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Post Reply Who likes earth houses?
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Posted 1/8/15

serifsansserif


Ok, I'm not saying I'd like a 10 story house either. The advantage of being able to build up though is that you can have more space, but preserve a smaller footprint. (This helps if you are trying to conserve the land around you, or might be in a more densely populated area.)

As for having a lot of land around your property, that's something that people find desirous. Unfortunately, what they forget is that when they start clear cutting some of that space to put in a lawn, they're creating areas where wind becomes a problem. Additionally, every foot of lawn you create is another foot of lawn you need to mow and water. And not only is that a lot of upkeep, but it's also not ecologically friendly. Not saying I don't want some ground of my own, but I would rather leave it natural or use a small portion of it for gardening purposes.

The rest of what you say, I concede to. They're all fair points.


Part of that Caribbean culture is also to have a little kitchen garden that'll supply the home with herbs, some vegetables and if they're lucky at least one fruit tree. Not all aspire to have lots of lawn. We had a lawn in the front but in the back of our small garden had a banana tree, sorrel bushes, some herbs and even some of the neighbour's black eye peas trailed over on our side. Now there's an avocado tree added which surprised me because that one grows into a huge tree. Wind is not a problem there, wind as they know it as a gentle breeze (hurricanes are a different matter). I had to leave the country to realise that in other places wind can blow a person over if its strong. Mother paid someone to do the lawn in the front we kids got to be lazy in that aspect.

These days I don't have a garden but still try to have a window box.
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Posted 1/8/15 , edited 1/8/15

tkayt wrote:


Part of that Caribbean culture is also to have a little kitchen garden that'll supply the home with herbs, some vegetables and if they're lucky at least one fruit tree. Not all aspire to have lots of lawn. We had a lawn in the front but in the back of our small garden had a banana tree, sorrel bushes, some herbs and even some of the neighbour's black eye peas trailed over on our side. Now there's an avocado tree added which surprised me because that one grows into a huge tree. Wind is not a problem there, wind as they know it as a gentle breeze (hurricanes are a different matter). I had to leave the country to realise that in other places wind can blow a person over if its strong. Mother paid someone to do the lawn in the front we kids got to be lazy in that aspect.

These days I don't have a garden but still try to have a window box.


Around me it's just the opposite problem. gigantic houses and the proverbial McMansions (all traditional materials. Mostly wood. Even the stone facades are fake). All on these 1-2 acre properties that you can obviously see were clearcut by how perfectly the border between the property and wooded land is. Two to three stories high, and most of the house and the land is unused. I live in a tiny 500 square foot apartment, which, honestly, suits my needs fine, but I'd like to have a patch of ground near the house to garden in. No real need to a lawn. And I'd like a ground floor workshop for my various hobbies.

Ideally, in my heart of hearts, first floor open space workshop, probably around 750 square feet minimum. (25x30) or something larger and very open with perhaps a small room towards the back. Second floor living space. bathroom, kitchen, dining/living area, bedroom, third floor a greenhouse with a pitched roof and three to four sides all glass. It seems like a lot but the living space is not overly huge, and primarily is dependent upon the fact that I need a LOT of space to work.
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Posted 1/8/15 , edited 1/8/15

serifsansserif


Around me it's just the opposite problem. gigantic houses and the proverbial McMansions (all traditional materials. Mostly wood. Even the stone facades are fake). All on these 1-2 acre properties that you can obviously see were clearcut by how perfectly the border between the property and wooded land is. Two to three stories high, and most of the house and the land is unused. I live in a tiny 500 square foot apartment, which, honestly, suits my needs fine, but I'd like to have a patch of ground near the house to garden in. No real need to a lawn. And I'd like a ground floor workshop for my various hobbies.

Ideally, in my heart of hearts, first floor open space workshop, probably around 750 square feet minimum. (25x30) or something larger and very open with perhaps a small room towards the back. Second floor living space. bathroom, kitchen, dining/living area, bedroom, third floor a greenhouse with a pitched roof and three to four sides all glass. It seems like a lot but the living space is not overly huge, and primarily is dependent upon the fact that I need a LOT of space to work.


If every adult were to live like that in the Caribbean, there'd be trouble because the islands are tiny. It is becoming more popular for the upper middle class to aspire to that though. The average home is moderate and small by those standards. Still big enough to have 2-4 bedrooms, a porch and some have 2 reception rooms, one for the adults mainly and one for the kids since they don't think the kids can be trusted with keeping the place pristine and not breaking their precious ornaments. There are some really badly off who rent a room as lodgers and in rural areas it may get as bad as a little rickety old house.

I think small is fine as long as it suits your needs. Even in the UK many areas especially in cities and the surrounds aren't 1-2 acre plots. It's an island here too. Houses may look big but room sizes can be small. I've visited someone who told me her own was described as a 3 bedroom. I call it a 2 bedroom with a walk in cupboard because only a baby's cot and baby clothing storage would really fit in the last tiny room.

Our new home that mother got came with a tiny galley kitchen. She took one look and said that would never do since socially the family spends more time in the kitchen and would probably skip the sitting room most times. Renovations were done and we got a family size dining table to put in it. Neighbours who bought similar houses joked that you had to come out of the kitchen to change your mind and they all did the same.

My mother's generation recall many tiny houses that looked quite pretty but were small. Great grandmother's generation talked about medium to small houses that had separate building as kitchens and out houses. Great aunt had one which was adorable. She put a roof between the separate kitchen and the main house making it all a bigger house and put in an indoor bathroom and toilet. It had fret work and shutters. She only had room for a single row of flowers in the front before it came to the street. In the back she had room to grow fruits and vegetables and at the back of the garden you could still see the old defunct latrine.
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Posted 1/8/15
Cool, although I'll have to pass on that one.
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Posted 4/15/16
Digging old discussion up.

Wither is here in the hot Southwest or up in the snowy Midwest, I would go for it.
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