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Post Reply A brief history of mankind and his likely future.
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26 / M / Waterloo, Ontario
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Posted 2/1/15
I discovered this website which is pretty interesting. It has a brief excerpt which perfectly describes the history and likely future of mankind.

http://sivatherium.narod.ru/library/Dixon/ch_01_en.htm

The especially important part is the highlighted area. Focus on the bolded and underlined parts.


The first men were plant gatherers and animal hunters and differed little in life style from other herbivorous and the carnivorous animals around them. They had sufficient intellect to devise tools and weapons and a social organization that made hunting and food gathering more efficient. Neither of these things, however, made any serious impact on the environment.

The first great change in their life style came when, instead of hunting and gathering animals and plants they brought them together and looked after them in a single location. This eliminated the element of danger present in hunting and reduced the probability of starvation, as there was no longer the possibility of returning empty-handed from a foraging expedition. It was the beginning of agriculture.

The evolution of man can be traced from an ape-like ancestor through hominids such as Australopithecus and early members of his own genus such as Homo erectus. Cro-magnon man, an early form of the species Homo sapiens itself, appeared in Europe towards the end of the Pleistocene ice ages. Man's skull developed from a massive structure containing a small brain into one of lighter bones encasing a large cerebral cavity. Man's large brain gave him the power of conscious thought and separated him from the rest of the animal kingdom.

At first the areas under cultivation were small and relatively insignificant. However, the improvements to early man's way of life were so dramatic that his populations increased markedly and more and more land had to be cleared of its natural vegetation to make room for crops and grazing animals.

As man's ingenuity and tool-making ability grew, he invented industrial processes that could produce tools with greater speed and less trouble than before. This inevitably involved heat, and forests were cut down to supply wood and mountainsides were dug away to reach coal to provide fuel. Within a few thousand years the landscape of the earth was changed out of all recognition.

Man's knowledge grew, most significantly in the field of medical science. Accidents and diseases that help to keep natural populations in check were overcome or reduced in their effects by man's endeavours. Genetic defects that, in the wild, would have proved fatal and would have been eliminated by natural selection were perpetuated because their possessors were allowed to live and reproduce. World population increased exponentially and hardly a region of the earth's surface remained untouched by man.

The ultimate effect was that, whereas other animals change and adapt through the slow process of evolution to fit into their environment, man was able to change his environment to suit his current needs, reaping a short-term advantage in the process. Living outside evolution each stage in his rapid cultural development was passed on to the next generation, not through his genes but by learning. Although he avoided the unpleasant effects of natural selection, he also did without its long-term benefits and in short called a halt to evolution as it applied to himself. The result was a world overburdened by a population of beings unable to survive without their own conscious intervention, a world given over to the essential needs of man, a world poisoned by his waste.

Ultimately the earth could no longer supply the raw materials needed for man's agriculture, industry or medicine, and as shortage of supply caused the collapse of one structure after another, his whole complex and interlocking social and technological edifice crumbled. Man, no longer able to adapt, rushed uncontrollably to his inevitable extinction.

With the dominant life form gone the animal world entered a period of evolutionary chaos that lasted tens of thousands of years. However, man's extinction provided the impetus for the formation of many new species of animals and his disappearance was of fundamental importance in shaping the world that has emerged 50 million years later.


Basically mankind's population will keep on increasing until the world runs out of natural resources. There is not enough natural resources to support the population, so human kind becomes extinct from resource depletion. That's the worst case scenario. If we were lucky, we might keep on increasing population until a mass die-off happens. Then most of the population (perhaps as much as 90 to 95%) is gone with a few remaining survivors. I believe the second scenario is more likely because I still have some hope for mankind.

But it is also possible that both scenarios happen. First, mankind's population goes into overshoot. There are too many people. The population experiences a die-off. 90 to 95% of the population is dead. And then the reminding population continue to experience future population overshoots and die-offs over the next couple of millennia. Every cycle of population overshoot and die-off will make the Earth less and less inhabitable. Until the Earth becomes so uninhabitable that mankind eventually becomes extinct.

Good riddance to the cancer of the planet. Mankind is in fact a cancer to this planet. We do nothing but destroy all other species on this planet for our own self-fish greed. Human population keeps on growing to fulfill the manifest destiny of the Bible which is "be fruitful and multiply. Subdue the Earth and have domination over the land and fish." We've been doing this for the past couple of millennia and effectively rendering this Earth into a toxic wasteland. Indeed we became fruitful and multiplied. Resulting in the catastrophic destruction of all other organisms on this planet. But eventually the Earth will get rid of us. As the Earth's biosphere dies, we end up destroying our own life support system. We cannot live separately from nature. Nature is a part of us because nature created us. We are animals evolved from other animals. If we destroy nature, we end up destroying ourselves in the end because we are dependent on nature for our survival.

You can either ignore this message and keep on increasing population and consumption until we become extinct. Or we can smarten up and stop increasing population and give our species a chance of surviving in the long-term.

I'm certainly not the only person with this view point. Daniel Quinn also makes this point very clear. Watch the following video.

Ishmael author Daniel Quinn: Saving the World, Moving Beyond Civilization: Part 1 of 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhFw6frrGrU

Many environmentalists have been warning of this upcoming catastrophe. Yet people around the world ignore them. We continue to increase population and consumption, until the die-off and extinction event happens. If only there were more wise people on this planet like me, who realize how screwed we will be if we continue business as usual.

Imagine what the world would be like if we doubled population again. I can't imagine what it would be like. The burden of the incredibly large human population is already causing catastrophic environmental damage on this planet. With another doubling of population, we are likely to become extinct as a species.

Facts are on my side. I have graphs and other data that support the view that humanity is on a run-away train leading to his own destruction. Do I need to show graphs of human population again? There are other graphs I can show, but the graph of human population is the only graph I need to show.
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Posted 2/1/15
Inevitable oblivion, occurring at an undetermined point in time.

Likelihood: 100%
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20 / M / England
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Posted 2/1/15
Disregard Earth, Acquire Mars

On a serious note, Depopulation is almost certainly going to be a inevitably occurrence, weather be on purpose or by nature will yet be determined.
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26 / M / Canada
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Posted 2/1/15
Thanks for the amusing read. -Desu

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26 / M / Waterloo, Ontario
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Posted 2/1/15

DeliriumOxide wrote:

Inevitable oblivion, occurring at an undetermined point in time.

Likelihood: 100%


Mankind is like a cancer on this planet. Instead of peacefully coexisting with all of the other organisms on this planet, we destroy their habitats in order to continue to increase our population. We continue to increase our population and overburden this planet. Thereby causing other animals to become extinct.

We've been doing this for millennia. For example, Europeans caused the wolf and lion to become extinct in Europe. We caused the megafauna around the world during the Pleistocene to become extinct. But our impact on this planet was relatively minor until the agricultural revolution. Our population starts to increase slowly because of agriculture.

And then the Industrial Revolution came. We discovered oil. And boom the population quadrupedals in one century. With the discovery of oil, our population increases so rapidly that we end up destroying the majority of the species on this planet. The Earth's landscape is indeed changed beyond all recognition. There are over 7 billion of us. And the impact we have on this planet is enormous. Our sheer numbers alone is enough to overwhelm the biosphere of this planet, and thus cause the extinction of countless species.

According to Michael Ruppert, human population was relatively flat throughout most of human history. And then we discovered oil in the 1900s and BOOM the population starts growing on a vertical trajectory.

Eventually our sheer numbers becomes a burden to even ourselves. We overwhelm ourselves with our sheer population, resulting in a die-off of population. And possibly resulting even in an extinction of our species.

Remember. All species eventually become extinct. Even the dinosaurs eventually became extinct. The dinosaurs were kings of their paradigm. They ruled the Earth for 160 million years. But they eventually became extinct too. Mankind is the current rulers of the Earth. We are, by far, the most dominant species on this planet, but even dominant species eventually become extinct. Nothing lasts forever.
Posted 2/1/15
Like I said, guys, we're all going to die. I just hope it doesn't happen while I'm alive...
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27 / M / Ark-La-Tex
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Posted 2/1/15
Don't you have another thread on this same subject? This guy is a strange case, to say the least.
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26 / M / Canada
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Posted 2/1/15

DesuMaiden wrote:


DeliriumOxide wrote:

Inevitable oblivion, occurring at an undetermined point in time.

Likelihood: 100%


Mankind is like a cancer on this planet. Instead of peacefully coexisting with all of the other organisms on this planet, we destroy their habitats in order to continue to increase our population. We continue to increase our population and overburden this planet. Thereby causing other animals to become extinct.

We've been doing this for millennia. For example, Europeans caused the wolf and lion to become extinct in Europe. We caused the megafauna around the world during the Pleistocene to become extinct. But our impact on this planet was relatively minor until the agricultural revolution. Our population starts to increase slowly because of agriculture.

And then the Industrial Revolution came. We discovered oil. And boom the population quadrupedals in one century. With the discovery of oil, our population increases so rapidly that we end up destroying the majority of the species on this planet. The Earth's landscape is indeed changed beyond all recognition. There are over 7 billion of us. And the impact we have on this planet is enormous. Our sheer numbers alone is enough to overwhelm the biosphere of this planet, and thus cause the extinction of countless species.

According to Michael Ruppert, human population was relatively flat throughout most of human history. And then we discovered oil in the 1900s and BOOM the population starts growing on a vertical trajectory.

Eventually our sheer numbers becomes a burden to even ourselves. We overwhelm ourselves with our sheer population, resulting in a die-off of population. And possibly resulting even in an extinction of our species.

Remember. All species eventually become extinct. Even the dinosaurs eventually became extinct. The dinosaurs were kings of their paradigm. They ruled the Earth for 160 million years. But they eventually became extinct too. Mankind is the current rulers of the Earth. We are, by far, the most dominant species on this planet, but even dominant species eventually become extinct. Nothing lasts forever.



Mankind is like a cancer on this planet. Instead of peacefully coexisting with all of the other organisms on this planet, we destroy their habitats in order to continue to increase our population. We continue to increase our population and overburden this planet. Thereby causing other animals to become extinct.
You don't know how much I agree with that.

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Posted 2/1/15
I swear all of your posts are always about the world dying and humanity going extinct..
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Posted 2/1/15

MontyDono wrote:

Disregard Earth, Acquire Mars

On a serious note, Depopulation is almost certainly going to be a inevitably occurrence, weather be on purpose or by nature will yet be determined.


It can either be voluntarily or involuntary depopulation. We can either choose to reduce our population to a lower level, so that other species on this planet have enough space for survival. Or we can keep on increasing population and then BOOM our population experiences overshoot and die-off.

We can either voluntarily choose to decrease population through birth control and reduction in birth rates below replacement levels. Or we can keep on increasing population until we experience a die-off where 90 to 95% of the population dies.

Will mankind eventually become extinct? Will we eventually end up as an evolutionary dead-end? That's certainly a possibility. But if smarten up and choose to stop population growth, we might survive into the future for millions of years as a species. That's the choice we are facing.

Either stop population growth or gradually reduce population . Or we can keep on increasing population until nature involuntarily decreases our population through war, famine, disease and resource depletion. I much rather choose the first option which requires contraception, family planning for small family size or just less reproduction in general. The second option is nasty. Millions and billions of people dying of starvation, famine, disease and war is not a pretty sight.

As Richard Heinberg once said,

""What we should focus on is reducing per capita consumption of resources. Also, we should gradually decrease human population by the most humane means we can muster. This is very difficult to do because the right to reproduce is a sacred right in the eyes of most people. Especially to the religious right winged. But this has to be done. There is no other way."

Watch this video where Richard Heinberg suggests as options for the survival of mankind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN9UXuaWBO4

It is possible for mankind to save itself, although it is most likely mankind will end up destroying himself.
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26 / M / Waterloo, Ontario
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Posted 2/1/15

geauxtigers1989 wrote:

Don't you have another thread on this same subject? This guy is a strange case, to say the least.


It is a brief history of mankind and our likely future. Of course, we can change our destiny if we know what lies ahead of us if we continue business as usual.

We can learn from history and not repeat the same mistakes again. Look at what happened to Easter Island. Their population went into overshoot and there was a die-off, as their population exceeded the carrying capacity of the environment. There were too many people on Easter Island. They were cutting down too many trees. All of the trees eventually disappeared on the island. Their lives depended on the trees. They couldn't live without the trees of the island. So the people experienced a die-off where 3/4 of their population disappeared over a span of a century.
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Posted 2/1/15
I don't think we'll die off completely to the last man. Species go extinct, yes, but most of the extinctions I know are the result of huge cataclysms or climate shifts, or, human interference. :P

The truth is, our population is outstripping our resources. Eventually, I do see a time where the industrialized and modern world simply says "GTFO" and abandons aide to developing or developed countries.

In most developed nations, population is on a slight decline. Enough that some worry about replacement rates. The biggest offenders of overpopulation are China and India, and quite frankly our biggest chance of decimating our population comes from disease ridden Africa. I honestly was rooting for Ebola to spread like wildfire east, hop from africa to the middle east, and then slowly flood into inda and china, massacring literally billions and giving us some breathing room. It sounds horrible, but honestly, I'd rather nature choose who lies or dies than my fellow man... Which may be the case if nature doesn't find a strong enough way to intervene...

Meanwhile, o the other end of the spectrum, our technology and awareness of our impact on the earth is slowly starting to change things. We've only recently in our history grasped the actual dimensions of our earth, having finally mapped it all out. only 525 years ago did we find out there were a whole 'nother three or four continents beyond europe, africa, and asia... (and they found out about us). We only just began to study world climate change in about the last 50 or so years....

And from then to now, we're starting to slowly (by our lifetime's standards anyhow) making changes... I wouldn't be surprised if in 125 years (of we make it 125 years without completely destroying the earth beyond human habitability and overpopulation) that we end up figuring out how to terraform our home planet to our needs. (meaning creating human serving ecosystems, ect). In 200 years time, we may, just MAY be finally able to start working on terraforming other planets.

We have alternative energy, we just haven't hit peak oil hard enough to be forced into using it. we have alternatives to plastic, we have biodegradables.. we have all the tools we need.. It's just not tangibly pressing upon us enough to use it yet.
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Posted 2/1/15 , edited 2/1/15

DesuMaiden wrote:


geauxtigers1989 wrote:

Don't you have another thread on this same subject? This guy is a strange case, to say the least.


It is a brief history of mankind and our likely future. Of course, we can change our destiny if we know what lies ahead of us if we continue business as usual.

We can learn from history and not repeat the same mistakes again. Look at what happened to Easter Island. Their population went into overshoot and there was a die-off, as their population exceeded the carrying capacity of the environment. There were too many people on Easter Island. They were cutting down too many trees. All of the trees eventually disappeared on the island. Their lives depended on the trees. They couldn't live without the trees of the island. So the people experienced a die-off where 3/4 of their population disappeared over a span of a century.


And you felt this needed a separate thread because?
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Posted 2/1/15

DesuMaiden wrote:


MontyDono wrote:

Disregard Earth, Acquire Mars

On a serious note, Depopulation is almost certainly going to be a inevitably occurrence, weather be on purpose or by nature will yet be determined.





I think the use of "Humane" options is out of the question with today's attitudes on well, anything, thing's would have to be forced unto the population

The continuing existence of an lifeform is defined by it's ability to reproduce, When that process becomes threatened, which it is by resources the species dies out, in our case we're in a position to actually find a solution and stick to it without coming to a abrupt end

With land becoming more and more confined by overpopulation, and the demand for meat production to double within 15 years, it really is now or never, by 2036 we need to make some form of decision, the chances of it being pretty are rather slim.

To view it statistically by consumption of resources and waste/enviromental damage is completely pointless, due to the population being too high to adjust sensibly.

Extinction of man seems far fetched, but civilised survival while respecting the slowly diminishing resources we have left is fragile at best.
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Posted 2/1/15
I envy all those who can just sit on their ass and talk about doomsday all day everyday. Must be nice to be able to waste all that time away.

Why haven't this thread been trolled to hell and back yet? This is like asking for epic trolls.
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