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Is CNN Trustworthy? What News Networks Are?
Posted 12/28/14 , edited 12/28/14
Question, is CNN trustworthy? Ever since I saw that anime article, I'm more wary of them as a potential source. Are any other news networks trustworthy?
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21 / M / Oslo, Norway
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Posted 12/28/14 , edited 1/2/15
Yes and no. Goes for all news networks.

To elaborate: some are more trustworthy than others, but all of them slip occasionally.
You should be critical of ALL information you get from ANY media(including science papers, if reading those are your thing). Think about where they got their information, whether or not any sources are relevant, if they have anything to gain on covering it, etc.

Oh, and confirmation bias is a bitch. Try to be as critical with things that goes against your beliefs/"knowledge" as the things that agree with you.
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22 / M / New York
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Posted 12/28/14
Every single media network has it's own briefcase of mishaps.

Although, I personally find CNN more accurate for the people than MSNBC and especially FOX News.
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Posted 12/28/14 , edited 12/28/14
Hodhandr is exactly right. TV media especially is very prone to sensationalism these days, even segregating themselves into their own separate networks so as to not have to cover both sides of a story. Not to mention in the rush to be "first" on a story, they will often report things as if they were facts when they are only speculation -- you have to listen and read carefully for those "might" and "appears" sorts of words.

I think a good attitude when hearing "Word is just coming in from the scene that the suspect may have been identified" sorts of lead-ins should be given extremely low priority. My feeling is, "Ok, well you go confirm that first, and tell me about it tomorrow when you're sure then." Otherwise you spend a lot of energy following what turns out to be nothing.

I find NPR in general is the best source for "real" journalism, the only problem (if it is a problem) is they report on lots of different things and may not be talking about something you find interesting at any given moment. They aren't in the game for the money with a donation-based model as opposed to an advertisement-based model.

The Associated Press in general is pretty non-biased and very fact-based, but any story you see is subject to the whim of the editor in charge of the media service (web site, newspaper), who might even edit an AP story creatively or not cite it correctly (taking things out of context but having it sound like they are quoting the AP).
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Posted 12/28/14
I find that ALL news networks always tend to over exaggerate things. For more allure to people. It might be the truth, but it might not be the whole truth.
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Posted 12/28/14
try truth-out (dot org)
save the internet (dot com)
and free press (dot net)
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26 / M / Socal
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Posted 12/28/14 , edited 12/28/14
All news are riddled with political agendas and biases, all of them.

Only one I would recommend, The Associated Press


but as a selfish anarchist who purely seeks out beauty and fun (I wonder if I'm hedonistic as well ), I ignore all of them, equally. True equality right there.

plus they're boring imo

and unless it effects me directly idc either

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24 / M / Surrey, UK
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Posted 12/28/14
I tend to trust stuff that comes from the BBC. I also tend to take notice of Sky News & Al Jazeera.

Al Jazeera is good for coverage of stuff in the middle east and asia, whereas the BBC & Sky tend to focus on europe & the US with a little bit of elsewhere news.
Posted 12/28/14
I'll still watch them though.
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M / Holland
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Posted 12/28/14
I was wondering about that as well. Since CNN is the only news network I actually watch on a daily basis.
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33 / M / Florida
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Posted 12/28/14
I'm a little bit curious as to which news article you are referring to, because there have been many articles written by news agencies about anime. When you talk about entertainment as a news topic, you have to take into account several factors which include but are not limited to; social mores of the target audience for the news source, social mores of the target audience for the entertainment, laws which govern each of the audiences, and diction.

Going backwards on that list, diction was already addressed by marklebid slightly. The words used by news casters and writers will vary based on the "weight" of the words they wish to impart while also having to be careful of charges of libel. Words such as "may," "might have/be," "think," and "suspect" are usually connected with opinions and shouldn't be taken as fact. If someone says, "we think the police may have apprehended the suspect...," then it has null factual value due to all of it being suspicion. At no point does it actually state there is someone in police custody nor that there is someone guilty. You do have to analyze what is being said to find the facts.

In addition to pulling apart the meaning of words, you also have to look at the "emotional value" of words. Sometimes stories are sensationalized by using words with similar meanings but a stronger reaction. For example; "Person A was shot in their home. They are dead and the police are asking for any information you have to catch the person that shot Person A," compared to "Person A was murdered in their home. The murderer has escaped police efforts and they are asking for your assistance. If you have any information at all, please call the police." Both sets of statements convey the same message, but you will notice that the second sounds worse to most people.

As for the laws involved with articles about entertainment, they do vary from place to place. If you are watching or reading about a bar in Puerto Rico, you could see someone 18 years of age consuming alcohol legally. However, if you are in the continental Untied States where the minimum age is 21, then you might feel it is a violation of the law. What has to be remembered, is that the laws do vary from place to place and what is illegal in one location may be legal elsewhere.

Last and perhaps one of the most complex things to remember when reading news articles is the mores of both targets; the news audience and the members the news is about. Social mores are, to quote the Miriam-Webster dictionary, "the customs, values, and behaviors that are accepted by a particular group, culture, etc." For example, take the legalization of homosexual marriages in multiple states of the United States of America. The "religiously conservative" population views such practice as immoral and discourage such relationships due to their mores. However, the pro-LGBT community sees the legal action as a triumph due to their mores. They both are forced to admit that the marriages are legal at this time, but their mores cause them to view the topic in different manners.

As for the original question, I don't think any news agency isn't completely trustworthy nor untrustworthy. What you have to do is suspect every article, every broadcast, every publication, every editor, every author, every reporter, etc. and identify what their goal is with the news story. If they have a "witness" or "expert," you also have to suspect them and their mores. There is no such thing as plain, complete, factual news. There is always going to be some motive in addition to presenting a news story, so what is/are the additional motive(s) driving the article to publication/presentation?
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19 / M / Future Gadget Lab...
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Posted 12/28/14

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Question, is CNN trustworthy? Ever since I saw that anime article, I'm more wary of them as a potential source. Are any other news networks trustworthy?


There is no such thing as true objectivity in the news or in politics; there will always be some king of skew in media outlets that appeals to a particular political ideology and or to a certain stance on issues, which is unavoidable and cannot be helped. Now the level of skew and the sensationalism placed behind certain stories in the news is when this becomes an issue because these outlets are no longer reporting news or processing news logically; they are instilling opinions and emotions into their audience, which is unacceptable.

There's also an interesting phenomenon known as "selective perception" in the world, meaning that we tend to pay more attention to people or organizations that already affirm our own beliefs and avoid anything that challenges our current belief. This can be done consciously, but more often than not, we act in this manner without even knowing it. In other words, the news stations that people tend to gravitate towards to, even with the goal of trying to find a neutral news station, can often be more skewed than we thought. In other words, everything should be taken with a grain of salt and other sides of the issue should be considered, even if you don't agree with what they are saying.

Don't take me the wrong way: fighting selective perception is not an easy thing and takes a lot of discipline. I certainly have a long way to go myself in overcoming it, as do most people. But my answer to you is there is no such thing as a single, trustworthy news source; if you really care about an issue and the true in-depth facts, you should do research everywhere you can.

This website helps a lot as well; a teacher gave me this resource several years ago:

http://www.factcheck.org/

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23 / M / A town called "Ci...
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Posted 12/28/14
The former Colbert Report.
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M / Houston, Tx
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Posted 12/28/14
Try Newsfix, they usually wait until the last moments to do their research before babbling off B-crap.

Like most channels.. >->
Posted 12/28/14 , edited 12/28/14
None of them are trustworthy. You have to remember that it's people that write those articles, and people are never trustworthy. You need to see through the loaded language and discern what's objective from that jungle of prejudice yourself.
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