First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Best way to learn japanese?
Posted 3/5/15

MidoriNoTora wrote:


AzazelOfNexium wrote:
You will also want to learn the culture, (anime is the worst representation of japanese culture ever, so disregard anything you have seen in anime as your basis for japanese culture)


I'd have to disagree with this. Anime is a great way to pick up on Japanese culture, as long as you take what you are watching with a pinch of salt.

For example, Urusei Yatsura is a comedy that frequently parodies aspects of Japanese culture. There are references to folklore, such as karasu tengu, kappa, oni and kami; references to history, with at least one story set in Heian-kyo; and episodes teaching Lum and her friends about modern Japanese culture (such as the Shichi-Go-San festival). All these references and stories are of course twisted in a way that the native Japanese audience will find amusing, but they are a great way to introduce yourself to aspects of Japanese culture that you can then read about online to get a more accurate interpretation.

Also, there are a lot of casual cultural references in Anime that you can trust simply because they are treated as background to the plot. Saying ittadakimasu before eating; washing yourself before getting into a bath; visiting a shinto shrine at new year; staying mostly in the same classroom at school while the teachers walk to their next class; school being held on Saturday mornings but not afternoons; festivals; cram schools; cherry blossom viewing; types of food people commonly eat.

I could continue for hours listing all the interesting things about the Japanese culture I have picked up from Anime over the years. All it takes is patience and an ability to consider the information you receive in a critical light - is it a true cultural statement or a plot device for the current anime?


You can learn a lot about Japanese culture through anime. Trying to learn the language while an ok idea for some key phrases and stuff isn't recommended. One of the biggest issues with trying to learn the language seriously through anime is that the translations and the actual words don't always match up. They tend to shorten or use a slang version of a word quite often from what I've noticed.

Japanese culture is just so many different things rolled into one its hard to get a grasp on whats right and whats wrong for someone not of that culture. Mainly why i want to visit or even maybe eventually move there if i ever have the chance. The culture is just so rich and vast compared to American culture which i never could stand.

All in all the best way to learn anything is a combination of things like books, websites, and of course actually visiting.
13193 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
☆Land of sweets☆
Offline
Posted 3/5/15
Using anime to learn the language is generally a terrible idea, especially because the translations are sometimes inaccurate or dead wrong. Here's one of many examples:

original, with a Japanese transcript


translation by a fangroup


notes

as you can see, the differences are very noticeable. there are plenty of other examples where the translation and the actual wording do not match. you can still use anime for some cultural background (with a pinch of salt), and possibly to train your listening skill
(though there are better sources out there other than anime in this regard)
15740 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 3/5/15

KyotoTofu wrote:

You can learn a lot about Japanese culture through anime. Trying to learn the language while an ok idea for some key phrases and stuff isn't recommended. One of the biggest issues with trying to learn the language seriously through anime is that the translations and the actual words don't always match up. They tend to shorten or use a slang version of a word quite often from what I've noticed.

Japanese culture is just so many different things rolled into one its hard to get a grasp on whats right and whats wrong for someone not of that culture. Mainly why i want to visit or even maybe eventually move there if i ever have the chance. The culture is just so rich and vast compared to American culture which i never could stand.

All in all the best way to learn anything is a combination of things like books, websites, and of course actually visiting.


Yep, trying to learn the language solely from anime would be a bad idea, as would trying to learn the language through watching subtitled films. It's a great proxy for immersion though if you have limited access to native speakers. When I'm learning a new word it helps my memory if I can link it to the sound of someone saying it. "Chodai" for example is always accompanied in my mind with the voice of Tendo Nabiki from Ranma 1/2 (Takayama Minami) and "Kaero" has the voice of Momiji from Blue Seed (Hayashibara Megumi).

Poor subtitling is a major bugbear of mine. I have done some sporadic translations as a hobby from time to time, so I am well aware of the issues around literal and practical translations so I am fairly tolerant of those. However quite a few anime subtitlers over the years have taken the lazy route of assuming that the script from the English dub is adequate for use as subtitles - that often leads to them subtitling dramatic pauses where the dubbers inserted extra dialogue. That wrecked several anime for me including Noein, Appleseed and Tokko.

In answer to the original poster's desire to play VNs in the native language, one useful step on the journey would be to buy some second hand Manga from eBay or similar site and have a go at translating them. Of course that would only be a good idea after learning the basics of the language and the kana (hiragana & katakana). My knowledge of the kanji has improved greatly since I forced myself to start reading them regularly.
Sailor Candy Moderator
215704 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29
Offline
Posted 1/21/17
Forum Clean up. Old 2015 threads Locked.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.