Post Reply Hot Peppers?
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43 / M / Finland
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Posted 4/5/15
Any hot pepper fans here?

By happenstance came across some hot peppers someone had left in the fridge half a year ago, that's when it started for me. Well, I doubt those would be that hot anymore. Using sliced habanero on bread and salads lately as the other variants commonly found in stores don't quite cut it anymore. Oh, and hot sauces, the hotter, the better...

I'm a newbie myself on this really. Haven't been able to procure any of the real hot peppers, but am trying to grow seeds from peppers like Trinidad Moriga Scorpion, Bhut Jolokia and Carolina Reaper. Right now only those three, as an experiment because the climate of Finland, even indoors, might not necessarily be enough for a success story...

Tried slowly acquainting myself with hot sauces as well, most seem to be made with Bhut Jolokia and Habanero as base, but I've ordered some based on Trinidad Moriga Scorpion and Carolina Reaper. Generally so far, at least as far as my own experiences go, the hotness of sauces isn't as protruding as eating a hot pepper like habanero raw despite being made of its badder cousins. It works a bit better if I take a bit of paper, pour a little sauce on it, and then simply wet my finger in it a little and then lick that finger, then it does reveal its hotness better. Often do that when watching anime, as a spoonful that way easily lasts your average episode...

There seems to be a lot of advice on the net on how to avoid burns on hands and fingers. Most like to recommend rubber gloves, and soaking in milk or oil. I really didn't see that as very practical in the long run so tried for a simpler solution. One day, took sauce made mostly of Bhut Jolokia and rubbed my hands wet with it. And repeated that for a week, once per day. Let's just say it was hell the first night after. The second after, not so much. After that, my hands barely registered it. Not sure if it's meant to work that fast as it seems a little too convenient? Especially as I don't see that type of advice offered anywhere on the net either. But at least for me it worked. I know the hotness is there as if I'm careless and touch other places even after washing, it can be painful, but my hands don't feel a thing...
I did learn one thing during all that though. One does not lit a fireplace, or handle hot liquids, after you've wet your hands with a hot sauce, you do those things beforehand. At least not unless you're a masochist...

If there are other hot pepper fans on these forums, any advice for a newbie?
Posted 4/5/15
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Posted 4/5/15
I grew up with hot peppers being part of a meal since I was a child. Mostly the scotch bonnet one. We'd use a hot pepper sauce the same way some use ketchup. I've made my own pepper sauce sometimes. I've mellowed a bit of late but still enjoy some hot spicey stuff. Due to sensitive skin I wouldn't spend a lot of time handling cut hot peppers. I still don't use gloves but there are days when I know my skin is just too sensitive to handle peppers so I avoid them at those times.

Some I know have reduced the amount of pepper they use, not because they've grown to dislike the taste but because they can't stand "the ring of fire", a day later from the other end.
Posted 4/5/15
The hottest pepper I've ate was a whole raw habanero and I don't know about going any further than that since it burns for a while but my stomach tends to hurt after eating one.
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Posted 4/5/15 , edited 4/5/15
I love hot peppers and use them to make my salsas.
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Posted 4/5/15 , edited 4/5/15

potentsativa wrote:

The hottest pepper I've ate was a whole raw habanero and I don't know about going any further than that since it burns for a while but my stomach tends to hurt after eating one.

If it was your first habanero pretty sure it would burn. After I ate my own whole raw habanero the first time, I do remember it being a bit too hot. But mostly by accident, they were labeled as habanero-paprika on the store shelf and the paprika usually denotes the sweet variant, bell pepper, so I didn't think they'd be hot. So I bought some, and once home thought I'd try snack on one while making a sandwich. Same for my stomache, it was painful that night.
But I've grown accustomed, I can eat raw habaneros without the burning now. Yes, they are still hot, but not 'burning' hot. Though they aren't too much to my tastes by themselves, rather prefer to have them on bread, in salad, or in food. Same for the stomache cramps, I don't experience those anymore either, no matter how much peppers/hot sauces I indulge on...

Posted 4/5/15 , edited 4/5/15

Gracias2 wrote:


potentsativa wrote:

The hottest pepper I've ate was a whole raw habanero and I don't know about going any further than that since it burns for a while but my stomach tends to hurt after eating one.

If it was your first habanero pretty sure it would burn. After I ate my own whole raw habanero the first time, I do remember it being a bit too hot. But mostly by accident, they were labeled as habanero-paprika on the store shelf and the paprika usually denotes the sweet variant, bell pepper, so I didn't think they'd be hot. So I bought some, and once home thought I'd try snack on one while making a sandwich. Same for my stomache, it was painful that night.
But I've grown accustomed, I can eat raw habaneros without the burning now. Yes, they are still hot, but not 'burning' hot. Though they aren't too much to my tastes by themselves, rather prefer to have them on bread, in salad, or in food. Same for the stomache cramps, I don't experience those anymore either, no matter how much peppers/hot sauces I indulge on...



I eat habaneros every fall into winter but I can only handle so much until my stomach gives, my tongue acclimates to the capsaicin eventualy but the stomach pains...
Posted 4/5/15


I knew it! It's the red ones.
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Posted 4/6/15 , edited 4/6/15
I've grown hot peppers for about 15-20 years.My Scorpions last year produced beautifully but my favorites are Bhut Jolokia .I make a very hot sweet Raspberry/Strawberry condiment and use it like a type of jelly.I'm not a fan of growing Habanero because of their inherently low yield and I don't care for the bitter/smoky flavor that requires deveining to remove.In fact I'll be starting my seeds in about four days and I did winter over one of my Scorpions under lights.I also have some pics of Scorpions that I grew in my Crunchyroll pictures.
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Posted 4/6/15 , edited 4/6/15

Gracias2 wrote:

Any hot pepper fans here?

By happenstance came across some hot peppers someone had left in the fridge half a year ago, that's when it started for me. Well, I doubt those would be that hot anymore. Using sliced habanero on bread and salads lately as the other variants commonly found in stores don't quite cut it anymore. Oh, and hot sauces, the hotter, the better...

I'm a newbie myself on this really. Haven't been able to procure any of the real hot peppers, but am trying to grow seeds from peppers like Trinidad Moriga Scorpion, Bhut Jolokia and Carolina Reaper. Right now only those three, as an experiment because the climate of Finland, even indoors, might not necessarily be enough for a success story...

Tried slowly acquainting myself with hot sauces as well, most seem to be made with Bhut Jolokia and Habanero as base, but I've ordered some based on Trinidad Moriga Scorpion and Carolina Reaper. Generally so far, at least as far as my own experiences go, the hotness of sauces isn't as protruding as eating a hot pepper like habanero raw despite being made of its badder cousins. It works a bit better if I take a bit of paper, pour a little sauce on it, and then simply wet my finger in it a little and then lick that finger, then it does reveal its hotness better. Often do that when watching anime, as a spoonful that way easily lasts your average episode...

There seems to be a lot of advice on the net on how to avoid burns on hands and fingers. Most like to recommend rubber gloves, and soaking in milk or oil. I really didn't see that as very practical in the long run so tried for a simpler solution. One day, took sauce made mostly of Bhut Jolokia and rubbed my hands wet with it. And repeated that for a week, once per day. Let's just say it was hell the first night after. The second after, not so much. After that, my hands barely registered it. Not sure if it's meant to work that fast as it seems a little too convenient? Especially as I don't see that type of advice offered anywhere on the net either. But at least for me it worked. I know the hotness is there as if I'm careless and touch other places even after washing, it can be painful, but my hands don't feel a thing...
I did learn one thing during all that though. One does not lit a fireplace, or handle hot liquids, after you've wet your hands with a hot sauce, you do those things beforehand. At least not unless you're a masochist...

If there are other hot pepper fans on these forums, any advice for a newbie?


If you don't wear gloves be extremely careful on your next trip to the urinal or I'll guarantee you it will be one of the most memorable events of your life.
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Posted 4/6/15

pirththee wrote:

If you don't wear gloves be extremely careful on your next trip to the urinal or I'll guarantee you it will be one of the most memorable events of your life.

Believe me, I'm very careful about 'those' parts when handling this stuff, and the eyes. Eyes have been close though, but haven't had a full slip yet...
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Posted 4/6/15

Hot Peppers ???
I really don't like any peppers that's in my meal . I just don't like the taste . But then, I like spicy food though .
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Posted 4/6/15
Here's some from last year.
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