First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Post Reply What exactly is Akira about and why is it important?
zalbik 
10318 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
43 / M / OR
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
The manga is wonderful in both artwork and story.
1773 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / New York
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
Well I have not watch the movie or read the manga but I can somehow tell the manga is better since it is impossible to adapt 6 volumes of manga into a a 2 hour movie.
22709 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
Yeah it's basically a warning against messing around with things you don't understand.

Tetsuo was a kid who never felt like he got recognition, and when he finally actually got real power he couldn't control it, probably an analogue to some of the political powers.

I interpreted the "It's begun" line was in reference to the terrorist girl actually being the first human who would be able to control her psychic abilities without the drugs and such that the others were taking, and she was the 1st step towards humanities future.
27764 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
38 / M / Reno, NV
Offline
Posted 1/4/15

MartianMage wrote:

I've always thought that Akira was only "important" to western fans... the way I see it Akira is similar to Dragon Ball Z in the sense that a lot of western fans love it because it is one of the first anime movies that got introduced and was well received in the west.


While you're technically correct in that the movie isn't nearly as well remembered in Japan as in the English-speaking world, it was very important in that it was one of the first real opportunities for anime producers to get exposure in the US and UK, and did influence some of their creative decisions in the following decade. The manga, however, was extremely influential in Japan, and effectively put Young Magazine on the map; its also a pioneering work in the sub-genre of cyberpunk, and influenced writers and artists in the west and the east.

The main thing of note about the film from a Japanese perspective is its use of a more western approach to animation than was typical of anime at the time. Synching lip movements and use of "camera angles" more typical of western work were almost unheard of at the time, and the art style (heavily influenced by French artist Moebius) was certainly unusual, even if Miyazaki had done some similar things in Nausicaa at around the same time.

As to the question at hand...I've generally thought of Akira as a parable about the escalation of military power, and its negative effects on the youth. There's other interpretations that can be taken, but that's always been my feeling.

42405 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / F / New Jersey, USA
Online
Posted 1/4/15
I hate how the ending left me in such confusion.
4500 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
UK
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
I watched it because it was one of the few anime movies that was available. If there'd been more choice around I'd have given it a miss.
7829 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
It was the first big anime to get attention based on being Japanese in the US, and a lot of people's first real experience with animation outside the age ghetto.

Starblazers, Robotech, Battle of the Planets, and Voltron were all fully westernized and converted before they hit the US. Akira was subtitled and exotic.

How many animated films not aimed at kids were distributed before then? Heavy Metal, thanks to skinemax late night.. Fritz the Cat mostly as a trivia question. That's probably about it for stuff that had any name recognition at the time.

Anime became kind of a big deal in the US after that.
31346 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15 , edited 1/4/15
Akira started the first major Anime boom in the West it was a big deal, One of the first Anime i remember watching as a kid i didn't know what Anime was but i thought it was cool they made mature cartoons with blood and swearing in Japan. After that release a lot of Anime distributors popped up and started putting 80's Anime out dubbed and we got classics like Dominion Tank Police and Bubblegum Crisis. That Anime boom peaked with the release of Ghost In The Shell in the mid 90's which was even shown in some cinemas and got a ton of critical praise. After this Anime began to fall out the mainstream until Pokemon started a new boom which lasted a lot longer. The two booms were pretty different the first focused on adult entertainment with violent and sexy shows being bought over and with Pokemon more of the stuff aimed at kids like Dragonball Z became popular and the Anime crowd became younger.
20656 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
39 / M / California
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
I will just mention without spoilers what the character Akira was able to do with his power, they kept it a mystery through most of the film. The revelation of what Akira was, seemed to be part of the message probably maybe?
26455 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Kansas
Offline
Posted 1/4/15

extremekid3708 wrote:

Well I have not watch the movie or read the manga but I can somehow tell the manga is better since it is impossible to adapt 6 volumes of manga into a a 2 hour movie.


not impossible .. it was done
28043 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
As a raging fan of Akira, I can provide some insight.

Why is it awesome? I'll say it this way. When I was in elementary school, I saw a commercial on the Sci-Fi Channel for the American premier (i. e. first time on American television) of the movie Akira. At the time, I had only watched simple children's cartoons. Then I saw this and I was blown away. I said to myself, "I want THAT". That was the day I decided to get into anime. I imagine I was not the only person who reacted in such a way. Most Americans hadn't ever seen something like this.

Another thing that helped make it so awesome is that the animation was so top-notch, not just for its day, but even decades later it's still amazingly done. It's aged very well.

Finally, to address the story, it's basically about creepy experiments done on children which results in one of the children gaining extreme power and blowing up Tokyo. This should not be disconnected from the obvious atom bomb references. In the US, the connection goes over most of our heads, but I imagine it was painfully obvious to the Japanese audiences.

In regards to the manga, yes, it's way more awesome than the movie. More characters, more fleshed-out story, more action, more violence. Everything. It's just awesome. The movie is awesome too. They did a good job of abridging it for a 2-hour film.

As a final note, the art style (this pertains the both the manga and the movie) is, as you can see, very atypical for an anime. It's primarily influenced by European comic book art, which helps it stand even further out as a masterpiece of graphic fiction.
30049 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
Akira is more important not as its individual work but as what occurred as a result of Akira.

As mentioned before Akira is more popular in the West than it is in Japan and it's quite possibly the reason both cyperpunk and dystopian movies had gained a large following in the 90's and early 2000's in american television/movies. (The Matrix is one good example I'm sure everyone is familiar with)

It also was the direct influence that caused digital coloring to be developed/used.

I'd like to point out that Akira did come out in 1988, and many of the themes and elements of the movie were quite before their time, which relates to my earlier point of one of the reasons Akira influenced future works. I have a book from a college course I took on about how Anime influenced western culture. Its tough to follow (maybe a 300 level college course reading material level) and it was a long time since I read it but its quite interesting. The late 80's and early 90's are an extremely far step away from what we are at now in terms of culture and socially accepted norms.
13051 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/15 , edited 1/4/15
Guys, Since I'm not english native, I can't find the words to say what Akira truly is, but I'm going to post someone's review:

- “Control” is the theme of Akira. Wanting it, gaining it, and losing it, one leads to the the next. Tetsuo has always been looked after by Kaneda since they were children, which causes Tetsuo to become resentful towards his own inability and gives him the desire to want to surpass Kaneda. Another character, a scientist with good intentions, strives to control a primal force beyond human comprehension. The politicians believe they control everything, but their pointless bickering and lack of understanding as to what is happening in the real world show that the only things they control are their own wallets. It is the illusion of control that ultimately results in one losing it. (by Ogiue) -

Now i'm going to give a try, i'm sorry for any mistake..
there's two ways of interpration:

the first:
The movie itself represents the fear that japan's society have about Japan's future, their teenagers. why? well, each emotion for a teenager is apocalyptical, they are wild and uncontrollable (Just look at Tetsuo). Also, the 80's was a depressing decade, cold war, the fear of human annihilation, the fear of third war and even the lost decade of the 90's (japan's bubble). The movie has a GREAT pessimist view of the future, of the humanity, with corrupt politics, dictatorship and with a society that has no moral or rules, so it kind of show that they need their kids - the hope- to stand still, to learn and improve not only for Japan's sake, but also the world's sake.
(pay attention at the cities that got hitted.)


the second:
I believe that AKIRA is a power similar to KI (Dragon Ball), Chakra (Naruto) and Cosmus (Saint Seiya). naah.. not gonna post it now, way too long. I'll edit it later

(Isn't really weird that a 88' movie said that the 2020's olympic games was going to be held in tokyo ? O_o)
16843 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M / L'Étoile du Nord,...
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
Akira is an eternal classic by which an anime-enthusiast will be judged for his/her appreciation and liking of anime.

Perhaps I set Akira very very high in concern to anime, but it's awesome. I don't think you need to fully grasp the complexities in the storyline and such to like it, either, because with its smooth animation it's just awesome to watch.
35546 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / In the middle
Offline
Posted 1/4/15
It's a movie that can and will confuse pretty much anyone who watches it. You need some knowledge in history, science, and basically anything related with power and energy. It's like the old books teachers make you read and then it's more about the connections or ideas they bring up rather than just what they wrote down.

It may take multiple watches and maybe some outside research into what others have seen and thought about it, but it definitely isn't overrated. Either way it can be brought up in a lot of conversations and might cause some arguments.
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.