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Post Reply Did your parents choose what major to study?
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31 / M / That place beyond...
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Posted 1/18/15
Well...It's true our parents want the best for us, but sometimes when it comes to study a major, we want to study something completely different from what our parents want.
What do you think about this?
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33 / M / Baltimore, MD
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Posted 1/18/15
Not for me. I became passionate about chemistry in high school and chemical engineering became the logical choice for me when I went to college.
Sogno- 
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Posted 1/18/15
um unless they are paying for your schooling i don't see why they'd even bother. you can make your own choice regardless of what they want. and if they refuse to pay for your school because you won't study what they want, then pay your own way.
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24 / F / United States, DE
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Posted 1/18/15
When I was younger, I wanted to be a nurse like my mother, but I soon realized that my passion was with taking care of animals rather than people.

Currently I am looking to start a career in the poultry industry, and have even thought about becoming a USDA inspector.

So no, while my parents did influence my career at first, they did not choose it for me.
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25 / M
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Posted 1/18/15
Having your parents decide your path in this day and age is an outdated concept. They influenced the decision in regards to the books they let me read as I grew up/ the movies I watched but that's it.
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52 / M / Madison, Wi
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Posted 1/18/15
the path my brother and i took surprised Mom and Dad. They thought my brother was going to become a music educator and instead he went on to study chemical engineering. he still plays a lot of gigs with his R&B band.
Both of my parents were in the navy. They did NOT push me to join. pop was going to pay my way through school and was getting the paper work set up when i told him i was joining the Navy. I did not study to be a Corpman, but Boilers and electric generation (MM). Pop was shocked to hear this.
As for the my kids that grown up (one still lives at home) i did not choose their path. They did it on their own. (They are into nursing)
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22 / F
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Posted 1/18/15
No, my parents let me decide for myself and stood behind my decisions, including my choice of university, when my high school teachers started questioning it. The most they did was offer suggestions for what they thought I might like when I first started thinking about possible majors, and that was just to help me brainstorm and consider my options. Once I decided, that was that.
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F / California
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Posted 1/18/15 , edited 1/18/15
Absolutely not. Once you reach the age of choosing a major in college you should already have some idea of the kind of career you plan to achieve. If you don't know by the time you reach 16-19 yrs of age you are probably not spending enuff time getting to know yourself. Your parents should encourage you to discover your own plan. Even if your parents are paying for your entire education, they should be happy to help you achieve your dreams. Doctors and attorneys are no longer the only types of careers that offer success. Doing what you love is the ideal career to achieve and possibly attain success — as long as you enjoy your work you are likely to improve and master your skills, as you age.


"Overspecialize and you breed in weakness" —Major Kusanagi, Ghost In The Shell
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28 / M / Canada
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Posted 1/18/15
My parents gave me a lot of freedom. They were just happy that I was so interested in education. I think they're probably a little disappointed that I didn't choose a more lucrative major (I did English Lit), but they know I took it because it's what I like, and they've never tried to push me into anything else.
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41 / M
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Posted 1/18/15
Let's say that your mother or father is a partner in a law firm and want you to take over the business- but only if you get a law degree. Or maybe they are doctors working at their private clinic.

Probably these would be some cases where your parents would like you to study a particular field, but chances are they will still tell you to go study what you want.
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29 / M
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Posted 1/18/15
Depends if your parents are financially and economically literate. If they are, you shouldn't resist their decision.You may not like studying accounting, medicine, or physics, but getting a worthless degree just because you are passionate about it is a bad decision. Either make the commitment to research the types of employment available and their genuine feasibility, or don't bother with college and get a job straight out of high-school. If your parents aren't financially/economically literate, then the odds are they aren't pushing you in a particular direction anyways, other than to just go to college for it's own sake (which is a terrible idea).

Trust me, I'm an unemployed economist.
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26 / M / Connecticut
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Posted 1/18/15

hbvmmviii wrote:

Absolutely not. Once you reach the age of choosing a major in college you should already have some idea of the kind of career you plan to achieve. If you don't know by the time you reach 16-19 yrs of age you are probably not spending enuff time getting to know yourself. Your parents should encourage you to discover your own plan. Even if your parents are paying for your entire education, they should be happy to help you achieve your dreams. Doctors and attorneys are no longer the only types of careers that offer success. Doing what you love is the ideal career to achieve and possibly attain success — as long as you enjoy your work you are likely to improve and master your skills, as you age.


"Overspecialize and you breed in weakness" —Major Kusanagi, Ghost In The Shell


I had this problem and my father knew it. He always told me "accounting, engineering, nursing, or pre med were the only things worth studying, everything else is a waste of time." I didn't listen and now, looking back on my decisions, I understand what he meant by that smh
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31 / M / That place beyond...
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Posted 1/18/15

Mugen417 wrote:


hbvmmviii wrote:

Absolutely not. Once you reach the age of choosing a major in college you should already have some idea of the kind of career you plan to achieve. If you don't know by the time you reach 16-19 yrs of age you are probably not spending enuff time getting to know yourself. Your parents should encourage you to discover your own plan. Even if your parents are paying for your entire education, they should be happy to help you achieve your dreams. Doctors and attorneys are no longer the only types of careers that offer success. Doing what you love is the ideal career to achieve and possibly attain success — as long as you enjoy your work you are likely to improve and master your skills, as you age.


"Overspecialize and you breed in weakness" —Major Kusanagi, Ghost In The Shell


I had this problem and my father knew it. He always told me "accounting, engineering, nursing, or pre med were the only things worth studying, everything else is a waste of time." I didn't listen and now, looking back on my decisions, I understand what he meant by that smh

I had that same problem, my dad thinks only engineering and business administration have value. He still thinks that everything related with the arts is nothing but a hobby, but I disagree there are lots of people that work as painters, actors, actress, because love what they do.
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21 / M / The Heroes Associ...
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Posted 1/18/15
Fuck no. As if im going to study what they want me too.

I mean, my goals in university are pretty high anyway; so it was never a problem. They would have probably objected if i wanted to get a bachelors of art.

I'm currently going to university for a Bachelors in Commerce (That also doubles as a course with credentials in IT since its a course that is business and IT related)

I'm also taking Politics and sciences as my electives.

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26 / M / Connecticut
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Posted 1/18/15

ludoplex wrote:

Depends if your parents are financially and economically literate. If they are, you shouldn't resist their decision.You may not like studying accounting, medicine, or physics, but getting a worthless degree just because you are passionate about it is a bad decision. Either make the commitment to research the types of employment available and their genuine feasibility, or don't bother with college and get a job straight out of high-school. If your parents aren't financially/economically literate, then the odds are they aren't pushing you in a particular direction anyways, other than to just go to college for it's own sake (which is a terrible idea).

Trust me, I'm an unemployed economist.


Sorry to hear that, but I completely agree. Following your parents advice versus following your passion really depends on who ever has a better understanding on the economy as a whole

However, even financial literate parents understand that basket weaving majors have their own strengths. These degrees require less study hours, compared to the more rigorous fields that you've mentioned. Therefore these parents allow their kids to study their passion as long as they network network network. Plus they understand that these degrees require internships and extra curricular activities to acquire the skills that employers seek from passion driven majors, like the liberal arts. A lot of naive students, who want to study their passion, don't take advantage of these because they're not aware of how competitive the job market is until it is too late.

This situation places students coming from financially strapped families at a disadvantage, and are left on the hook come graduation time when they can't find a job with a student loan looming over their head. In my opinion, universities need to put more skin in the game, and begin taking more responsibility of the success of their alumni and not just rely on the advice from the parents.


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