Post Reply Did DDOS come from Gaming Devices?or other?
41324 cr points
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54 / M / East Coast
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Posted 12/31/14
I am curious as to where the DDOS attack came from!

After what happened To Play Station and posiible X -Box you have to wonder if the atacck came through them! How about the mobile devices??

I am not placing blame but we cant have this as ongoing occurence . Tech needs to beef up Cyber Security!

Especially with the Winter 2015 season coming soon!

My AV ( PC) is on constantly / I update and run several times a day>

My concern is those other devices / apps come through the device maker and we saw how that worked! Just a thought!
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21 / M / The Heroes Associ...
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Posted 12/31/14
It was most likely due to the new DDoS service that is being sold by a specific hacker group i chose to leave unnamed, due to the fact they are just a bunch of douche script kiddies who have nothing better to do.
zwi
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29 / M / Wichita, KS
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Posted 12/31/14
It's scary that you can disrupt something like a streaming video service or video game network, just imagine if those same attacks were capable of taking down the stock market or other financial systems.
The Wise Wizard
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56 / M / U.S.A. (mid-south)
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Posted 12/31/14

FLjerry2011 wrote:

After what happened To Play Station and posiible X -Box you have to wonder if the atacck came through them! How about the mobile devices??

Game consoles and mobile phones are unlikely to be part of a DDoS botnet.

Modern game consoles run only signed code, so they are difficult to get even non-malicious code onto that hasn't been approved.

Cell phone operating systems were designed in the post-internet era, and makes them far more difficult to exploit, and running unapproved code either requires jailbreaking (iOS), which few people do, or specifically turning off the option to use only the Google Play Store (Android) and downloading or sideloading from an unverified source. A cellphone user that was part of a botnet would also normally quickly detect it by the fact their battery life would suck, and if that didn't alert them, the possible data overage charges would.

Windows machines are the low-hanging fruit, although compromised servers can also do the trick, such as those running NTP (network time protocol):
http://blog.cloudflare.com/technical-details-behind-a-400gbps-ntp-amplification-ddos-attack/
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