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Post Reply Do you think people should "self diagnose" mental conditions… and then claim they have them?
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29 / M / Atlanta, GA, USA
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Posted 2/8/15
It's pretty easy to flip through a psychology book and think we might have every disorder in it.

It doesn't really mean we have unstable high self esteem just because our pride is occasionally wounded and we go fishing for compliments, though. Severity and consistency is the issue.
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Posted 2/8/15
For more minor things I think it is okay in some aspects, but I dislike it for major disorders.
Especially personality disorders.
Children under 18 SHOULDN'T be saying they have personality disorders when personality disorders do not manifest till later, usually after adolescence or closer till its end. I'm 18 and I was just diagnosed with BPD in Nov. I have had violent urges since forever but they were far more amplified during what has been my latter teen years, in a BPD way. I'm more nonviolent than i used to be at 13 in some aspects but my violence when it happens is definitely more uncontrolled and rash. In other words, while in some ways I learned to control it slightly better my violent streak was amplified worsely by BPD. The problme is, early teens are so damn hormonal that you can't tell the difference between an imbalanced teen or an actual personality disorder. I'm against diagnosing anyone with a personality disorder when they're under the age of 17, and you should not diagnose yourself with one of you are under 17. Period.
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Posted 2/8/15 , edited 2/8/15

sunstormglacialmeteor wrote:

In my opinion its really really annoying when people self diagnose, Espiecelly with OCD it seems like APPARENTLY EVERY F-ING PERSON I MEET HAS OCD. If you have a slight inclination to fix something out of order that does not mean you have ocd



That's a thing with ADHD too. I admit that I have tendencies of it, I was almost diagnosed falsely as part of the later 90s to early 2000s misdiagnosis wave of ADHD/OCD/ADD kids, but my parents rejected the ideas psychs kept giving that I was ADD. Sure, I have problems with distractions, but it's not so bad that it affects my performance. Sure, I even have problems with compulsions, that doesn't mean I'm OCD.

problem is that many of the people who claim they have it that you know were likely inclusions or statistics in the misdiagnosis wave. They might've been diagnosed back then, but not actually fit the modern descriptors for the disorder. During the misdiagnosis wave at about 3 doctors almost said I was "severely autistic" too because of my limited speech. When i was just a kid who didn't like to talk.
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35 / M / The IshVille
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Posted 2/8/15 , edited 2/9/15
No, they definitely shouldn't. But, it's what people are going to do anyway. Hell, I did it. I was convinced I had like 4 different personality disorders. I saw a professional, and I actually only had one. Major Depressive Disorder. I think if a kid is looking things like that up, and really believes they have a problem, they should tell their parents and go see a doctor. Because while they might be off base self-diagnosing, they may not be far off base. Better safe than shotgunned.
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27 / M
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Posted 2/8/15
People who aren't qualified should not diagnose. It's as simple as that. It's fine to do research when you're curious but it's not okay to rely on that as heavily as you would a real expert's diagnosis.
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30 / M / In a world that d...
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Posted 2/8/15
A formal diagnosis allows one to obtain prescription medicines, hence, only medical professionals should make a formal diagnosis, since obtaining prescription stuff without said prescription is illegal and dangerous, especially when you're talking about stuff that affects your brain.

If you think something is wrong with you, you should see a qualified professional immediately. Armchair diagnosis from someone that isn't qualified to make that call can result in disaster and years lost to pointless struggle. I speak from experience in the light that I didn't diagnose myself with anything, but my dad forced the thought that I had depression onto psychiatrists he had me seeing after he told me he wanted to address ADHD in me. In reality, nothing was wrong with me at that point in time. Strangely enough, I was prescribed antidepressants, stuff I knew wasn't for ADHD, that actually made me depressed when I wasn't. Spent so many sleepless nights awake between freshman summer and mid sophomore year of high school.

So the important thing to note is, if YOU think something is wrong with you, see a pro. Don't let anyone unqualified, be it yourself or a family member, do it for you.
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Posted 2/8/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

People who aren't qualified should not diagnose. It's as simple as that. It's fine to do research when you're curious but it's not okay to rely on that as heavily as you would a real expert's diagnosis.


^This.
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Posted 2/9/15

Do you think people should "self diagnose" mental conditions… and then claim they have them?


No.
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23 / M / Bolton, England
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Posted 2/9/15 , edited 2/9/15
Er, no. You shouldn't claim you're things you're not. If you think you are but you're told you're not I suppose you could keep trying till you're told you're autistic or physo or whatever it is you wanna be...

Doing so is what causes 12 year olds to say they're depressed.
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Posted 2/9/15
I guess it depends. I know someone who self-diagnosed themselves with depression, but those symptoms are a little easier to fish out than other disorders. And more common. They went to get an actual diagnosis, though, just in case.

But otherwise, I don't trust it, personally. I fess up to self-diagnosing myself with ADD or ADHD, but I only know based on similar symptons I share with my mom who has ADHD. I should probably get a "sturdier" diagnosis.

People in a medical/psychological field are far more knowledgeable than those who aren't; they know what they're doing.
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40 / F / Washington, USA
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Posted 2/9/15 , edited 2/9/15
I don't think the real harm comes in the self-diagnosis, just that it is embarrassing and upsetting to people who really do have the disorder to see someone that they feel doesn't have a life like theirs or the struggles they have create drama and posture and maybe give the wrong impression to "normal people"

A lot of people can't afford medical care right now. I know people who are trying to go homeopathic and natural home remedies for everything simply because they can't afford to see a doctor for their physical health, let alone something that May or May Not have to do with their psyche. I have schizoaffective disorder. I've heard of someone with the same disorder losing their coverage and again, trying diet and natural home remedies, because they no longer have mental health coverage and they HAVE been diagnosed. I don't know how they are doing right now.

I've found a lot of help in researching what people do that have a different diagnosis than me. According to the professionals, I don't have an anxiety disorder, but I've worked on what I do have through Edmund Bourne's The Anxiety and Phobia Handbook, and when I was having so much trouble with emotions that seemed to be out of control (I was having really bad fights with my parents at the time) I found a book called: Eclipses: behind the borderline personality disorder (ok, that was suggested by a professional, but she said I didn't fit the diagnosis but that it might help) and I found different techniques like 'wise mind' and 'turtling' (which is pausing and withdrawing before your reaction to give you a moment to breathe and recollect yourself)..

And I don't know about anyone else, but at first they didn't want to give me my diagnosis, so when people asked, I told them as best as I knew, but I also happened to be WRONG. They thought there was no reason why I needed to know exactly what my diagnosis was; the stigma was so great. I went through 3 hospital stays and over a year of counseling all together before my therapist asked me to pin my med provider down and ask her what my diagnosis really was. My med provider was upset because she said my caseworker/therapist could have asked her/looked it up in her chart. I'm just saying.. that person that is out of their mind if they think they are Bipolar III.. might have had an experience like mine and been forced to watch the Bipolar III video four times in the hospital and then been checked out without discussing what the diagnosis actually is (true story.. 2nd hospitalization)
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Posted 2/9/15
What really bothers OP is when people use terms like these:

"Neurotypical" to describe all people without mental illness, when most people don't have mental illness. Like, 80 or more percent of the world isn't severely metally impaired and you're probably not yourself, so I cordially invite you to the party of "shut the hell up and quit whining about how the world doesn't comprehend things they're not familiar with, such as your self diagnosed 'mental illness', emphasis on the sarcastic air quotes".

"Neurodivergent" where they try and say that developmental and mental disorders should be placed under the same umbrella when they're not the same damn thing at all, and whoever in the fuckery thought that they shared enough similarities to be grouped together under this term, or the tumblrinas, are crackpots.

"Ableist" to describe everything that insults a person's intelligence and / or is just a rude word. If you show discrimination towards an actually disabled person, for example, if you refuse to let by people with a wheelchair or purposely block the way for disabled people, you're an ableist piece of crap who is impeding on their ease of access, and that is actual ableism. Saying "stupid" is not. Insulting a person's intelligence is not insulting some disability they have. It's just stating, you do not think their intelligence is anything above subpar and that, frankly, they're fucking dumb. If I tell a person they're an idiot it's not "abLEWSIT because they have autismzzz!!!" it's just me honestly thinking that they do not seem intelligent. I have a developmental disorder myself, and really, I can tolerate people using words incorrectly and rudely, namely "retard" at my school because I know they're ignorant to the context of the actual word. Retard is one of the few things I myself admittedly don't like saying because it actually could be perceived as ableist in many contexts.

Seriously, though. I have never heard these three terms spoken out loud, in real life. Which is why I personally think the former two are outdated garbage. Nuerodivergent sounds like it was coined back in the days when people were mercilessly agonized by tortures in asylums or some crap. Today, people recognize that developmental and mental disorders are on two completely different spectrums. From what I've gathered Tumblrinas seem to blindly follow the principle that they're under the same category, though. Sigh.
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Posted 2/9/15
Under normal circumstances, hearing what someone has to say wouldn't or rather shouldn't be a problem.
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Posted 2/9/15 , edited 2/9/15

Muur wrote:

Er, no. You shouldn't claim you're things you're not. If you think you are but you're told you're not I suppose you could keep trying till you're told you're autistic or physo or whatever it is you wanna be...

Doing so is what causes 12 year olds to say they're depressed.




12 year olds are literally hormonal nutcases. Given, however, I was diagnosed as depressed at an extremely young age with depression. Prepubescently, in fact; I was like 8-9 years old when they finally figured out what my problem was and prescribed medications; but I have both a genetic inclination to the condition and environmental factors that caused me to be depressed.

Not to say, however, that being 12 did not contribute to my worsening mood. It definitely did. That kind of hormonal imblanace can turn anyone, especially young girls, into massive vipers. Twelve year olds are pretty darned vicious and socially being 12 is one of the worst ages in an educational setting, the start of middle school and the formation of cliques and exclusionary little sects, having to try and find your middle school "niche" or forever face bullying and loserdom, etc. I hated middle school. Kids are snakes. Sometimes it seems like theyre worsening. And I thought a few years ago I was treated poorly? Yeah, right. Seeing stories about bullies nowadays makes my blood simmer even more than it used to when i myself used to try retaliation against my bullies.
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Posted 2/9/15

animegirl2222 wrote:
Seriously, though. I have never heard these three terms spoken out loud, in real life. Which is why I personally think the former two are outdated garbage.


Neurotypical is a word I have heard quite bit before; but always in a psychological setting. That is, jargon amount neuropsychologist because there's no good substitute for "people without neurological disorders."

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

I was hesitant to contribute to the discussion, but here I am, so I might as well. I am diagnoses with a neurological disorder (as in, formally diagnosed), and the only reason I had the diagnosis in the first place *was* because my parents happened to obtain an unexpected amount of money when I was about ten--seeing a doctor isn't free. As such, I have very ambivalent feelings when it comes to self-diagnosis. The ideal situation is that someone can get a formal diagnosis and any necessary therapy and such to address their issue. The reality is that not everyone has ready access to the right medical person to actually get a diagnosis.

There is, however, something I want to comment. Whether or not someone should claim their diagnosis for a bad behavior is--to me--an independent issue of whether or not they were self-diagnosed. We all of issues to be sure, some more than others, but using a diagnosis for bad behavior is nothing short of infuriating. If you're being asshole, own up to it--diagnosis or no diagnosis. Does self-diagnosis make it better or worse? It really depends on context. What were the person's options (i.e. could they seek professional help)? How did they disclose their self-identified status? What is the disorder in question? And so on. It doesn't strike me as a question with a straightforward answer, precisely because they're too many contingencies.
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