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Post Reply COMMON CORE: are you for it or against it?
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19 / M / California
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Posted 1/5/15
Since it's already taking place the only good things I heard were that the SAT would become more passable for students so they would be able to have more opportunities in college or attend in the first place
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19 / F / USA
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Posted 1/5/15
I feel like common core is useful to a point, and beyond that students should be able to get a general focus in one area of study.
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F / Edo
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Posted 1/5/15
I don't like it..... I took the common core test last year.. and everyone wanted the old system back (which was STAR testing for us). Also the common core thing kind of ruined math for me.
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48 / M / New England, USA
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Posted 1/6/15

Awaken_Riceball_ wrote:

2. The first link is related to what I stated. I know to much homework is bad and there needs to be a balance. When I was in Public school, homework was assigned daily and usually due the next day. The other link is controversial as I will disagree based on experience, and it does not specify what type of homework are assigned and the amount of time to complete the assignment. As the Washington Article states, "(Thus, a headline that reads “Study finds homework boosts achievement” can be translated as “A relentless regimen of after-school drill-and-skill can raise scores a wee bit on tests of rote learning.”)" which supports my original post before replying to yours, "Teach for the test." To clarify what types of homework, I mean, homework related to teach for the test or homework with meaning. In addition, most homework are given a grade without any feedback; therefore, what is the point to do homework for teachers who provide no feedback?

3. Misread original post. Your reply is related to exposure. A student's chosen career path should be exposed to it to gain the motivation to what it takes to become what they desire because many students who are graduating High School are undecided what career path to chose upon entering college. Unemployment rising rates has little or no relations to school system. Section 8 will explain a lot or should I say, living on government; yet, driving a Lexus.


2. On this point I think we'll have to agree to disagree on the merits of "homework" as I always found group study time in study halls more rewarding when working with people on the same career paths as yourself. I must agree that a lot of this may have to do with the state of most teachers out there (as I mentioned before I think "tenure" is an archaic concept that needs to be abolished; maybe that in itself would make the difference.

3. Exactly! Exposure is what I'm talking about. Most students today graduate with no clear career path in mind due to not being exposed to "real world skills" before graduation. In school we took "tests" to tell us what jobs we were "best suited for". They never asked us what fields of study interested us. There was no individuality. Most of the people I went to school with had no clue which directions to take. I'd say 10% at most had chosen career paths after graduation.


--------------------

serifsansserif wrote:


You underestimate how much science and math is used in even the most basic jobs. A trade like plumbing or electrical requires a lot more understanding of what chemicals you might be playing with, with plumbing geometry for angles and fittings, electrical work requires understanding how metals behave and react to electrical charge, etc. Woordworking, building a house, etc? all require sciences and math. perhaps not calculus, be geometry and trig are definitely something people don't think they need (but use all the time).

Homework... ehhh.. it's at least important I suppose to give assignments for the students to work on their own.

As for everything outside of core math/science/english being an elective, I've been there. 2 years of science and 3 years of math were all that were require in HS. (4 years english). I of course took more...


Yes, but in the same respect, if someone's chosen path is journalism, art, music or even bookkeeping/accounting most later sciences (biology,chemistry) and maths (trig, calc) become an extra burden unrelated to thier chosen path. That's why I could clearly see then as related electives to the career directions you pointed out. While I suggest the concept of mandatory and elective classes I still support the concept of a necessary amount of credits to graduate. I just don't think those credits should have to be classes that fail to teach anything pertinent to the individual student's chosen career path.

As for homework, I touched on it above but I'll elaborate a little more. In my school days we tended to get more out of working together using each others strengths and weaknesses to answer the questions we had due to teachers being too disinterested to answer our questions. A bunch of us (many who never met before) in a library at school or an auditorium study hall asking each other how things were done with no shame or guilt (unlike what a lot of teachers would give if you asked a question that thought was "too stupid" for them to answer). My best teachers had a belief. "Read chapter (blank)" they'd say, "we may or may not have a quiz on it tomorrow". There was no quiz more often than not but we'd get together in study hall discussing the chapters trying to figure "what exactly" would be on the possible quiz. By the time we were through we'd understand everything in the chapter. There were examples to study, sample problems/questions to try but no mandatory graded homework. To this day I honestly feel those are the teachers I owe the most to despite the fact there were (and still are) very few of them out there comparted to the ones who are just there to kill time, for a power trip, or "the old-timers" who are there for the safety of the job.

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23 / M / Saint Charles, Mi...
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Posted 1/6/15
I am against common core. Two of my aunts (one teaches fourth grade and the other fifth grade), and one of my cousins (fifth grade teacher), are teachers, and I have been able to talk it over with them. My Aunts do not like the system as a whole, and my cousin likes the concept but believes it is too complicated. To describe it in short format; it is like teaching sarcasm, to an extent, my aunt described teaching basic division. You have to divide 108 by six. But you couldn't use a long division equation. You had to draw pictures and circles and if you got the answer (eighteen) wrong, as long as you could "describe" you thinking and why the answer you came up with is right (basically bull****ing your way through it) you would get a "correct" on the test... Now Math is a set science, there is right and wrong, why teach that being wrong is acceptable (in a clear presented set of circumstances, case by case people not talking or presuming civil issues here but the concept can relate or transition over) if you can convince someone you are right? I digress.
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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15
The japonese consistantly rank in the top 5 in math science and reading. Common core has left the us at 20th and falling. Rather than trying to reinvent the wheel. Perhapse we should copy what works in the rest of the world
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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/6/15
Of course that would also require lazy assed american parrents pull their head out of their self centired asses and start taking responsibiliy for their offspring.
Reproduction is not a right it is a responsibility.
Currently the standards for owning and operateing a car are higher than creating and raising a human being...think about that
Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/6/15
Its been awhile, but I debated over a similar thread , in great length I might add, over the banality of tracking in schools. While it is true that not everyone is of the same ability, its painful to watch as youth that, for one reason or another don't live up to their true potential and get in adverse situations because they didn't , or could not at one point show promise -- ashamed to admit after a lot of time and reflection on the subject I don't have the answer. On the one hand, no one should be left behind, on another its unrealistic to expect everyone to succeed (moreover want to succeed)or attain equality with their peers. In all I think there should be more safeguards in place for students unable to catch up but not in such a manner that would hinder others .

The problem imho is at the collegiate/university level. They should be more inclusive of atypical students so they can find and reach their true potentials. The other question would be how to get the money to balance the budgets to finance the programs to acheive this outcome.
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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15

symphonicecho wrote:

Its been awhile, but I debated over a similar thread , in great length I might add, over the banality of tracking in schools. While it is true that not everyone is of the same ability, its painful to watch as youth that, for one reason or another don't live up to their true potential and get in adverse situations because they didn't , or could not at one point show promise -- ashamed to admit after a lot of time and reflection on the subject I don't have the answer. On the one hand, no one should be left behind, on another its unrealistic to expect everyone to succeed (moreover want to succeed)or attain equality with their peers. In all I think there should be more safeguards in place for students unable to catch up but not in such a manner that would hinder others .

The problem imho is at the collegiate/university level. They should be more inclusive of atypical students so they can reach their true potentials. The other question would be how to get the money to balance the budgets to finance the programs to acheive this outcome. [/quote
The child.doesn't stand a chance in hell if their parrents do not take an active interest i. Their education. I have sisters who are teachers and 100% of sucusefull students have parents who take a proactive roll in their childs education

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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15
If as a parrent you sit back and expect someone else will raise and educate your child without ur input...you are setting your child up for failure.
Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/6/15
I noticed you added to (doctored) my quotes, somewhat curious of that. You're right. Both are problems.
I like being mocked as much as the next cat so I'll pass on the rebuttal. However, we never brought up parenting per se, the education system and what goes on at home are not one and the same. Not everyone gets the honour and privlege of a private school or a private education, but the again well, not all of us are aware of that little tidbit of info.


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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15
symphonicecho Interesting that you are the only one fabricating quotes. Everyone is free to scroll up and see mine. Of course that will expose that complete fabrication you just posted
Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/6/15
I did it to show you how obnoxious it was to troll in such a manner, not to emulate you, senpai.
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44 / M / Verginia
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Posted 1/6/15 , edited 1/6/15
And again..how is saying parrents are responsible for their offspring trolling vs your random pile of un related troll poop?
I will leave you with this kick ass vid of a japonese girl rocking the gutar...music is not part of the common core
http://youtu.be/f1Ob9IGLlbk
And this is the product of japan's commitment to music education. Something completely eliminated from the common core.
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22 / M
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Posted 1/6/15
Either way, kids are going to learn different things no matter what the standard is. Different teachers, different school systems. Can't really expect everyone to be taught the same thing.
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