper insulation and air flow.

the big advantage is that it does deal witha very common problem in the US:


"The abundance and relative cheapness of these containers during the last decade comes from the deficit in manufactured goods coming from North America in the last two decades. These manufactured goods come to North America from Asia and, to a lesser extent, Europe, in containers that often have to be shipped back empty, or "deadhead", at considerable expense. It is often cheaper to buy new containers in Asia than to ship old ones back. Therefore, new applications are sought for the used containers that have reached their North American destination."


Here's some awesome pics: http://www.trueactivist.com/a-shipping-container-costs-about-2000-what-these-15-people-did-with-that-is-beyond-epic/

and here's some info on buying the containers:
http://www.dwell.com/how/article/how-buy-shipping-container

Nobody's going to argue that taking the materials found on site (ie. the earth itself, if you need to say, level the property and it's fairly hilly, or clear cut your space and use the resulting lumber) is far cheaper, (IF you have the proper clay content, etc. to build such a home). But the argument can be made that by using earth you also run into a lot of problems, including how to bring modern conveniences in to the building. (unless you aren't doing it yourself, and aren't talking solid walls - with containers, sheet rocking the inside after insulation is kinda assumed). Plus on the insulation front, earthen materials aren't necessarily the best insulators of heat anyhow. Wood and "fluffy" stuff is. With metal, a thin corrugated sheet can hold a lot of weight and still be structurally sound, with clay or earth, you need a LOT more thickness to do so.

Also, earthen materials aren't quite the best for building up. They need a lot of reinforcement, to go vertical. With shipping containers, you can probably go at least 10 (containers) high.
bleh09 
10340 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / M / Texas
Offline
Posted 1/8/15
In the city where I live, it is somewhat common for someone to live in an adobe house. And quite frankly I believe that they are very nice and very helpful for the hot and cold weather.
4500 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 1/8/15 , edited 1/8/15

serifsansserif


"The abundance and relative cheapness of these containers during the last decade comes from the deficit in manufactured goods coming from North America in the last two decades. These manufactured goods come to North America from Asia and, to a lesser extent, Europe, in containers that often have to be shipped back empty, or "deadhead", at considerable expense. It is often cheaper to buy new containers in Asia than to ship old ones back. Therefore, new applications are sought for the used containers that have reached their North American destination."


Here's some awesome pics: http://www.trueactivist.com/a-shipping-container-costs-about-2000-what-these-15-people-did-with-that-is-beyond-epic/

and here's some info on buying the containers:
http://www.dwell.com/how/article/how-buy-shipping-container

Nobody's going to argue that taking the materials found on site (ie. the earth itself, if you need to say, level the property and it's fairly hilly, or clear cut your space and use the resulting lumber) is far cheaper, (IF you have the proper clay content, etc. to build such a home). But the argument can be made that by using earth you also run into a lot of problems, including how to bring modern conveniences in to the building. (unless you aren't doing it yourself, and aren't talking solid walls - with containers, sheet rocking the inside after insulation is kinda assumed). Plus on the insulation front, earthen materials aren't necessarily the best insulators of heat anyhow. Wood and "fluffy" stuff is. With metal, a thin corrugated sheet can hold a lot of weight and still be structurally sound, with clay or earth, you need a LOT more thickness to do so.

Also, earthen materials aren't quite the best for building up. They need a lot of reinforcement, to go vertical. With shipping containers, you can probably go at least 10 (containers) high.


I'm not a fan of high rise. I can tolerate low rise but that's my limit. High rises at the top of the market will have not problem when it comes to selling but its not so easy with mid to lower priced property. These days many places don't think about noises insulation so it can be nightmare for people living next to someone who's habits aren't the same as theirs.

I kind of grew up in a culture where all houses were all brick or some older ones wood. You'd have to go to some rural areas to still find the odd cob house with outdoor cob oven if you were really poor. I'd known of some introduced few prefabs in my teens and people called them cardboard homes in disgust. Even our new home was unacceptable to some because it was terraced housing. Many people complained that it was necessary to have land all around a single home and not to have them stuck together. Now there are more like these. The amount of low rise flats has increased too so they're starting to become a bit more acceptable.
9200 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M
Offline
Posted 1/8/15

tkayt wrote:

I'm not a fan of high rise. I can tolerate low rise but that's my limit. High rises at the top of the market will have not problem when it comes to selling but its not so easy with mid to lower priced property. These days many places don't think about noises insulation so it can be nightmare for people living next to someone who's habits aren't the same as theirs.

I kind of grew up in a culture where all houses were all brick or some older ones wood. You'd have to go to some rural areas to still find the odd cob house with outdoor cob oven if you were really poor. I'd known of some introduced few prefabs in my teens and people called them cardboard homes in disgust. Even our new home was unacceptable to some because it was terraced housing. Many people complained that it was necessary to have land all around a single home and not to have them stuck together. Now there are more like these. The amount of low rise flats has increased too so they're starting to become a bit more acceptable.


Ok, I'm not saying I'd like a 10 story house either. The advantage of being able to build up though is that you can have more space, but preserve a smaller footprint. (This helps if you are trying to conserve the land around you, or might be in a more densely populated area.)

As for having a lot of land around your property, that's something that people find desirous. Unfortunately, what they forget is that when they start clear cutting some of that space to put in a lawn, they're creating areas where wind becomes a problem. Additionally, every foot of lawn you create is another foot of lawn you need to mow and water. And not only is that a lot of upkeep, but it's also not ecologically friendly. Not saying I don't want some ground of my own, but I would rather leave it natural or use a small portion of it for gardening purposes.

The rest of what you say, I concede to. They're all fair points.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.