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Introverts and Extroverts Have Different Brains.
Posted 2/13/15

So the video on the link explain it. http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-397-introverts-and-extroverts-have-differe?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=DNews&utm_campaign=DNewsSocial

Here some articles link that where on the video link.

Are Extroverts Happier than Introverts?
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/thrive/201205/are-extroverts-happier-introverts
"Insight into differences between two personality types."

Are Extroverts Happier Than Introverts?
Insight into differences between two personality types Post published by Dan Buettner on May 14, 2012 in Thrive


Do You Have Good Character?

What really makes people who they are? Personality is defined as “the combination of characteristics or qualities that form an individual’s unique character.” It is often misunderstood. Businessmen and teachers have been trying to figure out how to use the personality of their workers and students to maximize productivity since the early 1970s, when the idea was first made popular by psychologist Dr. Carl Jung. Personality can’t be seen or touched and yet significantly affects how people feel and experience their lives. It is highly correlated to learning and productivity. But does it relate to well-being and happiness?

Extrovert vs Introvert

Two major personality types are extroverts and introverts. These types are known to have unique ways of feeling re-energized and motivated. They each have characteristic ways of interacting with the world and processing information.

Researchers estimate extroverts make up 50 - 74 percent of the population. These “social butterflies” thrive under social stimulation. Extroverts focus on their external environment, the people and activities around them. Extroverts thrive in active, fast-paced jobs, such as politics, teaching and sales, where quick decisions are commonplace. Extroverts learn by doing and enjoy talking through ideas and problems. Multi-tasking comes easily to them. Two examples of famous extroverts are Oprah and current U.S. President, Barack Obama.

The other 16 - 50 percent of the population consists of introverts, who get their energy from having “alone time.” Careers promoting introvert’s strength include scientists, writers and artists, although television personalities David Lettermen and Barbara Walters are self-proclaimed introverts. Introverts enjoy spending time alone or in small groups of people, but may get overwhelmed in new situations or in large groups of people. They prefer to focus on one task at a time and observe a situation before jumping in.

As it turns out, the brains of introverts and extroverts are wired differently! The front part of introvert’s brains are most active and stimulated by solitary activities while the back part of extrovert’s brains are most active. This part of the brain is stimulated by sensory events coming in from the external world! In addition, a chemical called “dopamine” is released by our brains whenever we experience something positive. It’s an automatic reward center and makes us feel good! Extroverts need more dopamine to feel an effect, whereas introverts have a low dopamine threshold. They don’t require a lot of stimulation to feel rewarded.


Which Type is Most Successful?

Issues may arise when an introvert and extrovert interact. An introvert may view an extrovert as bossy and overbearing whereas an extrovert may view an introvert as stuck up or shy. In fact, shyness is a trait commonly used to describe introvert, but both personality types can be shy. Shyness is a feeling of uneasiness or anxiety experienced in social situations. Unlike introverts, who prefer less social stimulation, shy people often crave social interaction, but avoid it for fear of criticism or rejection.

So which personality type has the real advantage, the extrovert or the introvert? Experience shows teamed up, the extrovert and the introvert, are a powerful team. Steve Jobs, a charismatic extrovert, teamed up with introvert Steve Wozniak to co-found Apple Inc.

Are Extroverts Happier Than Introverts?

There’s no clear answer to this question. Current tests consistently rate extroverts higher on the happiness scale than introverts. However, many of these tests measure degree of happiness using activities like socializing and interacting with the outside world, both of which extroverts need to thrive! Introverts do experience happiness when they around other people, but are most happy when participating in lower-key activities. These are not accounted for on current tests and likely causes introverts to score lower.

There also appears to be a cultural factor affecting the happiness level of extroverts and introverts. Many Western cultures tend to favor extroverted personalities, people who act quickly, appear friendly and are outgoing. Introverts often feel pressure to be extroverts, which can lead to anxiety or lowered self-esteem. A majority of Eastern cultures tend to encourage people who are more contemplative, quiet and appear serene. Introverts in these cultures don’t feel the stigma to be extroverted and so are more accepting of their inherent personality. Research supports the keys to happiness lie in having a sense of purpose, self acceptance and a supportive social network, which both personality types can form.



The Great Introverts and Extroverts of Our Time."Herewith, TIME's unscientific survey of loud (and quiet) giants - it takes both kinds to make history." The Iron Lady was no shrinking violet. Thatcher’s extroverted personality helped her bull her way through British sexism to become the country’s first female Prime Minister.Margaret Thatcher, Prime Minister http://healthland.time.com/2012/01/27/the-great-introverts-and-extroverts-of-our-time/slide/margaret-thatcher-prime-minister/




Experts: Introverted youth have deep roots for behavior. "The attitude that there's something wrong with introverted people is widely shared in society, where fast talk and snap decisions are often valued over listening, deliberation and careful planning." http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-11-27-introvert-children_x.htm

Experts: Introverted youth have deep roots for behavior
By Janie Magruder, Gannett News Service
The attitude that there's something wrong with introverted people is widely shared in society, where fast talk and snap decisions are often valued over listening, deliberation and careful planning. Extroverts seem to rule the world or, at least, the USA, which hasn't elected an introverted president for three decades, since Jimmy Carter.
"The signals we get from the world agree that extroversion is valued," says Sanford Cohn, an associate professor in curriculum and instruction at Arizona State University. "A lot of the messages we get from society have to do with being social, and in order to be social you have to behave a certain way."

But that is impossible for introverted kids. Raising them isn't easy, particularly if parents, family members, teachers, coaches and other adults don't allow them to be who they are.

Introverted children enjoy the internal world of thoughts, feelings and fantasies, and there's a physiological reason for this. Researchers using brain scans have found introverts have more brain activity in general, and specifically in the frontal lobes. When these areas are activated, introverts are energized by retrieving long-term memories, problem solving, introspection, complex thinking and planning.

Extroverts enjoy the external world of things, people and activities. They have more activity in brain areas involved in processing the sensory information we're bombarded with daily. Because extroverts have less internally generated brain activity, they search for more external stimuli to energize them.

"It's the different pathways that are turned on that activate the behaviors and abilities we see in introverts and extroverts," says Marti Olsen Laney, a neuroscience researcher and author in Portland, Ore., who is credited with connecting introversion with its underlying biology. "It impacts all areas of their lives: how they process information, how they restore their energy, what they enjoy and how they communicate."

Introverted children need time alone more than do extroverted children, says Laney, whose book, The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child, is due in January. "Extroverts gain energy by being out and about," but "being with people takes energy from introverts, and they need to get away to restore that energy."

Laney says introverted kids also behave differently.

They're not slow, inattentive or shy. Shyness is behavior that may diminish as children grow; introversion is a character trait that lasts.




http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/extraversion-or-introversion.htm
Extraversion or Introversion.
"The first pair of psychological preferences is Extraversion and Introversion. Where do you put your attention and get your energy?"

The first pair of psychological preferences is Extraversion and Introversion. Where do you put your attention and get your energy? Do you like to spend time in the outer world of people and things (Extraversion), or in your inner world of ideas and images (Introversion)?

Extraversion and Introversion as terms used by C. G. Jung explain different attitudes people use to direct their energy. These words have a meaning in psychology that is different from the way they are used in everyday language.

Everyone spends some time extraverting and some time introverting. Don't confuse Introversion with shyness or reclusiveness. They are not related.

Take a minute to ask yourself which of the following descriptions seems more natural, effortless, and comfortable for you?
Extraversion (E)
I like getting my energy from active involvement in events and having a lot of different activities. I'm excited when I'm around people and I like to energize other people. I like moving into action and making things happen. I generally feel at home in the world. I often understand a problem better when I can talk out loud about it and hear what others have to say.

The following statements generally apply to me:
I am seen as "outgoing" or as a "people person."
I feel comfortable in groups and like working in them.
I have a wide range of friends and know lots of people.
I sometimes jump too quickly into an activity and don't allow enough time to think it over.
Before I start a project, I sometimes forget to stop and get clear on what I want to do and why.
Introversion (I)
I like getting my energy from dealing with the ideas, pictures, memories, and reactions that are inside my head, in my inner world. I often prefer doing things alone or with one or two people I feel comfortable with. I take time to reflect so that I have a clear idea of what I'll be doing when I decide to act. Ideas are almost solid things for me. Sometimes I like the idea of something better than the real thing.

The following statements generally apply to me:
I am seen as "reflective" or "reserved."
I feel comfortable being alone and like things I can do on my own.
I prefer to know just a few people well.
I sometimes spend too much time reflecting and don't move into action quickly enough.
I sometimes forget to check with the outside world to see if my ideas really fit the experience.








My question is what are you a Introverts or Extroverts ? Do you agree with anything being say here ? I fall into the Introverts area.
Posted 2/13/15 , edited 2/13/15
"A majority of Eastern cultures tend to encourage people who are more contemplative, quiet and appear serene"

This is too generalising, and quite untrue... it's like saying Asians like maths. I don't think there are any cultures that like quiet, contemplative people... sorry. That is the honest truth.

Asians tend to favour people who don't speak out of turn etc, but they don't really favour absolute silence (which is a trait of introversion), nobody does (except introverts).

_______

And having said that, only the middle class or higher ups actually care about "respecting elders", meaning not talking back to elders, and using "respectful language" (like the honorifics in Japanese)... poor people and lower class Asians don't actually care about... respectful languages.

It's like in Western culture, only the rich people use posh language, average people like us don't care, we'll butcher the language any way we want #yolo.
Posted 2/13/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:

"A majority of Eastern cultures tend to encourage people who are more contemplative, quiet and appear serene"

This is too generalising, and quite untrue... it's like saying Asians like maths. I don't think there are any cultures that like quiet, contemplative people... sorry. That is the honest truth.

Asians tend to favour people who don't speak out of turn etc, but they don't really favour absolute silence (which is a trait of introversion), nobody does (except introverts).

_______

And having said that, only the middle class or higher ups actually care about "respecting elders", meaning not talking back to elders, and using "respectful language" (like the honorifics in Japanese)... poor people and lower class Asians don't actually care about... respectful languages.

It's like in Western culture, only the rich people use posh language, average people like us don't care, we'll butcher the language any way we want #yolo.


It seems if you are a child in some Eastern culture, you are to be seen and not heard, while adults are obnoxiously loud.
Posted 2/13/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:

"A majority of Eastern cultures tend to encourage people who are more contemplative, quiet and appear serene"

This is too generalising, and quite untrue... it's like saying Asians like maths. I don't think there are any cultures that like quiet, contemplative people... sorry. That is the honest truth.

Asians tend to favour people who don't speak out of turn etc, but they don't really favour absolute silence (which is a trait of introversion), nobody does (except introverts).

_______

And having said that, only the middle class or higher ups actually care about "respecting elders", meaning not talking back to elders, and using "respectful language" (like the honorifics in Japanese)... poor people and lower class Asians don't actually care about... respectful languages.

It's like in Western culture, only the rich people use posh language, average people like us don't care, we'll butcher the language any way we want #yolo.



I going to disagree with you here. I may fall in the Introverts area but I don't had absolute silence. If I disagree with somebody I make it know. I can be aloud or quiet depending of my mood. But that absolute silence thing is noting but a stereotype.
Posted 2/13/15

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

It seems if you are a child in some Eastern culture, you are to be seen and not heard, while adults are obnoxiously loud.


Exactly, or if you are a junior to a senior co-worker or boss, you have to stay quiet and not speak up. That's how Asians are raised to be... and again I'm talking about middle class and up, lower class Asians don't care about cultural rules and norms.


But amongst your peers, nobody likes a quiet person :-/ I'm assuming that's what the article is referring to, which is totally untrue. No matter what culture, what gender, most people like bubbly, talkative happy people... not boring shy quiet people.


(FYI, I'm an introvert, that's why I'm being objective).
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Posted 2/13/15
I think the basis for most extroverts enjoyment of social interactions is the affirmation of others. That desire for other's approval drives them to it. If you don't care about that, and/or social situations drain your mental energy, you are Introverted. Don't need to be any more complex then that.
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Posted 2/13/15
Well many that I've met in the Caribbean like children to be seen and not heard but when they're grown they expect the opposite. I'm mostly introvert. I say mostly because there are times and situations when I become an extrovert.
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Posted 2/13/15
Well, these damn "introverts" sure talk my ears off about Star Trek, anime, painting, you name it.

Funny how the people I like think I'm an extravert but the people I don't like think I'm an introvert. Could it be that the theory is simply bogus?

It's really far better explained by our information analysis strategy. A cold-blooded thinker has all the same traits as the made up "introvert" except that he/she also thrives in social situations that involve a very thoughtful approach with a clear goal, like teaching or flirting. A hot-blooded feeler/doer, meanwhile, has the traits of the made up "extrovert" but can also thrive in a solo setting, such as practicing a musical instrument or working on their house or car. They're pretty good at assembling stuff without reading the directions, too.

People just latched onto the introvert/extrovert theory because of how simple it was, despite it not really explaining things accurately. In my opinion, anyway.
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Posted 2/13/15
What about extrovert that later become introverts in life? Do they get a new brain???
Posted 2/13/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

It seems if you are a child in some Eastern culture, you are to be seen and not heard, while adults are obnoxiously loud.


Exactly, or if you are a junior to a senior co-worker or boss, you have to stay quiet and not speak up. That's how Asians are raised to be... and again I'm talking about middle class and up, lower class Asians don't care about cultural rules and norms.


But amongst your peers, nobody likes a quiet person :-/ I'm assuming that's what the article is referring to, which is totally untrue. No matter what culture, what gender, most people like bubbly, talkative happy people... not boring shy quiet people.


(FYI, I'm an introvert, that's why I'm being objective).


I didn't know that fact about asians, good to kn. As for the bold part, I completely agree!

As a introvert in the USA, I have noticed that we are not widely accepted. I've had bosses telling me that they don't like my quiet personality, that I must speak up and all that jazz....last year I got a part time job at a restaurant full of cubans, and puerto ricans (they are LOUD people) I had to quit 3 months later because I was tired of coworkers asking everyday "why are you so quiet?", one Chinese girl even told me that I was in my head a lot and that wasn't good. It's like everybody (except my close friends and family) wants me to change, it is wrong to be quiet but my friends know that I can be funny, talkative, and stand up for myself because they didn't care about I was quiet and wanted to know me more (I'm very reserved with strangers but as soon as I feel comfortable with someone, I like to joke around and be more open). Right now I work at a office all for myself with no one around, and I couldn't be happier.

Having said that, my best friends are and have always been extroverts!! I don't know why but I get along better with extroverts than with another introvert like myself. My friends are loud(I'm very quiet), make me laugh a lot(I'm not good at initiating jokes), they're quick in thinking(I must have some time), they enjoy large parties (I don't) and yet, we got along so well and they often say that they like my personality. This is why I love extroverts and I wish I was one.
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Posted 2/13/15
Definitely an Introvert here. There's a reason most of my socializing comes from the online world. I also very much value my quiet alone time. The problem is I'm married to an extrovert and am surrounded by them. They don't understand my love of silence and alone time and therefore drive me insane with their constant "lets go out and do stuff" requests.
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Posted 2/13/15 , edited 2/13/15

jdmill3r wrote:

I think the basis for most extroverts enjoyment of social interactions is the affirmation of others. That desire for other's approval drives them to it. If you don't care about that, and/or social situations drain your mental energy, you are Introverted. Don't need to be any more complex then that.


Not exactly (in regards to your former statement), extraversion and introversion comes from your genetic material assuming you have a well-adjusted development. It's not as simple as you think because many outside factors come into play like, again, genetics, maturation of the three developmental realms, the environment in which you grew up, etc.
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Posted 2/13/15 , edited 2/13/15
I'm most definitely an introvert. I've been identified as such for as long as I can remember. And it does get annoying when everyone asks the "Why so quiet?" question and when your parents are like "What did I do wrong? I exposed you to so many people and you still turn out like this?"

The thing is though, I feel in my element when I'm meeting people for the first time (in a casual setting of course). And I do find reward from hanging out with people and being in a good party. I can be the most talkative person in the room, though that rarely happens. And, it doesn't really matter whether the people I hang out with are extroverts or introvert, I just have to like hanging out with them for me to enjoy their company. So this whole introversion/extroversion thing is more like a sliding scale with me falling heavily in the introvert end but not quite at the extreme end.
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Posted 2/13/15
I think in the past 4-5 years its been fashionable to consider yourself an "introvert".

I think the cultural descriptions have changed, like that of the "geek" or "nerd" and it's just more positive these days so people tend to describe them as such.

I wear the fuck OUT when I talk to people. I used to have a job in sales, and after talking with people for 7 hours, I would end up having to take a half an hour to an hour long break with a nice long walk and just decompress from talking to people. I dread publicly having to speak, I tend towards hanging out by the walls at parties, I don't go out of my way to engage people in discussion, and, I HIGHLY prize my quiet alone time.

Oddly enough, social media and my phone I even have a revulsion towards due to the highly social aspect to it.

It also expands beyond that. I may even have some weird hypervigilance thing. I cannot tolerate busy or messy surroundings. Even if I'm not purposefully looking at it, it creates mental noise. People who walk by, or motion in the distance distracts me easily. The more I needed to be socially present, the more my mind kinda went into overdrive.

As such, yes, I am an introverted person. This is not to say I don't have social skills (I'm really actually quite able to be conversational). I just don't have the mental endurance for it.
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Posted 2/13/15
Attributing so many things simply to introversion or extroversion is setting oneself up for mistakes. While it's certainly an important aspect of a person's personality, it's definitely not the most important. I feel like people are latching onto it as an easy-to-see classification system, much like the construct of "gender" is founded on easily visible characteristics. While a lot of the information here seems plausible, some of it seems far too generalized, and I would be willing to bet is missing the mark.

I personally subscribe to the Jungian typology model, which is not so quick to generalize, and recognizes a much wider range in cognition and behaviour among different people. It may not have a significant body of physical research to support it, but it accounts for more diverse cognitive factors, and can comfortably account for everyone, as far as I've seen.

(Of course, as an INTP, my primary function is introverted thinking, which makes me more likely to accept something like this, which lacks proof but seems deductively true.)

I'm willing to believe (broadly) some of the information presented here. However, I feel that introversion and extroversion are often misrepresented among even enthusiasts. The popular definition involves energy: extroverts accumulate energy by interacting with others, while introverts expend it, and vice-versa for alone time. I think that this is generally true, but is descriptive of behaviour rather than addressing the underlying reason, which I believe to be related to outward or inward-focused living.

On the Jungian model, I'd say that a person's P or J preference is just as or more important than their E or I preference. EJs are often seen as the most charismatic and driven, because they have as their primary function an extroverted judging function (thinking or feeling). This means that it's natural for them to try and affect their environment. On the other end of the spectrum are the IPs, whose main function is an introverted judging function (P or J preference refers to which function someone extroverts, not which they actually favour; introverts are better understood by their "hidden" primary function.) IPs, too, are primary judgers, but this judging is aimed inward, towards ideas or values, and generally less concerned with their immediate application. In this way, IPs are invested in "figuring things out". They do not necessarily act on their opinions, but hate having them infringed upon by outside forces, and will often attempt to communicate their insights to others in the hopes that they will synthesize them and act upon them. It does not come naturally to the IP to act immediately. First, they must make sure they're acting in a way that they themselves recognize as worth it.

In the middle of this spectrum lie the EPs and IJs, for whom a perceiving function (sensation or intuition) is primary. Much like EJs and IPs, this is directed in a different manner for each type. EPs are interested in experience. They drink in the events that unfold around them in order to excite themselves and others, and consider their judgments secondary to this passive, enthusiastic lifestyle. They make drifting through life comfortable, natural, and productive in a way that their IP cousins can't manage. As for IJs, I'm confident in asserting that many of them can be mistaken for extroverts. They typically come across as more charismatic than IPs, and more activistic and goal-oriented than EPs. Much like IPs are outwardly passive, but inwardly active, IJs are outwardly active, but inwardly passive. Their primary mode of living involves accumulating facts, memories or impressions. Unlike with IPs, this happens passively and largely subconsciously. IJs build up a repository which they refer back to in order to dictate how they act. IJs are the people who always seem to know what they're doing, because they always act in such a way as to conform with what they see as truth. They extrovert judgement, so they are driven to act, and may thus sometimes come across as extroverts, but they would most likely self-identify as introverts.

Because of IJs, who are less readily recognizable as introverts, I would argue that introversion is actually much more common than it appears to be. ISTJs and ISFJs are apparently two of the most common types, and among introverts, probably the least recognizable as the introverts they are, as outwardly, they spend a lot of time and energy keeping things running smoothly, and often do not hesitate to vocalize their concerns about behaviour that doesn't make sense to their factual, historically-focused inner repository.

Assuming that IJs are often mistaken for extroverts, then, that leaves IPs to represent "popular" introversion. The stereotypical introvert fits the IP description fairly well: generally untalkative, maybe shy, and with a strong noncomformist tendency. I'm therefore unsurprised that this study found more frontal lobe activity in introverts, as IPs are naturally most at home inside their own heads, and like to occupy themselves with intense mental exercise. It's not that they're more intelligent, but more so that they like to mull things over or examine things, which in turn makes them naturally apt at coming up with well-thought-out conclusions and solutions. They put in the time it takes to reach those conclusions. The reason IPs are often unhappy is that, as mentioned, modern culture is interested in immediate results, and IPs' personalities are naturally keyed to produce long-term ones. IPs are planners, fixers, writers or artists, who are predisposed to look at complex matters and make detailed judgements on them. This takes time, and society isn't always willing to wait for them when they could be contributing in immediate, tangible ways. Unfortunately, this sort of activity often distracts them from their natural habits and makes them unhappy.
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