First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  Next  Last
Post Reply How old should a child be when they are allowed to change genders if they want?
21009 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Šumeru.
Offline
Posted 3/17/15
Any age before their bodies start to properly develop, I suppose. Aslong as they actually know what they're about to do and are fully committed.
Posted 3/17/15 , edited 3/17/15
i think comparing this to a child calling themselves a cat or some other animal is going too far. gender and species are two completely different things. if you're human, you're human. that's that. there's no changing that. however i do believe that a child should have a say on what gender they feel that they are at an early age. if my child were to call themselves a boy when they're biologically female at whatever age, i would just simply agree with my child and support/accept them for who they are. of course this would probably happen when your child starts understanding more about what's actually going on and begins to recognize the difference between boy and girl and they start to form an idea of who they think they are. if my child is an one year old they're more than likely not really going to understand the difference. if that makes sense?? idk. but yeah. this post probably just went everywhere and doesnt make sense lol

Edit:

for the actual sex change i honestly think that should be allowed once the child is 18. that way they have already had the chance to think everything through and they have some sort of idea of who they are by then.
1329 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / F / NY
Offline
Posted 3/17/15 , edited 3/17/15

amyhasabowtie wrote:

Man, one thing I've learned is that Deer is not a friendly person and can't understand that other people have different views



I can respect opinions as long as it isn't a harmful one that can potentially ruin someone else's well-being. If it's a heinous comment or remark toward someone else's identity I have every right to call them out on their bullshit. It's not a matter of debate. There is nothing to debate about whether or not someone has the right to self-identity. I don't know why you're trying to defend their BS

@ me next time girly
27244 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 3/17/15 , edited 3/17/15
I see a lot of terms being interchangeably used here that shouldn't be. The major ones are "sex" and "gender."

Sex is BIOLOGICAL. Go by the chromosomes. Or the physical manifestation of them.

Gender is a social construct. It is in the mind.

If OP is referring to a sex change and not a gender change, I think it depends (legally speaking) on age of legal consent. People should be free to do what they want to their own bodies if they take full responsibility like adults, don't burden others with expenses, and make the choice for themselves. Obviously, it is best if the person is 100% sure they want change. It is extremely serious, more serious than getting a hundred tattoos.

If they mess up and regret it, tough luck. People have to discern between whether it is necessary for them personally and simply wanting to do it. It's possible to cope with it after regret but that's not the ideal result. Barring medical necessity due to a birth defect, the age of consent should dictate the age at which this is allowable. I actually want to err on the safe side and say 21, not 18, for the US. I also think a psychiatric evaluation should be done before anyone goes under the scalpel for a sex change. The impact on life is tremendous and we don't want doctors being accused of performing sex changes like barbers perform haircuts. It also is a reasonable way of minimizing the likelihood of regret.
36141 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 3/17/15
I'd say 24-25 since it's said that the brain isn't fully developed till then. That's one hell of a decision.
35035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 3/17/15

proxydata wrote:

what I mean is the doctors have to look deeper in to the specific patient issue. The whole transgender issue can possibly be a subcategory of an existing issue thus changing sex won't help.


It's par for the course to check for alternative diagnoses. Quite routine, actually.


and it's not "widely recognized" it maybe more apparent in the States but that can be due to reporting.


You're speaking about two very different things: recognition and prevalence. Prevalence can be impacted by relative reporting. Recognition cannot, and is a matter of the decisions of both legal and scientific bodies. The APA and WHO recognize transpeople as "a thing that happens", so yes: transpeople are widely recognized. The prevalence of transpeople, however, remains fairly blurry.

In other words, you're both right on this one.


According to the DSM-V "transgender identity is now grouped under Dysphoria, specifically Gender Dysphoria, this fact alone suggest it's nothing more than a spectrum with in a disorder thus the exaggerated statement of "I feel like a ___ in a ___" is still regarded as irrational thinking thus the listing.

DSM-V is Widely Available in your local book store.


You may want to consult this fact sheet concerning the changes and rationale for inclusion of the diagnosis in the DSM-V:

http://www.dsm5.org/documents/gender%20dysphoria%20fact%20sheet.pdf

The change in name was for the sake of removing stigma (legal, social, and occupational) from people determined to have what is now called gender dysphoria, as well as to distinguish the experience of gender dysphoria from paraphilic disorders and sexual dysfunctions.

"DSM-5 aims to avoid stigma and ensure clinical care for individuals who see and feel themselves to be a different gender than their assigned gender. It replaces the diagnostic name “gender identity disorder” with “gender dysphoria,” as well as makes other important clarifications in the criteria. It is important to note that gender nonconformity is not in itself a mental disorder. The critical element of gender dysphoria is the presence of clinically significant distress associated with the condition."

The emphasis on the distress (as opposed to the identity itself) is of great importance, as is the use of the term "condition" as opposed to "disorder". It means that the APA's actual intent is contradictory with your own inferences about the condition, and in fact that the very language you're using has been excluded purposefully. Also of great importance for understanding the reasoning behind the APA's decisions is this:

"The DSM-5 diagnosis adds a post-transition specifier for people who are living full-time as the desired gender (with or without legal sanction of the gender change). This ensures treatment access for individuals who continue to undergo hormone therapy, related surgery, or psychotherapy or counseling to support their gender transition."

See? Inclusion of that post-transition specifier was specifically for the purposes of ensuring access to the care you've referred to as "enabling" in the post-transitional period. Now, look at this:

"When it comes to access to care, many of the treatment options for this condition include counseling, cross-sex hormones, gender reassignment surgery, and social and legal transition to the desired gender. To get insurance coverage for the medical treatments, individuals need a diagnosis. The Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders Work Group was concerned that removing the condition as a psychiatric diagnosis—as some had suggested—would jeopardize access to care."

That's important for understanding the diagnosis' inclusion in the manual, proxy. It's for the sake of ensuring quality care and access.
37946 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F
Offline
Posted 3/17/15

deer wrote:


amyhasabowtie wrote:

Man, one thing I've learned is that Deer is not a friendly person and can't understand that other people have different views



I can respect opinions as long as it isn't a harmful one that can potentially ruin someone else's well-being. If it's a heinous comment or remark toward someone else's identity I have every right to call them out on their bullshit. It's not a matter of debate. There is nothing to debate about whether or not someone has the right to self-identity. I don't know why you're trying to defend their BS



deer wrote:

Lmao your old idiot ass. Not surprised you hold the same outdated and irrational views back from when you fought in the war of 1812



after being nasty like that to someone because of their age, I don't think you can respect anyone's opinions, nor will I respect yours :)


@ me next time girly


ok girly xoxoxox
35035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 3/17/15 , edited 3/17/15

severticas wrote:

-attempts to read and dies from splitting headache-




Is the problem that there's too much information, or that the text is over your head? I don't ask to be condescending, only to see if I need to paraphrase something or point to more specific sections.


wolfbrother0 wrote:

there has been political motivation in some of the actions taken by the doctors in trying to shift it away from a disorder.


What else were they to do? The previous language had been abused to establish and/or sustain systemic legal, social, and occupational discrimination against people diagnosed under the previous standards and language, and further had been abused to deny post-transitional patients coverage for their care.


and not all doctors know what the hell they are talking about.


Quite true, although the APA is reputable enough to make an appeal to its authority. The American College of Pediatricians? Not so much.

Posted 3/17/15

BlueOni wrote:


severticas wrote:

-attempts to read and dies from splitting headache-




Is the problem that there's too much information, or that the text is over your head? I don't ask to be condescending, only to see if I need to paraphrase something or point to more specific sections.


Both. It was just so difficult to make out
10350 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / United States
Offline
Posted 3/17/15


Biologically speaking, a child is between toddler and puberty. ANYONE who can present an argument for as to why a child, who has not even started bleeding, or noticed that semen comes out the wang when yanked on please feel free to inbox me.

With that said. No. Duh. No need to even discuss such a stupid idea.

Now if we alter your wording to How old should a person be to change gender? - 18, and id grant 17 if they had emancipation papers from a court.
29840 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 3/17/15
My friend is genderfluid and they are 14. A year (practically) younger than me, I think it's a bit early to decide, but I will support their decision.
10350 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / United States
Offline
Posted 3/17/15 , edited 3/17/15

Shukuzen wrote:

Any age before their bodies start to properly develop, I suppose. Aslong as they actually know what they're about to do and are fully committed.


so you think a 9 year old would have a clue what they were doing? Are you joking or just lacking enough brain cells to see the contradiction of your own statement as well as the overall stupidity of it as well.

How many fucking kids have you met that seriously contemplated their gender identity? Out of those, how many do you think could even explain basic anatomy of a male vs female?


ayesharocks wrote:

My friend is genderfluid and they are 14. A year (practically) younger than me, I think it's a bit early to decide, but I will support their decision.



lmao. just wow, genderfluid...



I guess bisexual would be the natural sexual orientation to that?

29840 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 3/17/15

Shishiku wrote:


ayesharocks wrote:

My friend is genderfluid and they are 14. A year (practically) younger than me, I think it's a bit early to decide, but I will support their decision.



lmao. just wow, genderfluid...



I guess bisexual would be the natural sexual orientation to that?


Nah. She's a lesbian as well as a big aromantic. All these labels, jesus.
20192 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / The Heroes Associ...
Offline
Posted 3/17/15
18.

I wanted to get tattoo's when I was 15, and I regret one of them already, going to cover it up with a Evangelion themed sleeve tattoo though :P.

There are alot of children under 18 who claim to be suffering from such disorders, when they really aren't (some are, but not all). I also went through phases like that, questioning who I was an so forth. However, you should always wait until your old enough to make a choice about something that is irreversible.
Posted 3/17/15

Shishiku wrote:

Biologically speaking, a child is between toddler and puberty. ANYONE who can present an argument for as to why a child, who has not even started bleeding, or noticed that semen comes out the wang when yanked on please feel free to inbox me.

With that said. No. Duh. No need to even discuss such a stupid idea.

Now if we alter your wording to How old should a person be to change gender? - 18, and id grant 17 if they had emancipation papers from a court.


I would endeavor to educate myself on what gender is first before acting like I know what I'm talking about, if I were you.

Then again, half the people on this thread seem to be on the same boat. OP included, of course.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.