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Post Reply What would you do if you were a teacher/principle and most of your class engaged in passive aggressive bullying?
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Posted 4/15/15
Let's say you have one kid with bad social skills and an eccentric personality, maybe he's autistic/aspergers... But as a result he's bullied.
But he's not getting beat up, insulted, or cyberbullied... He's being shunned. He's getting the silent treatment. The kids are refusing to talk to him and shunning him from social circles.

If you were a teacher, what would/could you do.
Posted 4/15/15
Put him in another class lol, im kidding. He' probably the problem if so many have a problem with him.
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Posted 4/15/15 , edited 4/16/15
Honestly, you can't do much. You're a teacher, you are there to teach. Not to meddle in affairs.
dsjb 
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Posted 4/15/15 , edited 4/15/15
Sadly if its purely passive there's almost nothing you can do, sometimes moving him into a different class can work if they have got off on a bad foot with the current one or introducing them to one of the school clubs. Generally I employ the help of some of the good kids in the class and ask them to include the kid in their social circle. Sometimes that works very few people can't find some common ground when it comes to it.
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Posted 4/15/15 , edited 4/15/15
Lol..

Being someone who has psychological issues and being someone who is friends with alot of psychological issues.

Sometimes only being shunned much better than being let in and being bullied.

There are alot of kids I know who were severely autistic and were flat out plain annoying. While its not their fault, it doesn't make it any easier to deal with. On days when I was in an already pissed off mood, I would avoid them, or try to cut conversations as short as possible in order to avoid actually saying something hurtful.

Not many people dislike or want to bully kids like that (besides those truly douche kids who do) but it is extremely hard to deal with people who do have those issues; so it is sometimes understandable that people will avoid them.

Its not malicious and or nasty, but most times, kids who do suffer from autism are quite annoying to the general populace and deserve special aid in ensuring they get the help they need.

I have ADHD and suffer from bipolar disorder and mania; so I know that I myself can be pretty annoying when im in my hyper mode.

Sometimes the best thing to do, if its not aggressive bullying is to let it play its course. There are chances that hes not actually as alone as you think. You never want to force children to play with the kids they are avoiding, otherwise it could turn aggressive

-Sources for this are my personal experiences.
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Posted 4/15/15 , edited 4/15/15
There's no indication given of the student being notably bothered by the situation, or that the entire class is doing it out of maliciousness. There is little information for me to work with. For now, I'd ask one or two students about it, including the shunned student, and go from there. Perhaps the most foolhardy course of action, however, would be to punish the class outright and/or try and force them to get along. Third parties cannot simply make people be friends.

Honestly, what if the shunned student is alright with it, or doesn't want to be friends with them? I was often shunned in classes for being the intimidating weirdo and, frankly, I didn't mind it at all. Half the time, I would even go out of my way to avoid interacting with people. This is the kind of information that's important to know before doing much to try and "remedy" the situation.

If the scenario proves legitimately bothersome, I can have the student transferred to another class, where he/she just might find buddies.
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Posted 4/15/15
Social interaction is honestly not a "right" for every student. Keep in mind humans are in every sense of the word animals; we all interact, and certainly not interacting is part of that. Do your best to help but don't force the issue. Its quite complicated since you might make things worse by acting, he could also grow out of it on his own maybe? It would depend on age and many other factors as well.
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37 / M / So. Cal
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Posted 4/15/15
what could you do? force the other kids into socializing with him/her/other? Bully them into being their friend?
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20 / F / UK
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Posted 4/15/15
not much can be done as other people are saying. especially from a teachers position. i guess maybe class/group activities that would encourage the pupils to interact with said child etc.. other than that its just an unfortunate problem. if anything, the kids 'shunning' the other pupil are pretty much at a loss. not to mention i'd personally try and teach my kids to accept every kind of person and give them the time of day. more to it than just what can a teacher do.
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20 / M / Vermont
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Posted 4/15/15
This is a very tough question. I think that if the person who is being shunned really wants to make friends and socialize then it is a problem. At the same time if he is does not want to socialize he should not have to. The teacher could be as friendly as possible with the student but only so far as a professional relationship can be considered friends. I would encourage the shunned student to speak up or try to find a subject that they are interested in and make them sound smart in front of the class(?)
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28 / M / USA! USA! USA!
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Posted 4/15/15
Well, if Shoujo taught me anything, bullying is usually the result of pent up yuri lust, so I would discreetly give them the key to the roof sobthey could sort their hormones out.
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21 / F / Southern US
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Posted 4/15/15
Well, in school I never really socialized with most of my peers. I had a couple of friends I would hang out with and talk to, but the rest of the students weren't really my type of people. I liked to talk to my teachers, though, and in the classes that I didn't have friends in, having a teacher I liked made it pretty tolerable.

I'd probably just try to talk to the student in question. Maybe just talk to them about a hobby they have or something.
Posted 4/15/15 , edited 4/15/15
Its strange that I just so happen to be watching Another. Sigh, I'd have to agree that there is little that could be done save possibly (and these are not cheerful choices, unfortunately) :

1) That the person bears with it and ignores it, concentrating on his/her classwork. In essence, just tries to get through the school day.

2) Finds a way to get changed out of class. (although gossip and rumors can spread school-wide, this also may not work, but it may help)

3) Changes schools (drastic but possible. Helpful as long as the student doesn't have the problem and doesn't carry it to the next school)

4) Gets Home-schooled (like #3, drastic, maybe possible. I know of a few friends who were home-schooled. )

Posted 4/15/15
Well the teacher could always try to become the kid friend, but does the kid want a friend in the first place a all ? Forcing somebody to be friend with people they don't want to could end badly for ether side.
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22 / M / UK
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Posted 4/15/15
i doubt that a person can be hated by everyone in their class, but lets say it does happen then i would have them spend their extra time or even some lessons in a different classroom with professionals that deal with this and then hopefully that can increase their social skills enough for them to initiate in group activities. and if that doesnt work then ive tried, nothing more i can do.
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