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Post Reply Do you hate job interviews?
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22 / F / Puerto Rico
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Posted 4/11/15

serifsansserif

Really, most work ISN'T that hard.


What do you consider difficult work?

Santera

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35 / M
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Posted 4/11/15

Santera wrote:


serifsansserif

Really, most work ISN'T that hard.


What do you consider difficult work?

Santera



Good question.... :P

I guess it's when your faced with time and manpower constraints as well as restrictions based on the clients desires.

This week was one such situation where I had to manage the schedule and demands of four clients with 3 (including myself, who's at another job) employees unavailable for just and a fourth one a distance away. I managed it, and got the owner in to cover a little bit, but it was tricky. Especially with the fifth employee quitting a week ago.

It meant recalibrating things to adapt to 4 or 5 different schedules for different people and making it all work. But then again, I do that often enough. It's harder because that's just one job problem in my mind and there's 4-5 others. (plus 3 or 4 volunteer gigs)

But, in general, any task can be broken down into smaller jobs and smaller projects. Complex skills are based on simpler ones. Mental deconstruction and reconstruction... Anything is possible given enough time and effort.
Posted 4/11/15
I do.

Everything about it screams, "pretentious". and that doesn't go well with my personality...

I keep forgetting I have to lie...
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Posted 4/11/15

GayAsianBoy wrote:

I do.

Everything about it screams, "pretentious". and that doesn't go well with my personality...

I keep forgetting I have to lie...


That too...

Sooooooooooooo much agreeing happening there.
Posted 4/11/15
Nope.

I'm very good at making people like me.

Interviews are usually fairly easy.
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27 / M / TX
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Posted 4/11/15
The interviews I went to where always annoying but I put up with them since I either wanted/needed the job. When I had the chance to learn recruiting myself I took it and never again do I want to do that.

Been on both side of the aisle and yes I hate going to interviews and giving them at where I work. We used to have over a dozen recruiters for the u.s. but with the slow down we are down to 4. So anyone who wanted to learn recruiting was given a chance. The most annoying people were the ones that would call about 3 to 5 times a day to check on the status of their application and they want to give me their life story when I have other things that need to be done. I need to look at driving records "7yrs or more", valid endorsements and various other things. Hiring a guy cost close to 10k and training them to be at the level we need them to be cost 35k. So yes i'm going to take my time to find the best candidate that I can.

Had young guys come into job fairs where I have a sign that says cdl, hazmat, tankers all required to fill out an app and so many say they have them just to fill the app and then tell me at the end they don't have them. At that point I just toss them into a box I have that I says reject. I know that not nice but I can't stand having my time wasted. It's crazy when you have 1 job and over a 100 guys apply for it. I have to look through each one myself and having people call to check on the status just slows me down.

I could see both sides and now I know what interviewers want to hear and what to stay away from. You won't believe how many questions your not allowed to ask because it could be taken as discrimination. But ultimately just have some knowledge about the company your applying at know about the job your applying for and don't take it as you vs the interviewer.
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22 / F / Puerto Rico
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Posted 4/11/15 , edited 6/7/15

serifsansserif wrote:


Santera wrote:


serifsansserif

Really, most work ISN'T that hard.


What do you consider difficult work?

Santera



Good question.... :P

I guess it's when your faced with time and manpower constraints as well as restrictions based on the clients desires.

This week was one such situation where I had to manage the schedule and demands of four clients with 3 (including myself, who's at another job) employees unavailable for just and a fourth one a distance away. I managed it, and got the owner in to cover a little bit, but it was tricky. Especially with the fifth employee quitting a week ago.

It meant recalibrating things to adapt to 4 or 5 different schedules for different people and making it all work. But then again, I do that often enough. It's harder because that's just one job problem in my mind and there's 4-5 others. (plus 3 or 4 volunteer gigs)

But, in general, any task can be broken down into smaller jobs and smaller projects. Complex skills are based on simpler ones. Mental deconstruction and reconstruction... Anything is possible given enough time and effort.


*sigh* *walks away*

Santera
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Posted 4/11/15
I've been on both sides of the interview process, so I neither love nor hate it. As someone earlier in the thread mentioned--the interviewer is nervous, too. You only have 30 or 45 minutes to try to determine whether the person that HR has asked you to interview has the skills to do the job AND is a good fit with the team. I've worked with enough bad fits over the years to take my role as interviewer very seriously. Bad fits are a drain on trying to complete your own work in a quality and timely manner.

On the interviewee side of things, I've come to regard interviews as a two-way street. I'm "interviewing" the company as much as they're interviewing me. (I like to ask questions such as what the interviewer likes most/least about working at the company. The answers can be very telling!) Also, I've been to a lot of interviews, but I've gotten many more rejections than offers--unfortunately it's the way things work.

Open-ended questions have a purpose (at least they're supposed to). There are many good resources (online and in books) that explain what the interviewer is looking for when asking an open-ended question. Do your homework beforehand and you can answer these types of questions. (Just don't use the "canned" answers you'll sometimes find. :-) ) And, think of specific examples that you can use to back up your "soft skills" answers. For example, if you're asked about your customer service skills, back up your answer with a specific example of an application of one of those skills--for example (if you can) talk about a time when you were able to turn an irate customer into a happy customer. Are you still in school or recently graduated? Think about situations from school or your personal life that you can turn into examples for soft skills. If you had to mediate a disagreement between two friends that turned out positive where you all remained friends, that's a good example for negotiation skills, you're a team player, communication skills, and so on.
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46 / M / Between yesterday...
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Posted 4/11/15
A few things to not sweating these. They are part of getting the job.

1. Relax you are either going to get the job or not. You being relax goes a ways to getting the job.
2. Be yourself.
3. Follow up during the week send an email or letter thanking them for the interview.
4. Ask questions about what they expect of you on the job.
5. Actively listen this means pay attention to the person give them all your focus.
6. Try to be the last person you will be the first one they think of if you were the on the short list.

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46 / M / Between yesterday...
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Posted 4/11/15

Santera wrote:


serifsansserif wrote:


Santera wrote:


serifsansserif

Really, most work ISN'T that hard.


What do you consider difficult work?

Santera



Good question.... :P

I guess it's when your faced with time and manpower constraints as well as restrictions based on the clients desires.

This week was one such situation where I had to manage the schedule and demands of four clients with 3 (including myself, who's at another job) employees unavailable for just and a fourth one a distance away. I managed it, and got the owner in to cover a little bit, but it was tricky. Especially with the fifth employee quitting a week ago.

It meant recalibrating things to adapt to 4 or 5 different schedules for different people and making it all work. But then again, I do that often enough. It's harder because that's just one job problem in my mind and there's 4-5 others. (plus 3 or 4 volunteer gigs)

But, in general, any task can be broken down into smaller jobs and smaller projects. Complex skills are based on simpler ones. Mental deconstruction and reconstruction... Anything is possible given enough time and effort.


*sigh* *walks away*

Santera


First rule of a good engineer KISS Keep it simple s. You can look up the Kiss principle and get the s I'm not posting the word here. I use the full version and refer to myself as the s not that I am it just reminds me that other folks are and it keeps task simple and broken down to where anyone can do them. This is an art form if you get good at it your bosses will love you.

Complex tasks are easy take the time to figure out how to make them simple tasks. Cut out steps that aren't needed look at where you can save time. Documents and forms that can be reused should be saved someplace safe and copies of those should be used. Take ten to twenty minutes find programs that make it easier to do the work. If you can write your own I know not everyone can code find someone that can.

Had to test a website a few months back everyone was going through taking single screen shots of each page and scrolling through to get the rest. Took me twenty minutes to find a desktop program that captured scrolling screen shots. With that I finished in about half the time even with the load of work I had to do. If you aren't working in the tech field soft skills like active listening help a lot if you learn to do it naturally jobs get easier.
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28 / M / A Desert within a...
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Posted 4/11/15
I hate interviews mostly the "why do you want to work here?" cause general work seems like winning the lotto actually getting a call back. Hahaha I work in a porno store now... but I just got my phlebotomy certification an going to need to interview soon....
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37 / M
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Posted 4/11/15
Passion and confidence can get you pretty far in an interview. Remember, most of the time your skills have already been pre-assessed by the "gatekeeper" in HR and the hiring manager is looking to fill a spot on their team; the easier the hiring manager thinks you can be integrated into the team (good soft skills), the better your chances at being hired.

I've worked in IT and Software since 1996 and have been on both sides of the interview numerous times. Hard skills can be taught, soft skills are a bit more abstract and greatly affect the speed at learning hard skills.

Showing passion and a willingness to learn outside of business hours will usually get you ahead of other candidates.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 4/11/15

Sogno- wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:


Hearing the person interview me ask "Why do you want to work/why would you like to work at this store?" makes me bitter.


because i need a freakin' job that's why

i hate that quesiton >.>

and yes i hate interviews. ugh. i'm such an awkward person tbh


Exactly. I need money and job was the only one hiring or the best option.

I dislike the awkward and nervous feeling. I can't even find the right words to say either.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 4/11/15

Khaltazar wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

I hate online job applications and I dislike job interviews.

Hearing the person interview me ask "Why do you want to work/why would you like to work at this store?" makes me bitter.


The reason for that question is to determine if you're a good fit for them to hire.

Obviously, you want to work there to make money, but they want someone who is not just there for the money.
For an example: If you're a fresh PhD out of college and are interviewing at hospitals to become an associate resident the hospital will ask why they want to work here. The shallow response is "I want to be a doctor because they make a lot of money." The ideal response would be "I'm here because I researched this hospital and ... (insert research here) ... I also like to help people and went to college with that mindset." Who would you hire? Someone who is just blunt and just wants money or someone who you KNOW already wants money, but also has a passion for what they do? This may not apply as much to minimum wage jobs of course.


That's because its a minimum wage job. There are only a few a jobs that I can actually would love to work at. Most of the time it's just money on my mind because I need it.
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24 / M / Surrey, UK
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Posted 4/11/15
Yes I do. Mainly because I get nervous as fuck.
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