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Post Reply Do you know Definition?
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23 / M / New York
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Posted 1/24/15
do you know definition of all the words? what the words meaning?
for me Not at all
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Posted 1/24/15
I know the definition for every single word.

Every one.

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23 / M / New York
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Posted 1/24/15

Lowlights wrote:

I know the definition for every single word.

Every one.


i'm the only one who don't know
Posted 1/24/15

Sagenaruto68 wrote:

i'm the only one who don't know


*throws you a dictionary*

Get to it, then.
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Posted 1/24/15
words are to create distinctions. Definitions are explanations of those distinctions. The more words one has, the better one is equipped to recognize and make those distinctions.
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Posted 1/24/15

xDeadlyDollx wrote:


Sagenaruto68 wrote:

i'm the only one who don't know


*throws you a dictionary*

Get to it, then.

*Thanks*
i have read many times i still can't remember
i think something wrong
Posted 1/24/15
I don't know every single definition for every single word, but I do know some.
Posted 1/24/15

Sagenaruto68 wrote:

*Thanks*
i have read many times i still can't remember
i think something wrong


Best way to remember word definition / usage is really to read.. a lot! The more you read, the more you encounter words and how they are used in different sentences. You never really need a dictionary if you can easily use context clues to decipher what the word means.
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Posted 1/24/15

xDeadlyDollx wrote:


Sagenaruto68 wrote:

*Thanks*
i have read many times i still can't remember
i think something wrong


Best way to remember word definition / usage is really to read.. a lot! The more you read, the more you encounter words and how they are used in different sentences. You never really need a dictionary if you can easily use context clues to decipher what the word means.


I disagree. Somewhat. :S

I think experience plays a huge part as well. It's like being blind and knowing red without having experienced it.
Posted 1/24/15

serifsansserif wrote:

I disagree. Somewhat. :S

I think experience plays a huge part as well. It's like being blind and knowing red without having experienced it.


I don't understand what you mean.

People often misuse words in verbal communication. Hell, most people don't even know how to pronounce a lot of them properly. Also, a blind person does not know red in the essence of how a person who can see knows red. A blind person would know that red as a street sign/light means stop. The idea of how that same color can express anger or passion would not be grasped without having seen it used to illustrate such emotions. This is what I think.

I think this is pretty useful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc6cfJztR8A
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Posted 1/24/15
Never have to remember definitions while I read. The cool thing about an amazon kindle is when you highlight a word, the definition automatically pops up under it. Makes my life SO easy.
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Posted 1/24/15

xDeadlyDollx wrote:


serifsansserif wrote:

I disagree. Somewhat. :S

I think experience plays a huge part as well. It's like being blind and knowing red without having experienced it.


I don't understand what you mean.

People often misuse words in verbal communication. Hell, most people don't even know how to pronounce a lot of them properly. Also, a blind person does not know red in the essence of how a person who can see knows red. A blind person would know that red as a street sign/light means stop. The idea of how that same color can express anger or passion would not be grasped without having seen it used to illustrate such emotions. This is what I think.

I think this is pretty useful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc6cfJztR8A


haven't watched the video yet... I think what your saying is reaffirming my point. Originally you said that reading a lot is the best way to gain words, but now you mention people misusing words as well as mispronouncing them, as well as the limited use of those words are without first hand experience of what they are defining, i.e. the essence of redness. It's through experience of the things that the words define that we grok them.

(A little meta here: It's funny that the word "grok" came to us only in the past 70 years (?) from a science fiction writer that understood that we have no word in the english language to differentiate the two forms of "knowing". In German and I'm sure a few others they definitely make a point of having two words, one of which applies more to knowing specific concrete facts, and another, more experiential knowledge, such as to know a person or have experience of it, as "grok" does.)

I think it's important to be able to associate personal experience of a word with the word in question, otherwise full understanding of it cannot be reached.
Posted 1/24/15 , edited 1/24/15



not really sure what you're trying to ask.

but the obvious answer would be No.
Some words I have difficulty remembering the definitions of... and I have to double check the definition via dictionary.com before using that word. If my definition was wrong, then I just use a simpler word :D


________________

In my opinion, it's not about what words you use, it's about ideas in your writing.

Words, grammar, punctuations... only accessorise your ideas... they don't make your ideas any more useful. They only make your writing accurate or precise. But honestly, you shouldn't worry too much about fitting a million words into your head. If you can't remember a complex word, just use basic words to communicate.
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Posted 1/24/15 , edited 1/24/15
I'm learning new words and definitions everyday. For example, in swedish dictionary, they implemented Zlatanera as a word in 2012, which means to dominate or something. This words is derived from the famous footballer.. What a guy! My wisdom infinitely increases!
Posted 1/24/15 , edited 1/24/15

serifsansserif wrote:

haven't watched the video yet... I think what your saying is reaffirming my point. Originally you said that reading a lot is the best way to gain words, but now you mention people misusing words as well as mispronouncing them, as well as the limited use of those words are without first hand experience of what they are defining, i.e. the essence of redness. It's through experience of the things that the words define that we grok them.

(A little meta here: It's funny that the word "grok" came to us only in the past 70 years (?) from a science fiction writer that understood that we have no word in the english language to differentiate the two forms of "knowing". In German and I'm sure a few others they definitely make a point of having two words, one of which applies more to knowing specific concrete facts, and another, more experiential knowledge, such as to know a person or have experience of it, as "grok" does.)

I think it's important to be able to associate personal experience of a word with the word in question, otherwise full understanding of it cannot be reached.


I see your point, and to that I can somewhat agree. However, I still think that literature is generally the best way of improving one's vocabulary. Especially now that most people's vocabulary consist of few overused expressions, tons of abbreviations (including intentionally misspelled words due to laziness and character limitations), and plenty of often crude and/or unintelligible slang.

I, personally, learned the English language thanks to having read every single volume of encyclopedia we had at home when I was a child. Also thanks to my mom's boss who always gave me more books to read whenever I went to their office. To this day people still think I was born in America and lived here my entire life when the truth is, my family didn't move to America until I was 17 and graduated from high school. English is not my first language and yet when they had me take an entrance test for college, I scored higher in reading and writing than the other kids who've been living in America and speaking English all their lives. Heh... So yeah, from my experience, reading is best for improving vocabulary.
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