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What if mythical creatures turn out to be real and is hitting on you. What would you do ?
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Posted 2/6/15

KarenAraragi wrote:



Morbidhanson

If they are non-human, the law does not protect them as much as it does humans. Inter-species stuff is bestiality to me. Plants don't count since they aren't animals. I know it's still an awful thing to say. I'm not completely serious, BTW lol


I'd probably be punished with a fine or something if I did that.


Well to each their own. About the plant thing. you may want to reconsider that. Here what I mean.

Sea Anemones Are Half-Plant, Half-Animal, Gene Study Finds.
The sea anemone is an oddball: half-plant and half-animal, at least when it comes to its genetic code, new research suggests.

The sea creature's genes look more like those of animals, but the regulatory code that determines whether those genes are expressed resembles that in plants, according to a study published Tuesday (March 18) in the journal Genome Research.

What's more, the complicated network of gene interactions found in the simple sea anemone resembles that found in widely divergent, more complex animals.


"Since the sea anemone shows a complex landscape of gene regulatory elements similar to the fruit fly or other model animals, we believe that this principle of complex gene regulation was already present in the common ancestor of human, fly and sea anemone some 600 million years ago," Michaela Schwaiger, a researcher at the University of Vienna, said in a statement. [See Stunning Photos of Glowing Sea Creatures]

A simple plan

The size of an organism's genome doesn't correspond to how simple or complex that creature's body is, so some scientists hypothesized that more complicated links and networks between genes made for more sophisticated body plans.

Schwaiger and her colleagues at the University of Vienna analyzed the genome of the sea anemone, not only identifying genes that code for proteins, but also assessing snippets of code known as promoters and enhancers, which help turn the volume up or down on gene expression.

The team found the sea anemone's simple anatomy hides a complicated network of gene interactions, similar to those found in higher animals such as fruit flies and humans. That belies the notion that more complex gene networks always correlate with more elaborate body plans, and also suggests the evolution of this level of gene regulation happened before sea anemones, fruit flies and humans diverged, about 600 million years ago.

Part plant

The team also found the sea anemone had a second level of regulation that closely resembles one found in plants. Genes are transcribed or copied by a RNA, which is then used as a recipe to build proteins. But tiny snippets of genetic material called microRNAs, which bind to the RNA copies, can stop the step of protein assembly.

While plants and animals have microRNAs, they look and act very different, so researchers had assumed they arose independently in the two kingdoms. Schwaiger and her colleagues found the microRNAs in the sea anemone have similarities to those found in both plants and animals.

That suggests these microRNAs probably evolved before plants and animals diverged long ago, and provides an evolutionary link between plant and animal microRNA.

Here the link. http://www.livescience.com/44243-sea-anemone-genome-analyzed.html

Here another one. http://news.discovery.com/animals/sea-slug-uses-gene-from-algae-to-live-like-a-plant-150204.htm?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=DNewsSocial

A gene that comes from the algae it eats has been found on the chromosome of a green sea slug, a discovery that paints a clearer picture for researchers of how the slug is able to live like a plant for long periods and get nourishment it needs from the sun.

In a new study, a team The Marine Biological Laboratory used advanced imaging to spot a gene from the alga Vaucheria litorea on the chromosome of Elysia chlorotica, the emerald sea slug. The gene is key to helping the slug sustain the photosynthetic processes that feed it. The gene isn't the only instance of E. chlorotica borrowing from V. litorea.

Indeed, it's long been known that the slug heists chloroplasts -- specialized parts of cells that drive photosynthesis -- from V. litorea and then stashes them in its own digestive cells.

The purloined chloroplasts keep on keeping on with the photosynthesis in their new home in the slug -- nourishing the creature for up to nine months.

It's that nine months that has more recently puzzled scientists. The time frame is a lot longer than the chloroplasts would function in the algae from which they came. How does the slug get them to last longer than they otherwise might?

That's where the newly discovered gene comes in. The type of algal gene found in the slug is central to sustaining photosynthesis -- it makes a key enzyme that repairs damaged chloroplasts and keeps them working.

It's a useful bit of theft that gets passed on to slugs down the line. "The gene is incorporated into the slug chromosome and transmitted to the next generation of slugs," said study co-author Sidney K. Pierce, an emeritus professor at University of South Florida and at University of Maryland, College Park, in a press release.

The next-gen slugs still have to pilfer chloroplasts from V. litorea, Pierce noted, but the genes to maintain them are already on the animal's genome. "There is no way on Earth that genes from an alga should work inside an animal cell," said Pierce. "And yet here, they do. They allow the animal to rely on sunshine for its nutrition. So if something happens to their food source, they have a way of not starving to death until they find more algae to eat."

The team notes that its finding represents one of the only known examples of gene transfer between multicellular species, and that it could be relevant to human gene therapy research that targets genetic diseases.

"Figuring out the mechanism of this naturally occurring gene transfer could be extremely instructive for future medical applications," Pierce said.

The team's work has recently been published in The Biological Bulletin.


Interesting. I'd be very confused if I got hit on by an attractive sentient humanoid plant/animal hybrid
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It doesn't matter.
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Posted 2/6/15
I doubt I would have much choice.
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19
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Posted 2/6/15
I'd be very uncomfortable tbh
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Posted 2/6/15
is the monster i question a monster girl?
Is said monster girl from the monmusou universe?

if so, id get the red bull.
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Posted 2/6/15
Monster Musume is so awesome! I am honestly smitten for a few of the characters hahh (love the Harpy, Papi, the most!)

But, in reality standards, they probably wouldn't be too nice as personality like in the mangas/comics... I mean, I'd just be happy a woman was hitting on me! xD
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Posted 2/6/15
Can you be more specific? Because my only reply would be "it depends" right now.
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31 / M / Minnesota, USA
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Posted 2/6/15
Give me Holo and I would a very happy man
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23 / M / California
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Posted 2/6/15
Ride a motherfucking dragon!
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21 / M / Tiphares
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Posted 2/6/15 , edited 2/6/15
I remember this doujin I read once where the hero was having sex with a half fly half woman monster girl and she laid her eggs in his anus whenever he made her orgasm (like, shat them out). Maybe it was his stomach. I forget.

Anyway.

Now, the question is, do female flies actually do that to their partners?

Also, would anyone tap a fly-girl?
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M / Houston, Tx
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Posted 2/6/15
Idk, I definitely wouldn't call them "Monsters".

That's basically "Fat" in normal girl version.
Posted 2/6/15

Shrapnel893 wrote:

I remember this doujin I read once where the hero was having sex with a half fly half woman monster girl and she laid her eggs in his anus whenever he made her orgasm (like, shat them out). Maybe it was his stomach. I forget.

Anyway.

Now, the question is, do female flies actually do that to their partners?

Also, would anyone tap a fly-girl?


I know going to regret this but give me the link ? Is your fault for making me curious.
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21 / M / Tiphares
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Posted 2/7/15

KarenAraragi wrote:

I know going to regret this but give me the link ? Is your fault for making me curious.


Sure, just let me find it again.

Might take a bit.
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F
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Posted 2/7/15
Nah. I would not go for a mythical creature. If I were a dude, I would probably go for a catgirl.
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M / Baka Zone
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Posted 2/7/15
I would definitely want a unicorn to hit on me.

Dat horn.
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22 / F / Kingdom Hearts
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Posted 2/7/15
it depends is the creature a guy and is he hot?
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