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Post Reply Plagiarism
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Posted 3/11/15

onibrotonel wrote:

You should see how I struggled in my graphic design classes. It's like I always had to pull "Inception" out my ass. I wanted every idea I came up with new and fresh.

But my teacher told us that ideas we came up with might be subsconsciously borrowed some way or another. Maybe when you were passing a billboard sign while visiting a friend. Or taking a dump in a public bathroom filled with random flyers and ads.

I was like, "FUCK!!!"


That's why I hate copyrights on ideas. I have no problems giving credit, but everything is derivative.
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Posted 3/11/15 , edited 3/11/15
I guess you all are goody goody's, because I've plagarized plenty of times but never got caught.
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Posted 3/11/15

Morbidhanson wrote:

Intentional plagiarism is silly. You know you're not supposed to do it, it is disrespectful to the original writer, and you know what will happen if you get caught. It's funny when people do it on purpose and are too stupid to reword it and get upset when they get an F.

I don't like when teachers make a big deal out of it when it is obviously a mistake, but it should be punished if it is intentional. I had a friend who improperly cited a source (the citation was obviously there, she just made a typo and forgot the ending quotation marks) and the teacher kicked her out of the class, causing her to have to retake it the next semester. It was obviously a mistake since English was her second language and her writing always had grammar and punctuation and word usage errors.

Plagiarism is serious and worthy of punishment, but instructors should make a distinction between when the mistake was in good faith, if it was a mere typo, or when the copying is intentional.

Rarely do you need to copy something word for word (or with 50% of the same words). It's not that hard to understand the concept and to break down what the author meant so that you can put the pieces together yourself. You understand it more when you digest it and get to put it in your own words. And you don't have to deal with citation formatting. You can also do something like write "so-and-so author basically says" and then put your paraphrased thing after it. You should be more eloquent, of course, but that's one way to make it very clear that you are still giving credit to an author even when paraphrasing.

I don't program, so I'm not sure what plagiarism would be like in programming.

I read your profile info.
How much do you charge proofreading someone's writing?
As an editor, do you feel disgusted reading poor grammar? In advance, I'm just going to say that I'm sorry for being the number one suspect of butchering the English language here in the forums.
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Posted 3/11/15
I've plagiarized once. Because I was too lazy to type on my own words.
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20 / M / Calgary, Alberta,...
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Posted 3/11/15
Don't do it. Your professors and TAs have stuff to compare code to other peoples. I helped a friend on a few functions and they found out. I got a warning and got a 0 on that assignment (the original mark was 4.3/4). If it were to happen again, I will be kicked out of the program.
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Posted 3/11/15 , edited 3/11/15

onibrotonel wrote:


Morbidhanson wrote:

Intentional plagiarism is silly. You know you're not supposed to do it, it is disrespectful to the original writer, and you know what will happen if you get caught. It's funny when people do it on purpose and are too stupid to reword it and get upset when they get an F.

I don't like when teachers make a big deal out of it when it is obviously a mistake, but it should be punished if it is intentional. I had a friend who improperly cited a source (the citation was obviously there, she just made a typo and forgot the ending quotation marks) and the teacher kicked her out of the class, causing her to have to retake it the next semester. It was obviously a mistake since English was her second language and her writing always had grammar and punctuation and word usage errors.

Plagiarism is serious and worthy of punishment, but instructors should make a distinction between when the mistake was in good faith, if it was a mere typo, or when the copying is intentional.

Rarely do you need to copy something word for word (or with 50% of the same words). It's not that hard to understand the concept and to break down what the author meant so that you can put the pieces together yourself. You understand it more when you digest it and get to put it in your own words. And you don't have to deal with citation formatting. You can also do something like write "so-and-so author basically says" and then put your paraphrased thing after it. You should be more eloquent, of course, but that's one way to make it very clear that you are still giving credit to an author even when paraphrasing.

I don't program, so I'm not sure what plagiarism would be like in programming.

I read your profile info.
How much do you charge proofreading someone's writing?
As an editor, do you feel disgusted reading poor grammar? In advance, I'm just going to say that I'm sorry for being the number one suspect of butchering the English language here in the forums.


I'm actually really relaxed about it online when reading other people's posts. It only bothers me when they do something terribly wrong and insist they are right. I'll cringe when I see people using apostrophes to indicate plurality, for instance, but I won't do anything about it 99.9% of the time.

My own grammar is sometimes not perfect but that's why I constantly go through even my own posts and edit. It's sort of automatic and I don't notice I am doing it sometimes. I'm always reading and I'm always editing my own writing, whether the writing is on a resume, a forum post, an essay, or a poem. Masterful use of language is a skill more than it is a talent. English is hard. Not even some of the best writers have perfect grammar all the time, and everyone makes typos, so even I find it annoying when someone actually exerts real effort to criticize mistakes that don't interfere with understanding on a forum post that was written in 9 seconds. I don't correct others most of the time since they won't listen, anyway. This does not mean writing like complete garbage in your native language when you've been using it for 20 years is okay but it's pointless trying to teach people who won't listen and will just tell you that you are being condescending.

I am very strict with formal assignments and professional stuff but I wouldn't hand someone a failing mark over one typo. Plagiarism and grammar errors are two distinct problems that warrant different consequences. I'd dock a point but punishing such a small mistake with a failing grade is too harsh. Anyway, I often find proofreading fun so I occasionally do it for free or for favors. I've been way too busy lately, though. Friends still send me stuff to read and I'm doing poetry editing for a friend's magazine but I don't consider it a real job at this point.
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 3/11/15
by the way, there's also programs that can check if a written work is too similar to another work already published (turnitin does automatically for example). if you try to copy/paste something from wiki on your essay, chances are the program will find it and you'll get penalized for it.
in universities, plagiarism can lead to receiving a failing grade for the assignment, failing the course and possibly disciplinary actions.
not worth the risk.
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