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先生
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Posted 2/19/15
Happy Chinese New Year's everyone! Is anyone doing anything to celebrate?
先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 2/19/15
I've had classes today so not many occasions to celebrate :S The usual stuff~
漢和名手
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Posted 2/19/15
今日ですか?忘れちゃった、とても忙しかったし。。。
先生
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Posted 2/20/15
Me too, I really haven't had the chance to celebrate Chinese New Year But next Saturday, the local mall is hosting an event so I'll let you guys know how it goes if I do go to it (which I'm planning to!). They said they're going to have traditional dances, red envelope giveaways (i wonder what the giveaway will be) and music performances! I'm really excited~ I love sheep, they're my favorite animal, so it makes me happy this is the year of the sheep!

Nowadays, I don't listen to music in English, but I remember this music video from way back when, when I used to like Jared Leto (since some of his music videos are really well done!) Anyway, in the spirit of Chinese New Year, I wanted to share this music video of Jared Leto's song "From Yesterday" with all of you, I think it was an incredibly well done video, the directing is just awesome! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpG7FzXrNSs
漢和名手
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Posted 2/20/15
「紅包」というのは大抵現金を入れられます。でもそのイベントには多分現金じゃないでしょう。
百芸
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Posted 2/23/15
でも現金を取り得るといいでしょう。
百芸
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Posted 2/27/15
March is almost here. I sure hope things warm up for us in the northern hemisphere. :D

I also heard about an interesting Polish expression. Apparently the way to say "not my problem" translates to "not my circus not my monkeys". I wonder if MidorikaSatsu uses this expression.
先輩(Moderator)
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Posted 2/27/15
Not really using it that often, but I'm familiar with it
I think you could also say "my circus, my monkeys" when you mean to say "it's my business (and not yours)". Heard it at least once.
先生
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Posted 2/27/15
I definitely agree-I think the newscasters here said it has been the 4th coldest February in history or something! I hope March brings us warm weather! And oh please do enlighten us senpai on that interesting expression!

Tomorrow is the Chinese New Year event at the mall! So I'll definitely let you guys know how it goes I hope everyone has a good weekend~
百芸
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Posted 3/2/15
So, how was the CNY celebration?
先生
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Posted 3/2/15 , edited 3/3/15
Sorry I haven't been active the last few days, I have a cold, but am feeling slightly better now! (Well at least well enough to type a lot!) Anyway when I went to the CNY celebration, I was feeling really sick, so I didn't enjoy it as much as I could have. But it was an amazing event! The first time my local mall head such an event! Ok, so I got there early, which is always a good idea to do because if there's one thing I learned from going to the local Japanese supermarket's festivals was that festivals/celebrations tend to get crowded really fast. So the first thing I did was check out the various tables, where people were promoting their services. The first person I went to was this skilled Chinese man who specialized in paper cutting. You should've seen how he was able to create anything out of paper and scissors. He created a paper hat with Spongebob for a young kid! I first greeted him 您好 (a polite "hello" in Chinese) and asked him to make me a red paper dragon. I never knew that paper cutting was considered an art in China. Here's a wikipedia article about it if anyone is interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_paper_cutting Then, I moved onto the next table which was an old Korean man who was am aster calligrapher! I first stood there in awe seeing how he held the brush and how he so elegantly moved it on the paper (I love sumi and Asian calligraphy) and then his student was there and said I can request a drawing for free and you should've seen how happy I was- my face was like this It turned out he made 3 things for me- one of them has my name in Korean, another has some saying and my name too, and another was a beautiful picture of some flowers with calligraphy, but the flower picture was the only one he stamped with his chop/inkan/hanko (whatever it is called ) Then I walked around some more before the festivities began. There were tons of people with cameras taking pictures--even with DSLR cameras and oh! KBN (Korean Broadcast Network) was there too! The performances were like 90% Korean since I live in an area with way more Koreans than Chinese. There were kids from the local Korean Christian church singing, a lion dance, a face changer (Man, that guy was amazing! I never heard of "face changing" before! But here's a wikipedia article on it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bian_lian ). The local Korean Church senior women's choir was there and before their performance when they were in the seated areas they were nice enough to pose for a picture for me--they were really nice women! But out of respect for them, I won;t post their pictures here! Hmm...what else? Oh yeah, there were Korean girls playing the drums, which was very similar to the various Tanko performances I saw at the Japanese supermarket. And there was also Korean girls doing a fan flower dance--it's hard to describe it, but they moved their fans in such a way that the fans resembled flower petals. It was really beautiful! Then that was it! I was planning to have steamed vegetables and a side of white rice in the food court but by the time the whole event was over, my cold caught up to me In the advertisement for the event they said there was going to be a "Red envelope giveaway" But I never found where that giveaway was All I know is that I am happy to have some pictures done by a master calligrapher and that I definitely need to buy some frames for them so I can hang them up in my room!

Since St. Patrick's Day is coming up soon, is anyone planning to do anything special?

Here's two pictures of the crafts I received (Sorry I don't have any pictures of the actual performances, they're all on my DSLR and I'm way too lazy to download all of the pictures off that camera )


If anyone can tell me what is says on here, I'd appreciate it so much! And the writing is Chinese, isn't it? Because the other two pictures I have are definitely in Hangul)


I tried to get a good picture of this paper dragon but I'm sorry the bottom part of the picture cut off! It was difficult taking a picture of it with one hand because the dragon and the white paper it's in wanted to keep on closing
百芸
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Posted 3/4/15
Wow. Sounds like an amazing experience. And the art you got is beautiful!
漢和名手
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Posted 3/5/15 , edited 3/5/15
Cursive Chinese is a challenge to read, especially for a foreign learner like me.

The right-most four characters, 謹賀新年 is wishing you a happy new year- a fairly commonly seen four-character fixed phrase.

The next four I'm going to have to stare at for a while at some time-- maybe I can make it out eventually.

The three characters immediately to the left of the flower drawing are 己未冬. An ancient method of "enumerating" years uses the 10 heavenly stems (天干) and 12 terrestrial branches (地支) to create an ever-repeating 60 year cycle. 2015 is 己未 (ji3 wei4), and 冬 is the winter (dong1).

I'm going to have to stare at the last two left-most characters too.

Edit: Nope... Can't figure out those other characters. It's somewhat likely, though, that the left two characters are the calligrapher's name. The two red seals nearby may also be the calligrapher's name, including a "pen name."
先生
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Posted 3/6/15
Thank you so much Sushi-san for even attempting to translate the calligraphy! The only thing the calligrapher said is that he wrote "Happy New Year". I wanted to ask him more, but his English was very limited Still it's amazing that he can do both Korean and Chinese calligraphy!

Do you know if ancient Japan used that repeating 60-year cycle you described? Also, what does 己未 mean by itself? Like, I'm used to seeing 2015 as represented by 2015年, so how does 己未 represent the year 2015?

I also assume that the two seals on the left hand side are either the calligrapher's name and/or his pen name, but do you know what the middle seal on the top of the picture is? (If you want me to take a better picture of this calligraphy piece please let me know! :D)

Once again, thank you so much for your knowledge Sushi-san!
漢和名手
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Posted 3/6/15
China was the dominant culture and power in Asia for so long, and being able to do things the Chinese way was long a mark of education, culture, and class, I'm pretty sure the 60-year cycle was used in Japan too. It's probably not very commonly used nowadays, though-- even in China and other Chinese communities, if you ask someone what year is it, they're going to say "2015." I've only seen it used in calligraphy or other artwork, or on fancy calendars.

The 10 heavenly stems, and 12 terrestrial branches are as follows:

A 甲 1 子
B 乙 2 丑
C 丙 3 寅
D 丁 4 卯
E 戊 5 辰
F 己 6 巳
G 庚 7 午
H 辛 8 未
I 壬 9 申
J 癸 10 酉
11 戌
12 亥
The first year in the cycle is A1, or 甲子. The second year is B2 or 乙丑. The 10th year is J10 or 癸酉. For the 11th year, one starts back at A again, but continues with 11, so A11 or 甲戌, and so on. When was "year zero" when the cycle first started?-- I don't know. Nonetheless, year zero is a fixed point some time way back when, and the current year 2015 just happens to be 己未. By itself, 己未 doesn't mean anything really-- it's equivalent to saying F8.

If you want to post a larger photo of the seal in question, I'll give it my best shot. Of the two presumed name seals on the left side, the bottom one is 南齋, which I suspect is a pen-name. The one above it with four characters is, I'm guessing, the calligrapher's actual name. The first (upper right) and fourth (lower left) characters respectively are 金 and 南, and I suspect he used the last character of his name to help create his pen-name. I'm not sure what the second and third characters are. The two very cursive characters in black above the presumed name seals-- I rather guess they're his pen-name as well. The first character seems to be 南. However I'm having a very hard time relating the second character to 齋, which kind of throws a wrench into my theory. The other wrench is that four-character names are rather rare in Chinese, as well as Korean, I'm told (by my wife, who's Korean)-- in contrast, four character names are very common for Japanese. Perusal of lists of Korean last names, I can't find any two-character names that begin with 金. So, maybe I'm completely wrong on all this!

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