First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply Best way to learn japanese?
48616 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M
Online
Posted 2/11/15
I'm currently looking into purchasing software or a program for learning japanese. I've heard the Rosetta Stone version for japanese is horrible, and the Pimsleur method is great. Any ideas from the crunchyroll family? It's my intent to play VN's in their native language one day...
116 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Attending to you
Offline
Posted 2/11/15
what if you tried to get a Japanese lover?
One Punch Mod
85792 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Boston-ish
Offline
Posted 2/11/15 , edited 2/11/15

VAHitokiri wrote:

I'm currently looking into purchasing software or a program for learning japanese. I've heard the Rosetta Stone version for japanese is horrible, and the Pimsleur method is great. Any ideas from the crunchyroll family? It's my intent to play VN's in their native language one day...


I don't have any particular advice, but did want to let you know I've moved this over to our Advice, Info, Recommendations forum.

Also, I know there's a Crunchyroll Group dedicated to Japanese language learning, so you might want to check that out. Here's a link to the thread where the creator announced it and describes it a bit:

/forumtopic-880415/do-you-love-the-japanese-language-are-you-passionate-about-learning-if-so-please-join-my-club
48616 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M
Online
Posted 2/11/15

-Genuine wrote:

what if you tried to get a Japanese lover?


I have an irish-american waifu, so i'm good bruh.

I have heard that's one of the best methods though.
116 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Attending to you
Offline
Posted 2/11/15
Irish-American? that is very brave of you sir. Well the Irish part anyways
18602 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 2/11/15
Move to japan
20192 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / The Heroes Associ...
Offline
Posted 2/11/15
private tutor. You can learn hiragana, kanji (Except you might have trouble with the stroke order) and katakana by yourself; however, you will most definitely want to have a private tutor to help you learn conversation and how to speak properly.

You will also want to learn the culture, (anime is the worst representation of japanese culture ever, so disregard anything you have seen in anime as your basis for japanese culture)


Japanese is very hard, I gave up after studying it for two years because I was studying for 4 hours a day just to remember the stuff I learned previously.

not to discourage you but unless you plan on moving to japan, and living, or working in a translation job, its a waste of time.

You will never truly master japanese unless you are completely immersed in it.
48616 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M
Online
Posted 2/11/15

AzazelOfNexium wrote:

private tutor. You can learn hiragana, kanji (Except you might have trouble with the stroke order) and katakana by yourself; however, you will most definitely want to have a private tutor to help you learn conversation and how to speak properly.

You will also want to learn the culture, (anime is the worst representation of japanese culture ever, so disregard anything you have seen in anime as your basis for japanese culture)


Japanese is very hard, I gave up after studying it for two years because I was studying for 4 hours a day just to remember the stuff I learned previously.

not to discourage you but unless you plan on moving to japan, and living, or working in a translation job, its a waste of time.

You will never truly master japanese unless you are completely immersed in it.


Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.
Posted 2/11/15

VAHitokiri wrote:

I'm currently looking into purchasing software or a program for learning japanese. I've heard the Rosetta Stone version for japanese is horrible, and the Pimsleur method is great. Any ideas from the crunchyroll family? It's my intent to play VN's in their native language one day...



Like everybody say you should get a tutor. But if you happen to be able to afford a homestay program, you should take it. Even if you learn the language there no guaranty you will fully remember it if you don't use it a lot. Practice is one thing but using it is something else.
Posted 3/4/15

VAHitokiri wrote:

I'm currently looking into purchasing software or a program for learning japanese. I've heard the Rosetta Stone version for japanese is horrible, and the Pimsleur method is great. Any ideas from the crunchyroll family? It's my intent to play VN's in their native language one day...


Don't bother with rosetta stone it's really bad for learning Japanese. Best bet is to take a course in it. Eventually going to Japan itself and spending enough time there you naturally pick up the language as it's spoken over there.
10587 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Rabbit Horse
Offline
Posted 3/4/15 , edited 3/4/15
the most important thing is immersion, as already pointed out, but you'll also need to learn the grammar and vocabulary to be able to enjoy playing an untranslated VN. I think there was a Japanese club here. Engaging in simple conversations in Japanese may be a good way to progress in your learning (and having fun at the same time ^^). For grammar, Tae Kim's guide is arguably the best free tool, but i heard the book series Genki does a good job at explaining the grammar, too. Also, don't expect to learn the language overnight - it will take time (more or less depending on your immersion).
Posted 3/4/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

the most important thing is immersion, as already pointed out, but you'll also need to learn the grammar and vocabulary to be able to enjoy playing an untranslated VN. I think there was a Japanese club here. Engaging in simple conversations in Japanese may be a good way to progress in your learning (and having fun at the same time ^^). For grammar, Tae Kim's guide is arguably the best free tool, but i heard the book series Genki does a good job at explaining the grammar, too. Also, don't expect to learn the language overnight - it will take time (more or less depending on your immersion).


Yep i have the app on my phone haven't gotten through it all the way but from what I've read of it its quite good. Ill have to look into the Genki books.
79737 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
49 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 3/5/15

namealreadytaken wrote:

the most important thing is immersion, as already pointed out, but you'll also need to learn the grammar and vocabulary to be able to enjoy playing an untranslated VN. I think there was a Japanese club here. Engaging in simple conversations in Japanese may be a good way to progress in your learning (and having fun at the same time ^^). For grammar, Tae Kim's guide is arguably the best free tool, but i heard the book series Genki does a good job at explaining the grammar, too. Also, don't expect to learn the language overnight - it will take time (more or less depending on your immersion).


^This

I think the club being referenced is Japanese Language Club. Tae Kim's guide is very good, and I've also used Genki's books. I'll also recommend the JPod101 podcast series.
72836 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Central KY.
Offline
Posted 3/5/15
Why, through the Gift of Anime of course!

Well...SOMEWHAT.
11696 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 3/5/15

AzazelOfNexium wrote:
You will also want to learn the culture, (anime is the worst representation of japanese culture ever, so disregard anything you have seen in anime as your basis for japanese culture)


I'd have to disagree with this. Anime is a great way to pick up on Japanese culture, as long as you take what you are watching with a pinch of salt.

For example, Urusei Yatsura is a comedy that frequently parodies aspects of Japanese culture. There are references to folklore, such as karasu tengu, kappa, oni and kami; references to history, with at least one story set in Heian-kyo; and episodes teaching Lum and her friends about modern Japanese culture (such as the Shichi-Go-San festival). All these references and stories are of course twisted in a way that the native Japanese audience will find amusing, but they are a great way to introduce yourself to aspects of Japanese culture that you can then read about online to get a more accurate interpretation.

Also, there are a lot of casual cultural references in Anime that you can trust simply because they are treated as background to the plot. Saying ittadakimasu before eating; washing yourself before getting into a bath; visiting a shinto shrine at new year; staying mostly in the same classroom at school while the teachers walk to their next class; school being held on Saturday mornings but not afternoons; festivals; cram schools; cherry blossom viewing; types of food people commonly eat.

I could continue for hours listing all the interesting things about the Japanese culture I have picked up from Anime over the years. All it takes is patience and an ability to consider the information you receive in a critical light - is it a true cultural statement or a plot device for the current anime?
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.