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Oklahoma votes to ban AP US History
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

Balzack wrote:

All AP courses should be banned anyway. The only people who take them seriously are high school guidance counselors and high school students.

I've never met someone who actually had credits transfer over for them. And even if they did, you'd be at a disadvantage among the other students since they aren't approved college curriculums- instead they're half-assed by high school teachers who often don't know what they're doing.


Actually, a five on my AP psychology course saved me from having to take that same class for humanities credit for my engineering degree many years ago.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
This is one of the many things that makes me embarrassed about my state. Like where the watermelon is our state vegetable... WATERMELON IS NOT A VEGETABLE! I think that knowing all the history is the most patriotic because that makes our leaders learn what we did so we don't make those unethical choices again.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
This is almost as bad as how the Texas state board of education pretty much determines textbook content for the entire country.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
Wow

Here in England religious studies are on the decline, and lots of people including myself would rather it was removed and replaced with social studies or something along those lines.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
I think I heard something similar in Texas about changing government text books because they were too sympathetic towards muslims
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37 / M / Planet Sanno
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
Oklahoma.

We put it in the middle of the country so it's not the first thing visitors see.

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Well from a conflict theorist perspective of sociology schools do function as " indoctrination of Western bureaucratic ideology" and have a hidden agenda of instilling patriotism in the students.

Source: Social Problems : Community, Policy, and Social Action
Author: Anna Leon-Guerrero

I remember in college my professor giggling about how when the government of Panama did not want to sell us land to build a canal we armed a group of Panamanian rebels who flipped the government and sold it to us for a cheaper price.

Or how he said that Caribbean slavery was WAY worse than american slavery which is true.
My professor wasn't Christian though he was an atheist who served in the military and was a good teacher who engaged the class.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15
This isn't really about AP US History curricula. It's about Advanced Placement itself. Oklahoma's legislature is trying to opt out of funding AP programs and replace them with a program of its own. There's no compulsion for Oklahoma public schools to offer AP courses, and they're not necessary for graduation from Oklahoma public high schools either, so frankly the argument that AP programs violate the state's repeal of Common Core is nonsense and bluster. Still, this is something they can and apparently want to do.

Of course, if they really do intend to introduce materials like sermons and the ten commandments into these alternative programs they'd better be on the lookout for court challenges citing a failure of such standards to pass the Lemon Test. Furthermore, there's no guarantee that colleges will grant any credit transfer in exchange for passing grades in Oklahoma's little pet project. Frankly, this seems like a bad road to go down.

Edit: It's also worth mentioning that the vote in question was a committee vote.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

kingrumZ wrote:

I think I heard something similar in Texas about changing government text books because they were too sympathetic towards muslims


You are correct, sir.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/16/texas-textbook-massacre-tainted-distortions_n_720119.html
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28 / F / SC
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

Balzack wrote:

All AP courses should be banned anyway. The only people who take them seriously are high school guidance counselors and high school students.

I've never met someone who actually had credits transfer over for them. And even if they did, you'd be at a disadvantage among the other students since they aren't approved college curriculums- instead they're half-assed by high school teachers who often don't know what they're doing.


well we haven't met but mine transferred over gave me 12 hours of gen ed when i went to college. was really nice
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

geauxtigers1989 wrote:


kingrumZ wrote:

I think I heard something similar in Texas about changing government text books because they were too sympathetic towards muslims


You are correct, sir.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/16/texas-textbook-massacre-tainted-distortions_n_720119.html


do i win a prize?
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

BlueOni wrote:

This isn't really about AP US History curricula. It's about Advanced Placement itself. Oklahoma's legislature is trying to opt out of funding AP programs and replace them with a program of its own. There's no compulsion for Oklahoma public schools to offer AP courses, and they're not necessary for graduation from Oklahoma public high schools either, so frankly the argument that AP programs violate the state's repeal of Common Core is nonsense and bluster. Still, this is something they can and apparently want to do.

Of course, if they really do intend to introduce materials like sermons and the ten commandments into these alternative programs they'd better be on the lookout for court challenges citing a failure of such standards to pass the Lemon Test. Furthermore, there's no guarantee that colleges will grant any credit transfer in exchange for passing grades in Oklahoma's little pet project. Frankly, this seems like a bad road to go down.

Edit: It's also worth mentioning that the vote in question was a committee vote.




I think it would actually be cool if there were comparative religion courses in school, comparing and contrasting major world religions with theologians of the religions as well as atheist well versed in their theologies so students can view how religion has impacted the world and how it shapes culture(good and bad). SO LONG AS, it was for social and cultural understandings not for indoctrination. OR instead of having so much US history introduce more world history students do not become ethnocentric and ultra nationalist.
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

miotakare wrote:


jhanna_12 wrote:


miotakare wrote:

At least the credit I got from a 5 don't make me pay for a freakishly expensive history course in college, so that's a plus. I don't know why people say that they're not transferable, since all the universities I got accepted to convert AP credit. Additionally, my teachers have been doing these classes for years, they know what probably will and won't be on the tests. Finally, AP classes were the hardest that I've ever taken in high school, even CAP courses don't compare. And besides, I think that it is a complete joke/waste of time to even consider the notion of religious shit.


I only got a 3


If it makes you feel any better I got a 2 on my English composition,


hahaha yay I got a 3 on that as well
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

kingrumZ wrote:


BlueOni wrote:

This isn't really about AP US History curricula. It's about Advanced Placement itself. Oklahoma's legislature is trying to opt out of funding AP programs and replace them with a program of its own. There's no compulsion for Oklahoma public schools to offer AP courses, and they're not necessary for graduation from Oklahoma public high schools either, so frankly the argument that AP programs violate the state's repeal of Common Core is nonsense and bluster. Still, this is something they can and apparently want to do.

Of course, if they really do intend to introduce materials like sermons and the ten commandments into these alternative programs they'd better be on the lookout for court challenges citing a failure of such standards to pass the Lemon Test. Furthermore, there's no guarantee that colleges will grant any credit transfer in exchange for passing grades in Oklahoma's little pet project. Frankly, this seems like a bad road to go down.

Edit: It's also worth mentioning that the vote in question was a committee vote.




I think it would actually be cool if there were comparative religion courses in school, comparing and contrasting major world religions with theologians of the religions as well as atheist well versed in their theologies so students can view how religion has impacted the world and how it shapes culture(good and bad). SO LONG AS, it was for social and cultural understandings not for indoctrination. OR instead of having so much US history introduce more world history students do not become ethnocentric and ultra nationalist.


well, thinking about the american government, I think they would not allow that as they would think it violates the first amendment. There was this instance where a professor banned a student from thanking God for a graduation speech. silly american prof <. <
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Posted 2/18/15 , edited 2/19/15

kingrumZ wrote:

I think it would actually be cool if there were comparative religion courses in school, comparing and contrasting major world religions with theologians of the religions as well as atheist well versed in their theologies so students can view how religion has impacted the world and how it shapes culture(good and bad). SO LONG AS, it was for social and cultural understandings not for indoctrination. OR instead of having so much US history introduce more world history students do not become ethnocentric and ultra nationalist.


This evokes two responses from me:

1. The comparative religions course sounds good in principle, but could be risky business. Maybe it's worth considering as an elective, but I'm wary of it.

2. While I don't think that US History courses foster an environment of ultranationalism and ethnocentrism I'm all for stronger emphasis on a global perspective of history.
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